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Product listing: Neurogenin 2 (D2R3D) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9H2A3 #13144 to Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (587F11) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P31749 #4051

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Neurogenin 2 (Ngn2, NeuroG2) is a proneural, basic helix-loop-helix transcription (bHLH) factor and member of the neurogenin family that includes neurogenin 1 and neurogenin 3 (1). Neurogenin 2 is expressed in neuronal progenitor cells, is required for generation of glutamatergic neurons and is commonly used as a marker of neuronal differentiation (2,3). Neurogenin 2 upregulates a number of targets including the bHLH transcription factor NeuroD (4). Phosphorylation of Ngn2 at Tyr241 controls migration and dendritic morphology of cortical neurons (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) is a sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter. It is mainly expressed on the luminal membrane of renal epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TALH) and mediates the majority of NaCl resorption and concentration of urine (1,2). NKCC2 is the target for several diuretic drugs, such as bumetanide, and is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension (3,4). Mutations in the NKCC2-encoding gene, SLC12A1, causes Bartter’s syndrome, which is featured by impaired salt reabsorption in the TALH, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria (5,6). Recently, NKCC2 was reported to be expressed in the brain hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system (HNS) and upregulated upon osmotic stress (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) family of proteins is a diverse family of cytoplasmic innate immune receptors. They are characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal effector domain, which is often either a caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) or a pyrin domain (PYD), followed by a NACHT domain and carboxy-terminal leucine-rich-repeats (LRR) involved in recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) (1). NLR proteins play a variety of roles during the innate immune response including pathogen sensing, transcriptional activation of proinflammatory cytokines through NF-κB, transcriptional activation of type I interferons through IRFs, and formation of inflammasomes leading to activation of inflammatory caspases (1-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) family of proteins is a diverse family of cytoplasmic innate immune receptors. They are characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal effector domain, which is often either a caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) or a pyrin domain (PYD), followed by a NACHT domain and carboxy-terminal leucine-rich-repeats (LRR) involved in recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) (1). NLR proteins play a variety of roles during the innate immune response including pathogen sensing, transcriptional activation of proinflammatory cytokines through NF-κB, transcriptional activation of type I interferons through IRFs, and formation of inflammasomes leading to activation of inflammatory caspases (1-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nucleolin is a multi-functional protein that is one of the major components of the nucleoli (1). Nucleolin plays an essential role in various steps of ribosome biogenesis including rRNA synthesis, processing of pre-rRNA, pre-ribosomal RNA assembly, and transport of ribosomal proteins out of the nucleus (1-3). While the main function of nucleolin is ribosome biogenesis, it plays an important role in various other nuclear activities. Down regulation of nucleolin leads to increased expression of p53, defects in genome duplication, and a delay at prometaphase during mitosis leading to cell cycle arrest (4-6). In addition, nucleolin has been found in a complex with Rad51 and may participate in DNA repair by homologous recombination (7). Nucleolin binds to the catalytic subunit of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase, hTERT, and is thought to be involved in telomere maintenance (8). Nucleolin also possesses histone chaperone activity and is able to enhance the chromatin remodeling efficiency of SWItch/Sucrose Non Fermentable (SWI/SNF) and ATP-dependent chromatin-assembly factor (ACF), remove histone H2A-H2B dimers from nucleosomes, and facilitate the passage of RNA polymerase through chromatin (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Numb contains an amino-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain and carboxy-terminal endocytic binding motifs for α-adaptin and EH (Eps15 homology) domain-containing proteins, indicating a role in endocytosis (1,2). There are four mammalian Numb splicing isoforms that are differentially expressed and may have distinct functions (3-5). Numb acts as a negative regulator of Notch signaling by promoting ubiquitination and degradation of Notch (6). The protein is asymmetrically segregated into one daughter cell during cell division, producing two daughter cells with different responses to Notch signaling and different cell fates (7,8). The localization of Numb can also be regulated by G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and PKC signaling (9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Olfactomedin-4 (OLFM4, hGC-1) is a member of the Olfactomedin family, a small group of extracellular proteins defined by the presence of a conserved "Olfactomedin domain" that is thought to facilitate protein-protein interactions (1). OLFM4 is a secreted glycoprotein, which forms disulfide bond-mediated oligomers, and is thought to mediate cell adhesion through its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins such as lectins (2). Human OLFM4 was first cloned from myeloid cells (3) and is expressed in a distinct subset of neutrophils, though the functional significance of this differential expression pattern remains unclear (4). Among normal tissues, the expression of OLFM4 protein is most abundant in intestinal crypts (5), where it has garnered attention as a possible marker of intestinal stem cells (6). Notably, OLFM4 expression is markedly increased in several tumor types, including colorectal, gastric, pancreas, lung, and breast (reviewed in [1]). Furthermore, research studies show that the expression levels of OLFM4 vary in relation to the severity and/or differentiation status of multiple tumor types (1, 6-8), leading to the suggestion that OLFM4 may have utility as a prognostic marker in some cancer patients (9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that regulates T cell activity and immune responses. The OX40 protein contains four cysteine rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a QEE motif (1,2). OX40 is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while the OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, CD252) is predominantly expressed on activated antigen presenting cells (3-7). The engagement of OX40 with OX40L leads to the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and results in the formation of a TCR-independent signaling complex. One component of this complex, PKCθ, activates the NF-κB pathway (2,8). OX40 signaling through Akt can also enhance TCR signaling directly (9). Research studies indicate that the OX40L-OX40 pathway is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases (10). Additional research studies show that OX40 agonists augment anti-tumor immunity in several cancer types (11,12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The tumor suppressor protein p21 Waf1/Cip1 acts as an inhibitor of cell cycle progression. It functions in stoichiometric relationships forming heterotrimeric complexes with cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. In association with CDK2 complexes, it serves to inhibit kinase activity and block progression through G1/S (1). However, p21 may also enhance assembly and activity in complexes of CDK4 or CDK6 and cyclin D (2). The carboxy-terminal region of p21 is sufficient to bind and inhibit PCNA, a subunit of DNA polymerase, and may coordinate DNA replication with cell cycle progression (3). Upon UV damage or during cell cycle stages when cdc2/cyclin B or CDK2/cyclin A are active, p53 is phosphorylated and upregulates p21 transcription via a p53-responsive element (4). Protein levels of p21 are downregulated through ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons, regulating the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, but high levels of kinase activity are detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no discrete substrates have been attributed as a function of p35 vs. p39. Amongst many, substrates of CDK5 include p35 and p39. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, and this is likely a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). NGF activates Erk and EGR1, and induces p35 expression in PC12 cells (3). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Accumulation of p25 is found in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (4-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PACT (protein activator of protein kinase R) is a double stranded RNA binding protein and a cellular activator of PKR (protein kinase R), a kinase that mediates the antiviral and antiproliferative actions of interferon (1). Stress signals such as serum starvation and arsenite treatment induces PACT to heterodimerize with PKR, resulting in the phosphorylation of eIF-2α and inhibition of protein synthesis (1,2). PACT has also been shown to play a role in RNA-mediated gene silencing by stimulating the activity of Dicer, thereby affecting the efficiency of miRNA accumulation and siRNA gene silencing (3,4). More recently, PACT has been shown to interact with RIG-I, a sensor of viral nucleic acids, and stimulates RIG-I-induced type I interferon production (5). Researchers have found that mutations in PACT are associated with dystonia, a movement disorder where patients develop involuntary muscle contractions and postures (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$111
20 µl
$261
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a member of the DNA sliding clamp family of proteins that assist in DNA replication (1). Crystal structure data suggests that a PCNA homotrimer ring can encircle and slide along the DNA double helix (2). Multiple proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle control bind to PCNA rather than directly associating with DNA, thus facilitating fast processing of DNA (reviewed in 3). PCNA protein expression is a well-accepted marker of proliferation.

