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Product listing: SSH1 (E1K3W) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q8WYL5 #13578 to α-Smooth Muscle Actin (1A4) Mouse mAb (IF Formulated), UniProt ID P62736 #48938

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin is an evolutionarily conserved, actin-binding protein that severs actin filaments during processes that rely on actin filament dynamics, including cytokinesis, cell migration, invasion, and neuronal development. Actin severing and filament depolymerization are regulated through the controlled cycling of cofilin between the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms (1). The kinases LIMK and TESK inactivate cofilin by phosphorylating it at Ser3 (2,3). The slingshot homologs (SSH1, SSH2 and SSH3) and chronophin/PDXP phosphatases remove phosphate from cofilin at Ser3, enabling cofilin binding to actin and filament depolymerization (3). LIMK and SSH1 regulate cofilin activity downstream of neuregulin signaling in Schwann cells (4).Slingshot homolog 1 (SSH1) can also dephosphorylate LIMK kinases, suppressing LIMK phosphorylation of cofilin (5). In addition, SSH1 modulates actin dynamics by stabilizing F-actin and promoting actin bundling independent of its cofilin phosphatase activity (6). SSH1 activity is regulated by phosphorylation and protein-protein interaction through various signaling pathways (1). Binding of SSH1 to F-actin stimulates its cofilin phosphatase activity (7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Stathmin is a ubiquitously expressed microtubule destabilizing phosphoprotein that is upregulated in a number of cancers. The amino terminus of the protein contains multiple phosphorylation sites and is involved in the promotion of tubulin filament depolymerization. Phosphorylation at these sites inactivates the protein and stabilizes microtubules. Ser16 phosphorylation by CaM kinases II and IV (1,2) increases during G2/M-phase and is involved in mitotic spindle regulation (3,4). Ser38 is a target for cdc2 kinase (5) and TNF-induced cell death gives rise to reactive oxygen intermediates leading to hyperphosphorylation of stathmin (6). EGF receptor activation of Rac and cdc42 also increases phosphorylation of stathmin on Ser16 and Ser38 (7). Other closely related family members are neuronally expressed and include SCG10, SCLIP, RB3 and its splice variants RB3' and RB3''. Stathmin and SCG10 have been shown to play roles in neuronal-like development in PC-12 cells (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Testis-specific kinase 1 (TESK1) is a LIMK-related protein kinase originally identified to be expressed highly in testes and subsequently shown to be expressed in a wide variety of tissues and cell types (1-4). TESK1 phosphorylates the actin severing protein cofilin at Ser3, inactivating cofilin and thus regulating the organization of the actin cytoskeleton (2). Integrin signaling activates TESK1 activity and leads to stress fiber formation and cell spreading (2,5,6). TESK1 is involved in regulation of ERK signaling through its interaction with Spry2 (7) and regulation of cell spreading through its interaction with the focal adhesion protein actopaxin/α-parvin (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tropomodulin-1 (TMOD1) belongs to a conserved family of cytoskeletal proteins (TMOD1-4) that play an important role in modulating actin cytoskeleton dynamics. TMOD proteins function as actin capping proteins, which stabilize actin filaments by inhibiting both elongation and depolymerization (1). While many proteins have been identified that cap the rapidly growing barbed end of actin filaments, TMODs are the only proteins thus far identified that cap the slowly growing pointed end (2). A research study in triple-negative breast cancer cells identified TMOD1 as a target of NF-κB signaling, and showed that increased TMOD1 expression was associated with enhanced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model (3). Molecular expression of TMOD1 was also identified as part of a unique gene expression signature that could discriminate ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma from other malignancy subtypes (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1) belongs to the high molecular weight members of tropomyosin family (1,2). The protein exists in an alpha-helical coiled-coil conformation and binds multiple acting monomers in a tight manner to stabilize and regulate the actin filament (3). Tropomyosins fullfill functions in muscle and non-muscle cells. In muscle cells, tropomyosins associate with the troponin complex and play a central role in the calcium-dependent regulation of striated muscle contraction in vertebrates. In non-muscle cells, tropomyosins are implicated in the formation and stabilization of cytoskeletal actin filaments to ensure normal cellular processes (1,2). Mutations of tropomysin-1 have been reported as a cause of dilated cardiac myopathies (4). Tropomyosin-1 also functions as a tumor suppressor, and many malignant tumors demonstrate