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Product listing: FoxP3 (D6O8R) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9BZS1 #12653 to Keratin 5 (D4U8Q) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P13647 #25807

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors containing a sequence known as Forkhead box or winged helix DNA binding domain (1). The human genome contains 43 Fox proteins that are divided into subfamilies. The FoxP subfamily has four members, FoxP1 - FoxP4, which are broadly expressed and play important roles in organ development, immune response and cancer pathogenesis (2-4). The FoxP subfamily has several characteristics that are atypical among Fox proteins: their Forkhead domain is located at the carboxy-terminal region and they contain motifs that promote homo- and heterodimerization. FoxP proteins usually function as transcriptional repressors (4,5).FoxP3 is crucial for the development of T cells with regulatory properties (Treg) (6). Mutations in FoxP3 are associated with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome (IPEX) (7), while overexpression in mice causes severe immunodeficiency (8). Research studies have shown that FoxP3 functions as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is responsible for the synthesis of the essential neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from L-glutamic acid (1). GAD1 (GAD67) and GAD2 (GAD65) are expressed in nervous and endocrine systems (2) and are thought to be involved in synaptic transmission (3) and insulin secretion (4), respectively. Autoantibodies against GAD2 may serve as markers for type I diabetes (5). Many individuals suffering from an adult onset disorder known as Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) also express autoantibodies to GAD2 (6).

$260
100 µl
$637
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: TNFRSF18, also known as glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-receptor (TNFR)-related protein (GITR) and activation-inducible TNFR family receptor, encodes a type 1 membrane protein of the TNF-receptor superfamily (1). Three alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms have been reported (2). GITR is an immune cell co-stimulatory receptor expressed constitutively at high levels on CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs), at low levels on naive and memory T cells, and is induced upon T cell activation (3-5). Studies show GITR can also be induced on NK cells, macrophages, and DCs (3, 4, 6). Although GITR does not have intrinsic enzymatic activity, TNFSF18 (also known as GITRL) expressed on antigen presenting cells binds to GITR resulting in recruitment of TNFR-associated factor family members and activation of the NF-kappa-B pathway in T cells (7). GITR ligation has been shown to play a role in CD8+ T cell activation, cytoxicity, and memory T cell survival (8-10). In the thymus, GITR is thought to play a key role in dominant immunological self-tolerance through thymic Treg differentiation and expansion (11). Of note, GITR ligation inhibits Treg suppressive function (12-13) and promotes effector T cell resistance to Treg suppression (14-15). Due to the combined effects on both Treg suppression and effector cell activation, GITR represents a unique opportunity for immunotherapeutic intervention in cancer (16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GLI was first identified as a gene amplified in a malignant glioma (1) capable of transforming primary cells in cooperation with adenovirus E1A (2). GLI belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger proteins that includes three mammalian GLI proteins: GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3 (3). These GLI proteins are similar to the Drosophila homolog Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and function as transcription factors activated by the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in animal development, and research studies have shown that this pathway is aberrantly activated in many types of cancers (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucose transporter 1 (Glut1, SLC2A1) is a widely expressed transport protein that displays a broad range of substrate specificity in transporting a number of different aldose sugars as well as an oxidized form of vitamin C into cells (1,2). Glut1 is responsible for the basal-level uptake of glucose from the blood through facilitated diffusion (2). Research studies show that Glut1 and the transcription factor HIF-1α mediate the regulation of glycolysis by O-GlcNAcylation in cancer cells (3). Additional studies demonstrate that Glut1 is required for CD4 T cell activation and is critical for the expansion and survival of T effector (Teff) cells (4). Mutations in the corresponding SLC2A1 gene cause GLUT1 deficiency syndromes (GLUT1DS1, GLUT1DS2), a pair of neurologic disorders characterized by delayed development, seizures, spasticity, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, and acquired microcephaly (5,6). Two other neurologic disorders - dystonia-9 (DYT9) and susceptibility to idiopathic generalized epilepsy 12 (EIG12) - are also caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Golgi apparatus functions in the modification, organization, and transport of proteins and membranes targeted to other parts of the cell, such as the plasma membrane, lysosomes, and endosomes. This regulated transport is important for appropriate protein localization, secretion, and signal transduction. Members of the Golgin family of proteins, including GM130, Giantin, p115, and GRASP65, are defined by their presence in the Golgi matrix