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Product listing: Tensin 2 Antibody, UniProt ID Q63HR2 #11990 to SignalSilence® PAK2 siRNA I, UniProt ID Q13177 #6467

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tensin 2 belongs to the Tensin family of cytoskeletal proteins that includes Tensin 1-3 and Cten, which couple integrins to the actin cytoskeleton (1). Tensin proteins contain SH2 and phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains, which enable interaction with diverse signaling molecules and proteins. Tensin family proteins play important roles in signal transduction, cell proliferation, and motility (2-5).Tensin 2 is localized to focal adhesions of various tissues with highest expression in the heart, kidney, and liver (6,7). Tensin 2 inhibits Akt/PKB signaling via a phosphatase tensin-type domain (8). However, Tensin 2 also mediates thrombopoietin/c-Mpl signaling, which promotes Akt signaling (9). Interaction with Tensin 2 is essential for the tumor suppressor function of Deleted in Cancer 1 (DLC1) (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TIAM1 (T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein 1) is a multidomain guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) protein that activates Rac1, a GTPase involved in cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate cell migration, growth and survival. TIAM1 also has been identified as an inhibitor of the YAP/TAZ signaling pathway, with two distinct subcellular mechanisms of action: (1) promoting cytoplasmic (proteosomal) degradation of YAP and TAZ; and (2) blocking the transcriptional co-activator functions of YAP and TAZ in the nucleus (3,4). The effects of TIAM1 on tumor development are also complex and context-dependent. For example, it has been reported that TIAM1 can promote tumor growth and progression in some contexts, while antagonizing tumor metastasis and invasion in other contexts (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomodulin-1 (TMOD1) belongs to a conserved family of cytoskeletal proteins (TMOD1-4) that play an important role in modulating actin cytoskeleton dynamics. TMOD proteins function as actin capping proteins, which stabilize actin filaments by inhibiting both elongation and depolymerization (1). While many proteins have been identified that cap the rapidly growing barbed end of actin filaments, TMODs are the only proteins thus far identified that cap the slowly growing pointed end (2). A research study in triple-negative breast cancer cells identified TMOD1 as a target of NF-κB signaling, and showed that increased TMOD1 expression was associated with enhanced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model (3). Molecular expression of TMOD1 was also identified as part of a unique gene expression signature that could discriminate ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma from other malignancy subtypes (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Twinfilin is an actin monomer-binding protein found in all eukaryotes (1). Mammals have three isoforms. Twinfilin-1 and twinfilin-2a are expressed in most non-muscle cell types, whereas twinfilin-2b is the main isoform in adult heart and skeletal muscle (2). Twinfilins are composed of two ADF-homology domains connected by a 30 kDa linker region. All twinfilins have been shown to form a 1:1 complex with G-actin, but not F-actin (reviewed in 3). Twinfilin-1 was originally known as A6 protein tyrosine kinase and thought to be part of a novel class of protein kinases. However, the protein was renamed after further studies showed no evidence of tyrosine kinase activity (4). Twinfilin-1 helps to prevent the actin filament assembly by forming a complex with actin monomers and, in mammals, has been shown to cap the filament barbed ends. It has been suggested that this regulates cell motility (5). Suppression of twinfilin-1 has also been shown to slow lymphoma cell migration to lymph nodes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) was originally characterized as a substrate of both cGMP- and cAMP-dependent kinases (PKG and PKA, or cGPK and cAPK, respectively) (1). It is now believed that VASP belongs to the Ena/VASP family of adaptor proteins linking the cytoskeletal system to the signal transduction pathways and that it functions in cytoskeletal organization, fibroblast migration, platelet activation and axon guidance (2,3). Three phosphorylation sites, Ser157, Ser239, and Thr278, have been identified. Ser239 is the major PKG phosphorylation site while Ser157 is the major PKA phosphorylation site (4). Evidence suggests that VASP phosphorylation reduces its association with actin and has a negative effect on actin polymerization (5). Phosphorylation at Ser239 of VASP is a useful marker for monitoring PKG activation and signaling (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Villin is a member of the gelsolin family of calcium-regulated actin-binding proteins. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed gelsolin, villin expression is restricted to simple epithelia of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It is localized to the apical cytoplasm and brush borders of these cells. Villin functions in the regulation of actin dynamics in the apical epithelium, capping, nucleating and/or severing actin filaments in a calcium-dependent manner and regulating cell shape in response to external stimuli (1,2). Phosphorylation of villin at Tyr60, 81 and 256 may be involved in the regulation of cell migration (3). Expression of villin is increased in colorectal cancers (4), and villin1 function appears to be involved in progressive cholestasis and hepatic failure (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin proteins are major components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. At least six vertebrate actin isoforms have been identified. The cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin proteins are referred to as “non-muscle” actin proteins as they are predominantly expressed in non-muscle cells where they control cell structure and motility (1). The α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin proteins are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively. The smooth muscle α-actin and γ-actin proteins are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. The α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) is also known as aortic smooth muscle actin. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. As a critical part of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC), the third member of the tubulin superfamily, γ-tubulin, is required for microtubule nucleation as well as centrosome duplication and spindle assembly (1,2, reviewed in 3). γ-tubulin forms complexes of two different sizes: γ-tubulin small complex (γ-TuSC) and the larger γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC). Each complex consists of a number of γ-tubulin complex proteins (GCPs) with γ-tubulin itself being considered GCP1. GCP2-6 all share sequence similarity in 5 different regions and it is thought that these areas could play a role in the proper folding of the proteins (4). γ-TuSC is composed of two γ-tubulin molecules as well as GCP2 and GCP3. γ-TuRC is made up of a ring of multiple copies of γ-TuSC in addition to GCP4, 5, and 6. Another protein, GCP-WD/NEDD1, which lacks sequence similarity with the other GCPs, associates with the γ-TuRC. GCP-WD/NEDD1 has been shown to regulate localization of the γ-TuSC to spindles and centrosomes (5-8). In mammals, phosphorylation of γ-tubulin at Ser131 by SADB controls the activity of the γ-TuRC. The hypothesis is that this phosphorylation stabilizes the protein in a conformation that stimulates centrosome amplification (9).