downregulation of tropomyosin-1 expression (5-8). Tropomyosin-1 is phosphorylated at Ser283 through the Erk/DAPK pathway, which promotes stress fiber formation in response to oxidative stress (9-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1) belongs to the high molecular weight members of tropomyosin family (1,2). The protein exists in an alpha-helical coiled-coil conformation and binds multiple acting monomers in a tight manner to stabilize and regulate the actin filament (3). Tropomyosins fullfill functions in muscle and non-muscle cells. In muscle cells, tropomyosins associate with the troponin complex and play a central role in the calcium-dependent regulation of striated muscle contraction in vertebrates. In non-muscle cells, tropomyosins are implicated in the formation and stabilization of cytoskeletal actin filaments to ensure normal cellular processes (1,2). Mutations of tropomysin-1 have been reported as a cause of dilated cardiac myopathies (4). Tropomyosin-1 also functions as a tumor suppressor, and many malignant tumors demonstrate downregulation of tropomyosin-1 expression (5-8). Tropomyosin-1 is phosphorylated at Ser283 through the Erk/DAPK pathway, which promotes stress fiber formation in response to oxidative stress (9-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Twinfilin is an actin monomer-binding protein found in all eukaryotes (1). Mammals have three isoforms. Twinfilin-1 and twinfilin-2a are expressed in most non-muscle cell types, whereas twinfilin-2b is the main isoform in adult heart and skeletal muscle (2). Twinfilins are composed of two ADF-homology domains connected by a 30 kDa linker region. All twinfilins have been shown to form a 1:1 complex with G-actin, but not F-actin (reviewed in 3). Twinfilin-1 was originally known as A6 protein tyrosine kinase and thought to be part of a novel class of protein kinases. However, the protein was renamed after further studies showed no evidence of tyrosine kinase activity (4). Twinfilin-1 helps to prevent the actin filament assembly by forming a complex with actin monomers and, in mammals, has been shown to cap the filament barbed ends. It has been suggested that this regulates cell motility (5). Suppression of twinfilin-1 has also been shown to slow lymphoma cell migration to lymph nodes (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) was originally characterized as a substrate of both cGMP- and cAMP-dependent kinases (PKG and PKA, or cGPK and cAPK, respectively) (1). It is now believed that VASP belongs to the Ena/VASP family of adaptor proteins linking the cytoskeletal system to the signal transduction pathways and that it functions in cytoskeletal organization, fibroblast migration, platelet activation and axon guidance (2,3). Three phosphorylation sites, Ser157, Ser239, and Thr278, have been identified. Ser239 is the major PKG phosphorylation site while Ser157 is the major PKA phosphorylation site (4). Evidence suggests that VASP phosphorylation reduces its association with actin and has a negative effect on actin polymerization (5). Phosphorylation at Ser239 of VASP is a useful marker for monitoring PKG activation and signaling (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µg
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Actinin (D6F6) XP® Rabbit mAb #6487.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immuno fluorescence analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Smooth Muscle Actin (1A4) Mouse mAb #56856.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Actin proteins are major components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. At least six vertebrate actin isoforms have been identified. The cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin proteins are referred to as “non-muscle” actin proteins as they are predominantly expressed in non-muscle cells where they control cell structure and motility (1). The α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin proteins are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively. The smooth muscle α-actin and γ-actin proteins are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. The α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) is also known as aortic smooth muscle actin. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Actin proteins are major components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. At least six vertebrate actin isoforms have been identified. The cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin proteins are referred to as “non-muscle” actin proteins as they are predominantly expressed in non-muscle cells where they control cell structure and motility (1). The α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin proteins are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively. The smooth muscle α-actin and γ-actin proteins are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. The α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) is also known as aortic smooth muscle actin. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1).