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Product listing: Phospho-p38 MAPK (Thr180/Tyr182) (28B10) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate), UniProt ID O15264 #4551 to TACE Antibody, UniProt ID P78536 #3976

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human and mouse cells. The unconjugated antibody #9216 reacts with human, mouse, rat, D. melanogaster, monkey, S. cerevisiae and zebra fish phospho-p38 MAPK (Thr180/Tyr182). CST expects that Phospho-p38 MAPK (Thr180/Tyr182) (28B10) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) will also recognize p44/42 MAPK in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$121
250 µl
Anti-rat IgG (H+L) antibody was conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye under optimal conditions and formulated at 2 mg/mL.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sine oculis homeobox (SIX) proteins belong to a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors discovered in Drosophila mutant screens for embryonic eye development genes (1-3). The prototypical family member (sine oculis, so) was named for eyeless embryos carrying mutations in a gene highly conserved among vertebrates, including humans (SIX1) (4). A total of six family members (SIX1-6) have been identified in vertebrates. Each SIX protein contains a homeobox nucleic acid recognition domain (HD) with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif and an adjacent SIX domain, which may be involved in regulating protein-protein interactions (5). In addition to their critical functions during embryonic organogenesis, research studies suggest that SIX proteins play additional roles in postnatal cell cycle regulation, with potentially important implications in tumorigenesis (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: CXCR5 is a G protein-coupled receptor belonging to the chemokine receptor subfamily (1). Upon binding of its ligand, the chemokine CXCL13, CXCR5 initiates multiple intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell proliferation, survival, and migration (2). CXCR5 is expressed in both mature B cells and follicular helper T cells, and respond to CXCL13 gradient to control lymphocyte migration towards secondary lymphoid tissues (3). CXCR5 has also been shown to be highly expressed in primary breast tumors, in correlation with their propensity to grow and metastasize (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), also known as CD66e or CEACAM5, is a 180-200 kDa cell surface glycoprotein whose expression is elevated in intestinal carcinomas and other tumors. CEA mediates cell adhesion, though little more is known about its biological activity. Expression of CEA is correlated with tumerogenicity (1), and it has been shown to play a role in cell migration, adhesion and invasion in culture cells, as well as in metastasis in vivo (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), which contains five immunoglobulin-like domains, is a highly glycosylated protein (1). MAG is a component of all myelinated internodes, whether formed by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) or by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (2), and has several functions. A known function of MAG is its inhibition of axonal regeneration after injury. It inhibits axonal outgrowth from adult dorsal root ganglion and in postnatal cerebellar, retinal, spinal, hippocampal, and superior cervical ganglion neurons (3). Interaction between MAG and several other molecules on the innermost wrap of myelin and complementary receptors on the opposing axon surface are required for long-term axon stability. Without MAG, myelin is still expressed, but long-term axon degeneration and altered axon cytoskeleton structure can be seen (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CBARA1/MICU1 is a mitochondrial protein associated to the mitochondrial inner membrane that is comprised of two EF hand helix-loop-helix motifs. CBARA1/MICU1 is involved in mitochondrial calcium entry, metabolic coupling between cytosolic calcium transients, and activation of matrix dehydrogenases (1). Mitochondrial CBARA1/MICU1 is required to preserve normal mitochondrial calcium concentration below the equilibrium level by interacting with the uniporter pore-forming subunit MCU (2). CBARA1/MICU1 is important in pancreatic β-cell mitochondrial calcium uptake and sustained insulin secretion (3).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are a family of more than 100 proteins whose normal expression is largely restricted to immune privileged germ cells of the testis, ovary, and trophoblast cells of the placenta. Although most normal somatic tissues are void of CTA expression, due to epigenetic silencing of gene expression, their expression is upregulated in a wide variety of human solid and liquid tumors (1,2). As such, CTAs have garnered much attention as attractive targets for a variety of immunotherapy-based approaches to selectively attack tumors (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paxillin is a multidomain protein that localizes primarily to focal adhesion sites in the extracellular matrix (1). Paxillin is one of the key components of integrin signaling, and tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin is required for integrin-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization (2). Paxillin is phosphorylated by another focal adhesion component, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), at Tyr118 (3,4). Phospho-Paxillin (Tyr118) may provide a docking site for recruitment of other signaling molecules to focal adhesions. It has been shown that the SH2 domain of Crk binds to the phosphorylated Tyr118 of paxillin (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GLI was first identified as a gene amplified in a malignant glioma (1) capable of transforming primary cells in cooperation with adenovirus E1A (2). GLI belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger proteins that includes three mammalian GLI proteins: GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3 (3). These GLI proteins are similar to the Drosophila homolog Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and function as transcription factors activated by the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in animal development, and research studies have shown that this pathway is aberrantly activated in many types of cancers (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The tumor necrosis factor receptor family, which includes TNF-RI, Fas, DR3, DR4, DR5, and DR6, plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis in various physiological systems (1,2). The receptors are activated by a family of cytokines that include TNF, FasL, and TRAIL. They are characterized by a highly conserved extracellular region containing cysteine-rich repeats and a conserved intracellular region of about 80 amino acids termed the death domain (DD). The DD is important for transducing the death signal by recruiting other DD containing adaptor proteins (FADD, TRADD, RIP) to the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), resulting in activation of caspases.

