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Product listing: PTMScan® Phospho-PKA Substrate Motif (RRXS*/T*) Kit #5565 to VEGF Receptor 1 Antibody, UniProt ID P17948 #2893

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/common/content/content.jsp?id=ptmscan-services.
$320
100 µg
This peptide is used to specifically block Survivin (71G4) Rabbit mAb #2808 reactivity.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Survivin is a 16 kDa anti-apoptotic protein highly expressed during fetal development and cancer cell malignancy (1). Survivin binds and inhibits caspase-3, controlling the checkpoint in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and promoting cell division (2,3). This regulatory process requires the phosphorylation of survivin at Thr34 by p34 cdc2 kinase (4). Gene targeting using a Thr34 phosphorylation-defective survivin mutant, as well as antisense survivin, have been shown to inhibit tumor growth (5,6).

This peptide is used to block Phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) (D26) Rabbit mAb #3077 reactivity in western and dot blot protocols.

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).

$320
100 µg
This peptide is used to block Phospho-Histone H3 (Ser10) (D2C8) XP Rabbit mAb #3377 reactivity.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), also known as HSP75, is a mitochondrial chaperone and ATPase that was originally identified as a protein that interacts with the TNF receptor. Although a member of the HSP90 family, TRAP1 is not heat-inducible but is upregulated by glucose deprivation, oxidative injury, and UV irradiation. An amino-terminal mitochondrial localization sequence results in localization of TRAP1 within mitochondria (1). Overexpression of TRAP1 decreases oxidative stress, suggesting a protective role in ischemia injury (2). Research studies demonstrate that silencing of TRAP1 enhances cytochrome C release and apoptosis, with additional evidence indicating that TRAP1 can protect cells from cell death by inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (3). TRAP1 is a substrate of the mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase PINK1, whose corresponding gene is mutated in some forms of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). PINK1 protects cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death by suppressing release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. PD-linked PINK1 mutations impair the ability of PINK1 to phosphorylate TRAP1 and leads to impaired cell survival (4). Finally, TRAP1 alleviates α-synuclein induced toxicity and rescues the PINK1 loss-of-function phenotype (5).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD31 (Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1: PECAM-1), a member of the Ig superfamily of cell adhesion molecules, is expressed by circulating platelets, monocytes, neutrophils, some T cells, and endothelial cells and modulates cell adhesion, endothelial cell migration, and angiogenesis (1). CD31 is phosphorylated on Tyr686 at the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal tail upon various stimuli (e.g. mechanical or oxidative stress), presumably by Src family members (2). The tyrosine phosphorylation mediates associations with a number of SH2 domain-containing binding partners such as PI3 kinase, SHIP, PLCγ, and SHP-2. Thus, CD31 serves as a scaffold for various signaling molecules (3).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Also known as plakoglobin, γ-catenin is a member of the Armadillo family of signaling molecules, which includes β-catenin and the Drosophila protein armadillo (1). This family of proteins is involved in Wnt signaling, which is important in embryonic development and in tumorigenesis (2-3). Although the two vertebrate proteins β- and γ-catenin display sequence homology, γ-catenin likely plays a role distinct from that of β-catenin (1, 4-6). γ-catenin localizes to desmosomes and adherens junctions, both sites of intercellular adhesion, and interacts with the cytoplasmic domains of classical and desmosomal cadherins. Interaction of γ- or β-catenin with α-catenin, desmoplakin and other junction proteins provides a link between intercellular junctions and the actin and intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Maintenance and/or modification of this link is vital for control of cell adhesion and migration (1). γ-catenin is modified by phosphorylation, affecting both adhesion and β-catenin dependent transcription (7), and by and O-glycosylation, affecting adhesion (8). Recent evidence suggests that γ-catenin regulates desmosomal adhesion in response to growth factor stimulation (9).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: βIG-H3 (TGFBI/RGD-CAP/Kerato-epithelin) is a 683-amino acid secretory protein induced by TGF-β that plays a role in cell adhesion, differentiation, and apoptosis (1-4). βIG-H3 contains an internal cysteine-rich EMI domain followed by four fasciclin-1 domains and a carboxy terminal RGD domain (1,2). It contributes to cell adhesion through interactions with integrins as well as a number of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen, fibronectin, and laminin (5-7). ECM βIG-H3 is found in a wide variety of tissues (8-12). Mutations in the βIG-H3 gene as well as elevated protein levels are most notably associated with corneal dystrophies (13).