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse cells and tissues. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PD-1 (D7D5W) XP® Rabbit mAb (Mouse Specific) #84651.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The programmed cell death 1 protein (PD-1, PDCD1, CD279) is a member of the CD28 family of immunoreceptors that regulate T cell activation and immune responses (1-3). The PD-1 protein contains an extracellular Ig V domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail that includes an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM). PD-1 is activated by the cell surface ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 (4). Upon activation, PD-1 ITIM and ITSM phosphorylation leads to the recruitment of the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2, which suppress TCR signaling (5-7). In addition to activated T-cells, PD-1 is expressed in activated B-cells and monocytes, although its function in these cell types has not been fully characterized (8). The PD-1 pathway plays an important role in immune tolerance (3); however, research studies show that cancer cells often adopt this pathway to escape immune surveillance (9). Consequently, blockade of PD-1 and its ligands is proving to be a sound strategy for neoplastic intervention (10).

$426
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: The programmed cell death 1 protein (PD-1, PDCD1, CD279) is a member of the CD28 family of immunoreceptors that regulate T cell activation and immune responses (1-3). The PD-1 protein contains an extracellular Ig V domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail that includes an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM). PD-1 is activated by the cell surface ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 (4). Upon activation, PD-1 ITIM and ITSM phosphorylation leads to the recruitment of the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2, which suppress TCR signaling (5-7). In addition to activated T-cells, PD-1 is expressed in activated B-cells and monocytes, although its function in these cell types has not been fully characterized (8). The PD-1 pathway plays an important role in immune tolerance (3); however, research studies show that cancer cells often adopt this pathway to escape immune surveillance (9). Consequently, blockade of PD-1 and its ligands is proving to be a sound strategy for neoplastic intervention (10).

$145
20 µl
$426
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$115
20 µl
$281
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$145
20 µl
$426
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PD-L1 (D8T4X) Rabbit mAb #86744.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$145
20 µl
$426
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$145
20 µl
$426
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (PD-L2, B7-DC, CD273) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T-cell activation and immune responses (1,2). PD-L2 binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T-cell activation. PD-L2 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by activated dendritic cells, macrophages, and T-cells (1,3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L2 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC2 domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L2 is expressed in several tumor types, including lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (4-7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Triacylglycerol is stored in lipid droplets as a primary energy reserve. Perilipin is localized at the periphery of lipid droplets and serves as a protective coating against lipases (1-3). Evidence suggests that PKA regulates lipolysis by phosphorylating perilipin (1,2,4,5). Phosphorylation of perilipin results in the conformational change that exposes lipid droplets to endogenous lipases, such as hormone-sensitive lipases (2). Hence, perilipin plays a pivotal role in lipid storage (2,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an eIF2α kinase and transmembrane protein resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane that couples ER stress signals to translation inhibition (1-3). ER stress increases the activity of PERK, which then phosphorylates eIF2α to promote reduced translation. Research studies have demonstrated that PERK-deficient mice have defects in pancreatic β cells several weeks after birth, suggesting a role for PERK-mediated translational control in protecting secretory cells from ER stress (4). PERK activation during ER stress correlates with autophosphorylation of its cytoplasmic kinase domain (1-3). Phosphorylation of PERK at Thr980 serves as a marker for its activation status.

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).