Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Product listing: Myosin Light Chain 2 Antibody, UniProt ID P24844 #3672 to Phospho-Keratin 17 (Ser44) Antibody, UniProt ID Q04695 #3519

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myosin is composed of six polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two pairs of light chains. Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), also known as myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC), RLC, or LC20, has many isoforms depending on its distribution. In smooth muscle, MLC2 is phosphorylated at Thr18 and Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner (1). This phosphorylation is correlated with myosin ATPase activity and smooth muscle contraction (2). ROCK also phosphorylates Ser19 of smooth muscle MLC2, which regulates the assembly of stress fibers (3). Phosphorylation of smooth muscle MLC2 at Ser1/Ser2 and Ser9 by PKC and cdc2 has been reported to inhibit myosin ATPase activity (4,5). Phosphorylation by cdc2 controls the timing of cytokinesis (5). Transgenic mice lacking phosphorylation sites on the cardiac muscle isoform show morphological and functional abnormalities (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Myosin Va is a molecular motor protein involved in the transport of organelles, vesicles and other cellular cargo along actin filaments (reviewed in 1). The molecule consists of two identical heavy chains, which dimerize via helical domains in a coiled coil structure. The amino-terminal motor domains of the heavy chains contain both the ATPase and the actin-binding activities of myosin Va. The globular tail domains act in a regulatory capacity, binding the myosin Va cargo (2) or inhibiting motor activity by binding the head domains and preventing ATP consumption (3). Mutation of the murine dilute gene, which encodes myosin Va, causes defects in coat pigmentation as well as severe neurological defects (4). In melanocytes, the coiled coil structure of myosin Va is important in regulating the trafficking of melanosomes in conjunction with melanophilin and Rab27a (5). Myosin Va regulates trafficking and exocytosis of secretory granules in neuroendocrine cells (reviewed in 6) as well as RNA transport and distribution (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein serine/threonine phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cell functions. Substrate specificity is determined by the binding of a regulatory subunit to the PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). It is estimated that over fifty different regulatory subunits exist (1).The myosin phosphatase holoenzyme is composed of three subunits: PP1c, a targeting/regulatory subunit (MYPT/myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), and a 20 kDa subunit of unknown function (M20). MYPT binding to PP1cδ alters the conformation of the catalytic cleft and increases enzyme activity and specificity (2). Two MYPT isoforms that are 61% identical have been described. MYPT1 is widely expressed, while MYPT2 expression appears to be exclusive to heart and brain (3). Related family members include MBS85, MYPT3, and TIMAP (4).Myosin phosphatase regulates the interaction of actin and myosin in response to signaling through the small GTPase Rho. Rho activity inhibits myosin phosphatase via Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). Phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853 results in phosphatase inhibition and cytoskeletal reorganization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nucleoporin 98 kDa (NUP98) is a component of the nuclear pore complex. It is expressed as three different precursors that undergo auto-cleavage to generate a common amino-terminal 98 kDa peptide (NUP98) and carboxy-terminal 6, 96 (NUP96) and 88 (p88) kDa peptides (1,2). NUP98 contains FG and GLFG repeat domains at its amino terminus and a RNA-binding domain in its carboxy terminus (3). The NUP98 gene is localized on chromosome 11p15.5, a region frequently rearranged in leukemias. To date, 15 fusion partners have been identified for NUP98 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nucleoporin 98 kDa (NUP98) is a component of the nuclear pore complex. It is expressed as three different precursors that undergo auto-cleavage to generate a common amino-terminal 98 kDa peptide (NUP98) and carboxy-terminal 6, 96 (NUP96) and 88 (p88) kDa peptides (1,2). NUP98 contains FG and GLFG repeat domains at its amino terminus and a RNA-binding domain in its carboxy terminus (3). The NUP98 gene is localized on chromosome 11p15.5, a region frequently rearranged in leukemias. To date, 15 fusion partners have been identified for NUP98 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: SPAK (STE20/SPS1-related Pro/Ala-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive 1) are members of the GCK family serine/threonine kinases. Overexpression and in vitro studies demonstrate that SPAK is able to activate p38 MAP kinase indicating a possible role for SPAK in the stress response (1). Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that SPAK and OSR1 bind to Na-K-2Cl cotransporters NKCC1 and NKCC2 and K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 (2). WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate SPAK at Thr243/247 and Ser380 (3-5). Similarly, WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate OSR1 at Thr185 and Ser315 (3,4). Phosphorylation at these sites stimulates SPAK and OSR1 activity, leading to NKCC1 phosphorylation and enhanced NKCC1 activity (3-5). SPAK is also phosphorylated at Ser311 by PKCθ in response to T cell activation. Substitution of Ser311 with Ala or specific siRNA knock-down of SPAK dramatically reduces TCR/CD28-induced AP-1 activation, suggesting SPAK is involved in T cell signaling as well (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by electron-dense pericentriolar material and functions as the microtubule-organizing center responsible for microtubule nucleation and spindle organization during cell cycle progression (1). Percentriolar material 1 (PCM-1) is a large, 228 kDa protein associated with the centrosome in a cell cycle dependent manner (2). PCM-1 localizes to small cytoplasmic granules called centrosomal satellites (3). PCM-1 is required for the assembly of several centrosomal proteins including centrin, pericentrin, ninein, NEK2, and CEP250 (4-8). Chromosomal translocations involving genes encoding PCM-1 and the tyrosine kinases