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cellular oncogene c-Yes and its viral homologue v-Yes (the transforming gene of Yamaguchi 73 and Esh avian sarcoma viruses) encode a 60 kDa, cytoplasmic, membrane-associated, protein-tyrosine kinase (1). Yes belongs to the Src kinase family and is ubiquitously expressed in many tissues and cells. Like other Src family members, Yes contains several conserved functional domains such as an N-terminal myristoylation sequence for membrane targeting, SH2 and SH3 domains, a kinase domain, and a C-terminal non-catalytic domain (2). Although several lines of evidence support redundancy in signaling between Yes and other Src family kinases, there is also a growing body of evidence indicating specificity in Yes signaling (2). Yes is activated downstream of a multitude of cell surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases, G protein-coupled receptors, and cytokine receptors (3). In addition, both Yes and Src kinases are activated during the cell cycle transition from G2 to M phase (3). Investigators have found that dysfunction of Yes is associated with the development of various cancers (4).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) is a DNA repair protein important in both single strand break repair and base excision repair following damage from ionizing radiation and alkylating agents (1). XRCC1 acts as a scaffold protein to coordinate DNA abasic site repair through interaction with several other repair proteins (2). At least eight XRCC1 protein partners have been identified, including the polynucleotide kinase PNK (3), DNA ligase III (4,5), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (6), and PCNA (7). Mutations and polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene serve as diagnostic markers and are associated with elevated risk of various forms of cancers (8).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human WSTF gene is located within the common Williams Syndrome (WS) deletion area at chromosome 7q11.23. Several WSTF gene products have been detected with little difference in length of polypeptides (1-3). Functional motifs identified by sequence-homology searches include a PHD-type zinc finger motif followed by a bromodomain. Both motifs are found in many transcription factors, suggesting that WSTF may function as a transcription factor. A Drosophila gene (acf1) was cloned, which encodes two forms of Acf1 proteins with molecular weight 170 kDa and 185 kDa, respectively (4). It was demonstrated that Acf1 is structurally related to the human WSTF gene. Acf1 forms a complex with another protein, ISWI, and functions in the ATP-dependent catalysis of chromatin assembly (4).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Wnt family includes several secreted glycoproteins that play important roles in animal development (1). There are 19 Wnt genes in the human genome that encode functionally distinct Wnt proteins (2). Wnt members bind to the Frizzled family of seven-pass transmembrane proteins and activate several signaling pathways (3). The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway also requires a coreceptor from the low-density lipoprotein receptor family (4). Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling pathways is involved in several types of cancers (5).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Wnt family includes several secreted glycoproteins that play important roles in animal development (1). There are 19 Wnt genes in the human genome that encode functionally distinct Wnt proteins (2). Wnt members bind to the Frizzled family of seven-pass transmembrane proteins and activate several signaling pathways (3). The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway also requires a coreceptor from the low-density lipoprotein receptor family (4). Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling pathways is involved in several types of cancers (5).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: WIF1 (Wnt inhibitory factor 1) is a secreted protein that binds to Wnt proteins and inhibits their activity (1). It contains an N-terminal WIF domain and five EGF-like repeats (2). The WIF1 ortholog in Drosophila, Shifted, is required for Hedgehog stability and diffusion (3,4). It has been reported that WIF1 expression is downregulated in many types of cancers (5-8).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vaccinia-related kinase (VRK) proteins are a new group of Ser/Thr kinases in the human kinome. This mammalian kinase family comprises three members, VRK1, VRK2, and VRK3 (1-3). The VRK1 has autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylates several transcription factors, including p53 (4), ATF2 (5), and c-Jun (6). VRK2 is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (7). VRK3 suppresses Erk activity through direct interaction and activation of the MAP kinase phosphatase VHR (8). Further functional and structural analysis of VRK proteins will elucidate important new aspects of cell regulation.