and by their long coiled coil domains. Golgin function, which is regulated in part by small GTPases of the Rab and Arl families, includes establishing and maintaining Golgi structure and transport (reviewed in 1). The Golgi cisternae are stacked and linked laterally to form a ribbon. GRASP65 and GM130 are required for membrane fusion events that mediate ribbon formation during Golgi assembly. These lateral fusion events allow for uniform distribution of Golgi enzymes (2). GM130 and Giantin interact with the transport factor p115 to facilitate endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi transport (3). GM130 is also involved in the transport of the Ether-a-go-go-Related (hERG) potassium ion channel. Inappropriate hERG localization may be an underlying cause in Long QT syndrome, a hereditary and potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmia (4). Further, GM130 was implicated in signal transduction regulating invasion, migration, and cell polarization via its interaction with and activation of serine/threonine kinases YSK1 and Mst4 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized by the covalent reaction of formylbenzamide-modified antibody with hydrazide-activated magnetic bead. HA-Tag (C29F4) Rabbit mAb (Magnetic Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays of HA-tagged recombinant proteins.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HDAC6 is a class II histone deacetylase enzyme localized to the cytoplasm and associated with the microtubule network (1). It is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell migration, immune synapse formation, viral infection, and degradation of misfolded proteins (1). HDAC6 contains two tandem catalytic domains that facilitate the deacetylation of multiple protein substrates, including histones and non-histone proteins such as tubulin, cortactin, and HSP90. Despite the ability to deacetylate histone proteins in vitro, there is no evidence for HDAC6-mediated deacetylation of histones in vivo (2,3). The acetylation/deacetylation of tubulin on Lys40 regulates binding and motility of the kinesin-1 motor protein and subsequent transport of cargo proteins such as JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP1) (4). The acetylation/deacetylation of cortactin regulates cell motility by modulating the binding of cortactin to F-actin (5). Acetylation/deacetylation of HSP90 modulates chaperone complex activity by regulating the binding of an essential cochaperone protein, p23 (6,7). In addition to its role as a protein deacetylase, HDAC6 functions as a component of the aggresome, a proteinaceous inclusion body that forms in response to an accumulation of misfolded or partially denatured proteins (8). Formation of the aggresome is a protective response that sequesters cytotoxic protein aggregates for eventual autophagic clearance from the cell. HDAC6 contains a zinc finger ubiquitin-binding domain that binds both mono- and poly-ubiquitinated proteins (8). HDAC6 binds to both poly-ubiquitinated misfolded proteins and dynein motors, facilitating the transport of misfolded proteins to the aggresome (9,10). HDAC6 is also required for subsequent recruitment of the autophagic machinery and clearance of aggresomes from the cell (11). Thus, HDAC6 plays a key role in the protection against the deleterious effects of pathological protein aggregation that occurs in various diseases, such as neurodegenerative Huntington’s disease (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Hemoglobin (Hb, Hgb) is a heme-containing transport protein found primarily in the red blood cells of humans and most other vertebrates. The primary function of hemoglobin is to transport oxygen from the external environment to the body tissues. Hemoglobin also facilitates metabolic waste removal by assisting in the transport of carbon dioxide from tissues back to the respiratory organs (1). Mature hemoglobin is a tetrameric protein complex, with each subunit containing an oxygen-binding heme group (2). Multiple isoforms of hemoglobin exist, which vary in relative abundance depending on developmental stage. Adult hemoglobin (HbA) is comprised of two α subunits and two β subunits and is the predominant hemoglobin found in red blood cells of children and adults. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) contains two α subunits and two γ subunits and is the predominant isoform found during fetal and early postnatal development (2,3). Mutations that alter the structure or abundance of specific globin subunits can result in pathological conditions known as hemoglobinopathies (4). One such disorder is sickle cell disease, which is characterized by structural abnormalities that limit the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells. By contrast, thalassemia disorders are characterized by deficiencies in the abundance of specific hemoglobin subunits (4). Clinical treatments that are designed to alter the expression of specific hemoglobin subunits can be used to treat hemoglobinopathies (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ErbB2 (HER2) proto-oncogene encodes a 185 kDa transmembrane, receptor-like glycoprotein with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (1). While ErbB2 lacks an identified ligand, ErbB2 kinase activity can be activated in the absence of a ligand when overexpressed and through heteromeric associations with other ErbB family members (2). Amplification of the ErbB2 gene and overexpression of its product are detected in almost 40% of human breast cancers (3). Binding of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase to ErbB2 at Tyr1112 leads to ErbB2 poly-ubiquitination and enhances degradation of this kinase (4). ErbB2 is a key therapeutic target in the treatment of breast cancer and other carcinomas and targeting the regulation of ErbB2 degradation by the c-Cbl-regulated proteolytic pathway is one potential therapeutic strategy. Phosphorylation of the kinase domain residue Tyr877 of ErbB2 (homologous to Tyr416 of pp60c-Src) may be involved in regulating ErbB2 biological activity. The major autophosphorylation sites in ErbB2 are Tyr1248 and Tyr1221/1222; phosphorylation of these sites couples ErbB2 to the Ras-Raf-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway (1,5).