$108
250 PCR reactions
500 µl
SimpleChIP® Human γ-Actin Intron 3 Primers contain a mix of forward and reverse PCR primers that are specific to intron 3 of the human γ-actin gene. These primers can be used to amplify DNA that has been isolated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Primers have been optimized for use in SYBR® Green quantitative real-time PCR and have been tested in conjunction with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits #9002 and #9003 and ChIP-validated antibodies from Cell Signaling Technology®. The γ-actin gene is actively transcribed in all cell types and the intron 3 region is highly enriched for histone modifications found in the body of active genes, such as histone H3 Lys36 tri-methylation and histone H2B Lys120 ubiquitination.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to either identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome or to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). ChIP can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors, and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. Fragmented chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or quantitative real-time PCR are often used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8). SimpleChIP® primers have been optimized for amplification of ChIP-isolated DNA using real-time quantitative PCR and provide important positive and negative controls that can be used to confirm a successful ChIP experiment.

The Rho-GTPase Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to examine aspects of cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation in cells. This kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per each primary antibody.
$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Cofilin siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit cofilin expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Cofilin siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit cofilin expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Ezrin siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit ezrin expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Moesin siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit moesin expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® OSR1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit OSR1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: SPAK (STE20/SPS1-related Pro/Ala-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive 1) are members of the GCK family serine/threonine kinases. Overexpression and in vitro studies demonstrate that SPAK is able to activate p38 MAP kinase indicating a possible role for SPAK in the stress response (1). Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that SPAK and OSR1 bind to Na-K-2Cl cotransporters NKCC1 and NKCC2 and K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 (2). WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate SPAK at Thr243/247 and Ser380 (3-5). Similarly, WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate OSR1 at Thr185 and Ser315 (3,4). Phosphorylation at these sites stimulates SPAK and OSR1 activity, leading to NKCC1 phosphorylation and enhanced NKCC1 activity (3-5). SPAK is also phosphorylated at Ser311 by PKCθ in response to T cell activation. Substitution of Ser311 with Ala or specific siRNA knock-down of SPAK dramatically reduces TCR/CD28-induced AP-1 activation, suggesting SPAK is involved in T cell signaling as well (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PAK1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PAK1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PAK1 siRNA I (Mouse Specific) from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PAK1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PAK2 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PAK2 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).