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Villin is a member of the gelsolin family of calcium-regulated actin-binding proteins. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed gelsolin, villin expression is restricted to simple epithelia of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It is localized to the apical cytoplasm and brush borders of these cells. Villin functions in the regulation of actin dynamics in the apical epithelium, capping, nucleating and/or severing actin filaments in a calcium-dependent manner and regulating cell shape in response to external stimuli (1,2). Phosphorylation of villin at Tyr60, 81 and 256 may be involved in the regulation of cell migration (3). Expression of villin is increased in colorectal cancers (4), and villin1 function appears to be involved in progressive cholestasis and hepatic failure (5).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific mitogen for vascular endothelial cells. VEGF and its close relatives VEGF-B, -C and -D form a subfamily within PDGF family of growth factors, which belongs to the cysteine knot class of cytokines. Five VEGF isoforms of 121, 145, 165, 189 and 206 amino acids (VEGF121–206) are generated as a result of alternative splicing from a single VEGF gene (1).The various VEGF forms bind to three tyrosine-kinase receptors, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 which are expressed almost exclusively in endothelial cells. VEGFR-2 is the main angiogenic signal transducer for VEGF, while VEGFR-3 is specific for VEGF-C and -D and is necessary and sufficient for lymphangiogenic signaling. However, upon proteolytic processing VEGF-C and -D gain the ability to also bind and activate VEGFR-2 (2). Guided by the binding properties of the ligands, the VEGFRs are able to form both homodimers and heterodimers. Receptor dimerization is accompanied by activation of receptor kinase activity leading to receptor autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated receptors recruit interacting proteins and induce downstream signaling (3). Recently, tumor therapies based on neutralizing anti-VEGF antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting VEGFRs have been developed. These new strategies for tumor treatment show the clinical relevance of inhibiting VEGF signal transduction pathways that are exaggerated in pathological angiogenesis (4).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific mitogen for vascular endothelial cells. VEGF and its close relatives VEGF-B, -C and -D form a subfamily within PDGF family of growth factors, which belongs to the cysteine knot class of cytokines. Five VEGF isoforms of 121, 145, 165, 189 and 206 amino acids (VEGF121–206) are generated as a result of alternative splicing from a single VEGF gene (1).The various VEGF forms bind to three tyrosine-kinase receptors, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 which are expressed almost exclusively in endothelial cells. VEGFR-2 is the main angiogenic signal transducer for VEGF, while VEGFR-3 is specific for VEGF-C and -D and is necessary and sufficient for lymphangiogenic signaling. However, upon proteolytic processing VEGF-C and -D gain the ability to also bind and activate VEGFR-2 (2). Guided by the binding properties of the ligands, the VEGFRs are able to form both homodimers and heterodimers. Receptor dimerization is accompanied by activation of receptor kinase activity leading to receptor autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated receptors recruit interacting proteins and induce downstream signaling (3). Recently, tumor therapies based on neutralizing anti-VEGF antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting VEGFRs have been developed. These new strategies for tumor treatment show the clinical relevance of inhibiting VEGF signal transduction pathways that are exaggerated in pathological angiogenesis (4).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) is a 195 kDa membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. VEGF receptors are characterized by the presence of seven extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains followed by a membrane-spanning domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain (1). VEGF receptor 3 expression is largely restricted to adult lymphatic endothelium and is thought to control lymphangiogenesis (1,2). Binding of VEGF-C/VEGF-D to VEGFR3 results in transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in its intracellular domain, recruitment of signaling molecules and activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling cascades (1,3).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$255
10 western blots
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor (VEGFR-1, Flt-1) is a 180 kDa receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the VEGFR (Flt) family (1-3). The receptor is comprised of seven extracellular Ig-like domains, a single transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail containing the active kinase domain (1,2). VEGFR-1 plays an important role in endothelial cell function and normal vascular development, as well as in hematopoietic function (2,3). VEGF-A is a high affinity ligand of VEGFR-1. VEGFR-1 also binds VEGF-B and PLGF (2). Ligand binding results in very little VEGFR-1 kinase activation, and VEGFR-1/VEGF-A binding negatively regulates VEGF function by diverting the growth factor from other functional VEGF receptors (3).