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HER3/ErbB3 is a member of the ErbB receptor protein tyrosine kinase family, but it lacks tyrosine kinase activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of ErbB3 depends on its association with other ErbB tyrosine kinases. Upon ligand binding, heterodimers form between ErbB3 and other ErbB proteins, and ErbB3 is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by the activated ErbB kinase (1,2). There are at least 9 potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the carboxy-terminal tail of ErbB3. These sites serve as consensus binding sites for signal transducing proteins, including Src family members, Grb2, and the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, which mediate ErbB downstream signaling (3). Both Tyr1222 and Tyr1289 of ErbB3 reside within a YXXM motif and participate in signaling to PI3K (4).Investigators have found that ErbB3 is highly expressed in many cancer cells (5) and activation of the ErbB3/PI3K pathway is correlated with malignant phenotypes of adenocarcinomas (6). Research studies have demonstrated that in tumor development, ErbB3 may function as an oncogenic unit together with other ErbB members (e.g. ErbB2 requires ErbB3 to drive breast tumor cell proliferation) (7). Thus, investigators view inhibiting interaction between ErbB3 and ErbB tyrosine kinases as a novel strategy for anti-tumor therapy.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HES1 (Hairy and Enhancer of Split 1) is one of seven members of the HES family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors which function primarily to repress transcription of bHLH-dependent genes (1). HES1 is understood to play an important conserved role in maintaining pluripotency of embryonic and adult stem/progenitor cells via the transcriptional repression of genes that promote differentiation (1,2). HES1 is particularly well known as a repressive mediator of the canonical Notch signaling pathway (3). HES1 plays a key role in mediating Notch-dependent T cell lineage commitment (4), and has been reported to be an essential mediator of Notch-induced T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) (4,5). HES1 is also reported to mediate Notch-induced repression of differentiation in a number of cancer cell types. A conditional deletion of HES1 from intestinal tumor cells in APC-mutant mice reduced tumor cell proliferation, while promoting differentiation toward epithelial lineages (6). Overexpression of HES1 in a human osteosarcoma (OS) cell line was shown to repress expression of the Notch antagonist Dtx1, leading to increased OS cell invasiveness (7). Other genes subject to transcriptional repression by HES1 include Neurogenin-2, Math1/Atoh1 and the NOTCH ligands DLL1 and Jagged1 (6,8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Western Blotting

Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that plays a critical role in the cellular response to hypoxia (1). The HIF1 complex consists of two subunits, HIF-1α and HIF-1β, which are basic helix-loop-helix proteins of the PAS (Per, ARNT, Sim) family (2). HIF1 regulates the transcription of a broad range of genes that facilitate responses to the hypoxic environment, including genes regulating angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, cell cycle, metabolism, and apoptosis. The widely expressed HIF-1α is typically degraded rapidly in normoxic cells by the ubiquitin/proteasomal pathway. Under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is proline hydroxylated leading to a conformational change that promotes binding to the von Hippel Lindau protein (VHL) E3 ligase complex; ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation follows (3,4). Both hypoxic conditions and chemical hydroxylase inhibitors (such as desferrioxamine and cobalt) inhibit HIF-1α degradation and lead to its stabilization. In addition, HIF-1α can be induced in an oxygen-independent manner by various cytokines through the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway (5-7).HIF-1β is also known as AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) due to its ability to partner with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) to form a heterodimeric transcription factor complex (8). Together with AhR, HIF-1β plays an important role in xenobiotics metabolism (8). In addition, a chromosomal translocation leading to a TEL-ARNT fusion protein is associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (9). Studies also found that ARNT/HIF-1β expression levels decrease significantly in pancreatic islets from patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that HIF-1β plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell function (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is essential for the cellular response to hypoxia (1,2). Under normoxia conditions, the α subunit of HIF is ubiquitinated by von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein and is degraded in the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway (1,2). Hypoxia inhibits the degradation of the α subunit, which leads to its stabilization (1,2). HIF, in turn, regulates the transcription of a variety of genes that respond to hypoxia conditions (1,2). There are several isoforms of the HIF α subunit (2). Studies have found that HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression is increased in some human cancers (2). HIF-1α has both pro- and anti-proliferative activities, whereas HIF-2α does not possess anti-proliferative activity (2). Therefore, HIF-2α likely plays an important role in tumorigenesis (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