$714
24 assays
1 Kit
Next generation sequencing (NG-seq) is a high throughput method that can be used downstream of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to identify and quantify target DNA enrichment across the entire genome. The SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq DNA Library Prep Kit for Illumina® contains all of the enzymes and buffers necessary to generate high quality DNA sequencing libraries from ChIP DNA for next-generation sequencing on the Illumina® platform. The fast, user-friendly workflow minimizes hands-on time needed for generation and purification of DNA libraries. This product must be used in combination with SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq Multiplex Oligos for Illumina® (Single Index Primers) #29580 or SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq Multiplex Oligos for Illumina® (Dual Index Primers) #47538.This product provides sufficient amounts of reagents for 24 reactions and is compatible with both enzymatic- and sonication-fragmented, ChIP-enriched DNA. This product is compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9003, SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9005, and SimpleChIP® Plus Sonication Chromatin IP Kit #56383. This product is not compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9002 and SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9004 because agarose beads are blocked with sonicated salmon sperm DNA, which will contaminate DNA library preps and NG-seq.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$524
100 assays (96 well format)
1 Kit
The Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Activity Assay Kit contains the necessary reagents for rapid, sensitive, and simple detection of G6PD activity in various samples. In the assay, glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), in the presence of NADP, is oxidized by G6PD to generate 6-phosphogluconolactone and NADPH. The generated NADPH is then amplified by the diaphorase-cycling system to produce highly fluorescent resorufin molecules (see Figure 1). The relative fluorescent units (RFU) can then be determined using a plate reader with excitation about 540 nm and emission about 590 nm. The magnitude of RFU is proportional to G6PD activity in the sample.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Background: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyses the first, and rate-limiting, step of the pentose phosphate pathway (1). The NADPH generated from this reaction is essential to protect cells from oxidative stress (1). Research studies have shown that p53 interacts with G6PD and inhibits its activity, therefore suppressing glucose consumption through the pentose phosphate pathway (2). In cancer cells with p53 mutations, the increased glucose consumption is directed towards increased biosynthesis, which is critical for cancer cell proliferation (2).

$314
100 µg
ER-Tracker™ Green (BODIPY® FL Glibenclamide) is recommended for live cell imaging only; fixation with aldehydes or alcohols will inhibit staining. Excitation: 504 nm, Emission: 511 nm, Molecular Weight: 783.10 g/mol
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Tubulin (DM1A) Mouse mAb #3873.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes. These proteins are involved in the formation of autophagosomes, which are cytoplasmic vacuoles that are delivered to lysosomes for degradation. The class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34 regulates vacuolar trafficking and autophagy (4,5). Multiple proteins associate with Vps34, including p105/Vps15, Beclin-1, UVRAG, Atg14, and Rubicon (6-12). Atg14 and Rubicon were identified based on their ability to bind to Beclin-1 and participate in unique complexes with opposing functions (9-12). Rubicon, which localizes to the endosome and lysosome, inhibits Vps34 lipid kinase activity; knockdown of Rubicon enhances autophagy and endocytic trafficking (11,12). In contrast, Atg14 localizes to autophagosomes, isolation membranes, and ER and can enhance Vps34 activity. Knockdown of Atg14 inhibits starvation-induced autophagy (11,12).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Smad1 (Ser463/465)/ Smad5 (Ser463/465)/ Smad9 (Ser465/467) (D5B10) Rabbit mAb #13820.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) constitute a large family of signaling molecules that regulate a wide range of critical processes including morphogenesis, cell-fate determination, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis (1,2). BMP receptors are members of the TGF-β family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors. Ligand binding induces multimerization, autophosphorylation, and activation of these receptors (3-5). They subsequently phosphorylate Smad1 at Ser463 and Ser465 in the carboxy-terminal motif SSXS, as well as Smad5 and Smad9 (Smad8) at their corresponding sites. These phosphorylated Smads dimerize with the coactivating Smad4 and translocate to the nucleus, where they stimulate transcription of target genes (5).MAP kinases and CDKs 8 and 9 phosphorylate residues in the linker region