Ret and Jak2 are associated with some cancers, including papillary thyroid carcinoma and myeloid leukemia (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by electron-dense pericentriolar material and functions as the microtubule-organizing center responsible for microtubule nucleation and spindle organization during cell cycle progression (1). Percentriolar material 1 (PCM-1) is a large, 228 kDa protein associated with the centrosome in a cell cycle dependent manner (2). PCM-1 localizes to small cytoplasmic granules called centrosomal satellites (3). PCM-1 is required for the assembly of several centrosomal proteins including centrin, pericentrin, ninein, NEK2, and CEP250 (4-8). Chromosomal translocations involving genes encoding PCM-1 and the tyrosine kinases Ret and Jak2 are associated with some cancers, including papillary thyroid carcinoma and myeloid leukemia (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PDLIM2, also known as Mystique, contains an amino-terminal PDZ domain and a carboxy-terminal LIM domain. PDLIM2 was orginally found to be associated with cytoskeletal proteins in epithelial cells to promote cell attachment and migration (1,2). Subsequent studies have shown that PDLIM2 can also inhibit NF-κB activity by acting as a nuclear ubiquitin E3 ligase for p65 (3). PDLIM2 is suppressed in cancer cell lines by DNA methylation (4,5). Expression of PDLIM2 can inhibit anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ack1 and Ack2 (activated cdc42-associated kinase 1 and 2) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that consist of a tyrosine kinase core, an SH3 domain, a cdc42/Rac-binding (CRIB) domain, a Ralt homology region and a proline-rich region (1,2). Ack1 and 2 are the only two tyrosine kinases known to interact with cdc42. Both Acks are activated by growth factors including EGF and PDGF, as well as by activated integrins through cell adhesion, and may serve to link receptor tyrosine kinase or G protein-coupled receptor signaling with cdc42. Acks may regulate cell growth, morphology and motility (3,4). Recent findings indicate that Ack1 may play a role in prostate tumorigenesis, making it a potential drug target for this type of cancer (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Catenin δ-1 (p120 catenin) has an amino-terminal coiled-coil domain followed by a regulatory domain containing multiple phosphorylation sites and a central Armadillo repeat domain of ten linked 42-amino acid repeats. The carboxy-terminal tail has no known function (1). Catenin δ-1 fulfills critical roles in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion as it regulates E-cadherin turnover at the cell surface to determine the level of E-cadherin available for cell-cell adhesion (2). Catenin δ-1 has both positive and negative effects on cadherin-mediated adhesion (3). Actin dynamics are also regulated by catenin δ-1, which modulates RhoA, Rac, and cdc42 proteins (1). Analogous to β-catenin, catenin δ-1 translocates to the nucleus, although its role at this location is unclear. Many studies show that catenin δ-1 is expressed irregularly or is absent in various types of tumor cells, suggesting that catenin δ-1 may function as a tumor suppressor (4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cortactin is a cortical actin binding protein. Its amino-terminal acidic domain (NTA) associates with the Arp2/3 and WASP complex at F-actin branches. The central region of the protein contains six repeats of 37 amino acids that are important in F-actin binding and cross-linking. The carboxy-terminus contains a proline-rich region and an SH3 domain that can interact with numerous scaffolding proteins, such as CortBP1 and Shank3 (1,2). Cortactin is involved in signaling events that coordinate actin reorganization during cell movement. The human cortactin homologue EMS1 is overexpressed in numerous cancers with poor patient prognosis (3). Cortactin may also play an important role in the organization of transmembrane receptors at postsynaptic densities (PSD) and tight junctions by linking scaffolding proteins to the actin network (4).Cortactin is phosphorylated at tyrosine residues 421, 466, and 482. Tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin regulates cell motility (5), rac1-mediated actin dynamics (6), cadherin-dependent adhesion (7), chemokine trafficking and chemokine-dependent chemotaxis (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CrkII, a cellular homologue of v-Crk, belongs to a family of adaptor proteins with an SH2-SH3-SH3 domain structure that transmits signals from tyrosine kinases (1). The primary function of Crk is to recruit cytoplasmic proteins in the vicinity of tyrosine kinases through SH2-phospho-tyrosine interaction. Thus, the output from Crk depends on the SH3-binding proteins, which include the C3G and Sos guanine nucleotide exchange proteins, Abl tyrosine kinase, DOCK180 and some STE20-related kinases. The variety of Crk-binding proteins indicates the pleiotropic function of Crk (2). The two CrkII SH3 domains are separated by a 54 amino acid linker region, which is highly conserved in Xenopus, chicken and mammalian CrkII proteins (3). Tyrosine 221 in this region is phosphorylated by the Abl tyrosine kinase (4), IGF-I receptor (5) and EGF receptor (6). Once Tyr221 is phosphorylated, CrkII undergoes a change in intramolecular folding and SH2-pTyr interaction, which causes rapid dissociation of CrkII from the tyrosine kinase complex (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Filamins are a family of dimeric actin binding proteins that function as structural components of cell adhesion sites. They also serve as a scaffold for subcellular targeting of signaling molecules (1). The actin binding domain (α-actinin domain) located at the amino terminus is followed by as many as 24 tandem repeats of about 96 residues and the dimerization domain is located at the carboxy terminus. In addition to actin filaments, filamins associate with other structural and signaling molecules such as β-integrins, Rho/Rac/Cdc42, PKC and the insulin receptor, primarily through the carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (1-3). Filamin A, the most abundant, and filamin B are widely expressed isoforms, while filamin C is predominantly expressed in muscle (1). Filamin A is phosphorylated by PAK1 at Ser2152, which is required for PAK1-mediated actin cytoskeleton reorganization (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).