$695
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: ICOS (Inducible Co-Stimulator, CD278) is a member of the CD28 family that regulates T cell activity and immune responses (1). The ICOS protein contains an extracellular IgV like domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain with a YMFM motif (1-2). ICOS is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (1). Upon binding to its ligand, ICOS potentiates the T cell response to antigen through activation of the PI3K signaling pathway (2). In addition to enhancing T cell activation and proliferation, ICOS plays an important role in the regulation of T follicular helper cells (4). Research studies suggest that ICOS is a potential therapeutic target, and could serve as a prognostic biomarker for neoplastic therapy involving CTLA-4 blockade (5-7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acute phase response is induced by interleukin-6 (IL-6) produced by T cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial and other cells (1,2). IL-6 induces proliferation or differentiation in many cell types including B cells, thymocytes and T cells. IL-6, in concert with TGF-β, is important for developing Th17 responses. IL-6 binds to IL-6Rα and through this association induces gp130 homodimerization (1). gp130 homodimerization triggers the Jak/Stat cascade and the SHP-2/Erk MAP kinase cascade (1,3,4). IL-6 also forms a complex with an IL-6Rα splice variant that is nonmembrane-associated (3). The IL-6/soluble IL-6Rα complex can then activate the gp130 signaling pathway in cells that express gp130 but not IL-6Rα (3). Research studies have shown that IL-6, through increasing expression of proangiogenic VEGF, may also contribute to metastatic breast cancer (5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells and flow cytometry in human and mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Insulin (C27C9) Rabbit mAb #3014.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is widely expressed in many cell lines and cell types within fetal and postnatal tissues (1-3). Receptor autophosphorylation follows binding of the IGF-I and IGF-II ligands. Three tyrosine residues within the kinase domain (Tyr1131, Tyr1135, and Tyr1136) are the earliest major autophosphorylation sites (4). Phosphorylation of these three tyrosine residues is necessary for kinase activation (5,6). Insulin receptors (IRs) share significant structural and functional similarity with IGF-I receptors, including the presence of an equivalent tyrosine cluster (Tyr1146/1150/1151) within the kinase domain activation loop. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of IRs is one of the earliest cellular responses to insulin stimulation (7). Autophosphorylation begins with phosphorylation at Tyr1146 and either Tyr1150 or Tyr1151, while full kinase activation requires triple tyrosine phosphorylation (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) is a serine/threonine-specific kinase that can be coprecipitated in an IL-1-inducible manner with the IL-1 receptor (1). The mammalian family of IRAK molecules contains four members (IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4). The binding of IL-1 to IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) initiates the formation of a complex that includes IL-1RI, AcP, MyD88, and IRAKs (2). IRAK undergoes autophosphorylation shortly after IL-1 stimulation. The subsequent events involve IRAK dissociation from the IL-1RI complex, its ubiquitination, and its association with two membrane-bound proteins: TAB2 and TRAF6. The resulting IRAK-TRAF6-TAB2 complex is then released into the cytoplasm where it activates protein kinase cascades, including TAK1, IKKs, and the stress-activated kinases (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$303
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated K63-linkage Specific Polyubiquitin (D7A11) Rabbit mAb #5621.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The potassium/chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2, SLC12A5) is a neuron-specific transport protein responsible for regulating the cotransport of potassium and chloride ions. KCC2 uses the energy of the electrochemical potassium gradient to export chloride ions from cells, therefore maintaining intracellular chloride ion concentrations in mature neurons (1,2). The intracellular concentration of chloride ions determines the neuronal response to the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and glycine. As a result, KCC2 can play a critical role in regulating neuronal excitability in mature central nervous system neurons (3-5). Altered KCC2 expression and reduced KCC2 activity can result in an increase in intracellular chloride ion concentrations and subsequent hyperexcitability of neuronal systems. Cases of aberrant KCC2 function are associated with neurological disorders, such as multiple forms of epilepsy, neuropathic pain, and schizophrenia (6-10).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).