of Smad1, including Ser206. The phosphorylation of Ser206 recruits Smurf1 to the linker region and leads to the degradation of Smad1 (6). Phosphorylation of this site also promotes Smad1 transcriptional action by recruiting YAP to the linker region (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex plays a critical role in cell growth regulation (1,2). mTORC1 activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids (3,4). Four related GTPases (RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD) interact with raptor in mTORC1, which is necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2). The GAP Activity Towards Rags (GATOR) complex interacts with Rag GTPases and is made up of a pair of protein subcomplexes (5). The GATOR1 subcomplex includes the proteins DEPDC5, Nprl2 and Nprl3, and is a RagA and RagB GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that negatively regulates mTORC1 signaling. Conversely, the GATOR2 subcomplex (including Mios, WDR24, WDR59, Seh1L and Sec13 proteins) is a positive regulator of mTORC1 signaling (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PD-L1 (Extracellular Domain Specific) (D8T4X) Rabbit mAb #86744.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD68 (macrosialin) is a heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein that is expressed by and commonly used as a marker for monocytes and macrophages (1, 2). It is found on the plasma membrane, as well as endosomal and lysosomal membranes (1-3). It is proposed to bind OxLDL and has been observed as a homodimer (3, 4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-7 (CMH-1, Mch3, ICE-LAP3) has been identified as a major contributor to the execution of apoptosis (1-4). Caspase-7, like caspase-3, is an effector caspase that is responsible for cleaving downstream substrates such as (ADP-ribose) polymerase and PARP (1,3). During apoptosis, caspase-7 is activated through proteolytic processing by upstream caspases at Asp23, Asp198, and Asp206 to produce the mature subunits (1,3). Similar to caspase-2 and -3, caspase-7 preferentially cleaves substrates following the recognition sequence DEVD (5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated E-Cadherin (24E10) Rabbit mAb #3195.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Basigin (EMMPRIN, CD147) is a type I integral membrane receptor protein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (1). Basigin is a glycosylated protein with four known isoforms, of which isoform 2 is the most abundantly expressed (2). Multiple functions have been ascribed to Basigin; foremost among these is stimulating the secretion of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases by adjacent fibroblasts, a function which has been implicated in promoting tumor progression (2-4). Research studies have shown that Basigin is overexpressed by many tumor cells, and its expression level may correlate with tumor malignancy (5,6). A recent study identified the BASIGIN gene as a regulatory target of Slug, suggesting a role for Basigin in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (7). Basigin has also been identified as a marker for a subset of highly suppressive regulatory T cells (8), and as an obligate receptor for the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum on human erythrocytes (9).

$364
100 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) Antibody was conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescence in human and mouse cells. The unconjugated Phospho-Histone H3 (Ser10) (D2C8) XP® Rabbit mAb #3377 reacts with phospho-histone H3 (Ser10) from human, mouse, rat, and monkey. CST expects that Phospho-Histone H3 (Ser10) (D2C8) XP® Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 555 Conjugate) will also recognize phospho-histone H3 (Ser10) in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TACE (TNF-α converting enzyme), also known as ADAM17, is a transmembrane metalloprotease that plays a key role in the cleavage of a number cell surface molecules in a process known as “shedding". TACE is abundantly expressed in many adult tissues, but in fetal development expression is differentially regulated (1). An important substrate of TACE is pro-TNF-α (1). Increased expression of TACE is associated with several pathological conditions including osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, where the pro-inflammatory effects of increased TNF-α contribute to disease pathogenesis (2,3). Regulation of other important molecules by TACE such as EGFR and Notch has recently been documented. TACE is responsible for the shedding of EGFR ligands such as amphiregulin and TNF-α. Some tumors have hyperactivated EGFR due to upregulated TNF-α production and upregulated TACE, making TACE a potential target for drug development (4). TACE activates Notch in a ligand-independent manner and has been shown to play a role in the development of the Drosophila nervous system (5). TACE has also been proposed to act as α-secretase for amyloid precursor protein (APP) (6), and to be involved in the renewal and proliferation of neural stem cells (7).