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Product listing: Prestained Protein Marker, Broad Range (11-190 kDa) #13953 to Bassoon (D63B6) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9UPA5 #6897

$42
50 µl
$85
350 µl
$347
1750 µl
Prestained Protein Marker, Broad Range (11-190 kDa) is a mixture of purified proteins covalently coupled to a blue dye that resolve to a series of 11 bands between 11 and 190 kDa following electrophoresis. The protein concentrations are carefully balanced for even intensity. The covalent coupling of the dye to the proteins affects their electrophoretic behavior in SDS-PAGE gels relative to unstained proteins.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

The Acetyl-Histone Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating the acetylation states of histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

The AMPK and ACC Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate energy homeostasis and fatty acid synthesis within the cell. The kit contains primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots with each antibody.
The Phospho-Erk1/2 Pathway Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating multiple members of the Erk pathway as well as their activation state. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

The StemLight™ iPS cell Reprogramming Antibody Kit contains a panel of antibodies for the detection of various proteins, combinations of which have been used to reprogram somatic cells to Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells. The kit can be used to track efficiency of expression of the reprogramming factors following transfection, viral transduction and other means of protein delivery. The kit components are pre-optimized for parallel use in immunofluorescent analysis at a standard dilution, but components are also validated for use in other applications --please refer to individual data sheet information for application specific recommendations. Enough reagents are provided for 160 immunofluorescent assays based on a working volume of 100 μl.

Background: Pluripotency is the ability of a cell to differentiate into cell types of the three germ layers, the endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm. It is a property shared by embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma and induced pluripotent cells.Oct-4, Sox2 and Nanog are key transcriptional regulators that are highly expressed in pluripotent cells (1). Together they form a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Over-expression of Oct-4 and Sox2 along with Klf4 and c- Myc can induce pluripotency in both mouse and human somatic cells, highlighting their roles as key regulators of the transcrip- tional network necessary for renewal and pluripotency (4-5). It has also been demonstrated that overexpression of Oct-4, Sox2, Nanog and Lin28 can induce pluripotency in human somatic cells (6). Upon differentiation of pluripotent cultures, expression of Oct-4, Nanog and Sox2 is downregulated.SSEA4, TRA-1-81 and TRA-1-60 antibodies recognize antigens expressed on the cell surface of all pluripotent cells. SSEA4 recognizes a glycolipid carbohydrate epitope (7). TRA-1-60(S) and TRA-1-81 antibodies recognize different proteoglycan epitopes on variants of the same protein, podocalyxin (8). These epitopes are neuraminadase sensitive and resistant, respectively. Reactivity of SSEA4, TRA-1-81 and TRA-1-60 antibodies with their respective cell surface markers are lost upon differentiation of pluripotent cells, corresponding with a loss of pluripotent potential (9).

The Apoptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the levels of inactive and active caspases. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments with each antibody.

Background: Apoptosis is a regulated physiological process leading to cell death. Caspases, a family of cysteine acid proteases, are central regulators of apoptosis. Initiator caspases (including 8, 9, 10 and 12) are closely coupled to proapoptotic signals. Once activated, these caspases cleave and activate downstream effector caspases (including 3, 6 and 7), which in turn cleave cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins like PARP, α-fodrin, DFF and lamin A, and induce apoptosis. Cytochrome c released from mitochondria is coupled to the activation of caspase-9, a key initiator caspase (1). Proapoptotic stimuli include the FasL, TNF-α, DNA damage and ER stress. Fas and TNFR activate caspases 8 and 10 (2), DNA damage leads to the activation of caspase-9 and ER stress leads to the calcium-mediated activation of caspase-12 (3). The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family includes XIAP and survivin and functions by binding and inhibiting several caspases (4,5). Smac/Diablo, a mitochondrial protein, is released into the cytosol upon mitochondrial stress and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs. The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effects of the IAPs on caspases (6).

The Apoptosis/Necroptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting markers for apoptosis and necroptosis. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Apoptosis is a regulated physiological process leading to cell death (1,2). Caspases, a family of cysteine acid proteases, are central regulators of apoptosis. Caspases are synthesized as inactive zymogens containing a pro-domain followed by large (p20) and small subunits (p10) that are proteolytically processed in a cascade of caspase activity. Initiator caspases (including 8, 9, 10, and 12) are closely coupled to proapoptotic signals. Once activated, these caspases cleave and activate downstream effector caspases (including 3, 6, and 7), which in turn cleave cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins like PARP, α-fodrin, DFF, and lamin A, and induce apoptosis. Cytochrome c released from mitochondria is coupled to the activation of caspase-9, a key initiator caspase. Apoptosis induced through the extrinsic mechanisms involving death receptors in the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily activates caspase-8. Activated caspase-8 cleaves and activates downstream effector caspases, such as caspase-1, -3, -6, and -7. Caspase-3 is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP).Necroptosis, a regulated pathway for necrotic cell death, is triggered by a number of inflammatory signals, including cytokines in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, pathogen sensors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and ischemic injury (3,4). Necroptosis is negatively regulated by caspase-8 mediated apoptosis in which the kinase RIP/RIPK1 is cleaved (5). Furthermore, necroptosis is inhibited by a small molecule inhibitor of RIP, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) (6). Research studies show that necroptosis contributes to a number of pathological conditions, and Nec-1 has been shown to provide neuroprotection in models such as ischemic brain injury (7). RIP is phosphorylated at several sites within the kinase domain that are sensitive to Nec-1, including Ser14, Ser15, Ser161, and Ser166 (8). Phosphorylation drives association with RIP3, which is required for necroptosis (9-11). Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a pseudokinase that was identified as downstream target of RIP3 in the necroptosis pathway (12). During necroptosis RIP3 is phosphorylated at Ser227, which recruits MLKL and leads to its phosphorylation at Thr357 and Ser358 (12). Knockdown of MLKL through multiple mechanisms results in inhibition of necroptosis (13). While the precise mechanism for MLKL-induced necroptosis is unclear, some studies have shown that necroptosis leads to oligomerization of MLKL and translocation to the plasma membrane, where it effects membrane integrity (14-17).

Cell Cycle Regulation Antibody Sampler kit offers an economical way of detecting eight integral cell cycle regulation proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is dependent, in part, on the tightly regulated activity of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclin D/CDK4/6 activity occurs in mid-late G1 phase, upstream of CDK2/cyclin E activity. Both of these activities are required for hyperphosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb). pRb phosphorylation allows the release of S phase-promoting transcription factors and is indicative of the cell's commitment to proliferate. This point in the cell cycle is known as the restriction point. Cyclin protein levels oscillate throughout the cell cycle, and their availability is a means of controlling CDK activity and cell proliferation. Cyclin D is degraded through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the absence of mitogenic signaling. Ubiquitination of cyclin D1 is enhanced by phosphorylation at Thr286 by glycogen synthase kinase 3b (GSK-3b) (1). p27/Kip1, p57 Kip2 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 are members of the Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. They form heterotrimeric complexes with cyclins and CDKs, inhibiting kinase activity and blocking progression through G1/S phase (2). However, p21 may enhance assembly and activity of cyclin D/CDK4/6 complexes (3). Levels of p21 and p27 protein are controlled through ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (4). Levels of p27 are upregulated in quiescent cells and in cells treated with negative cell cycle regulators. p27 nuclear localization is controlled by Akt-dependent phosphorylation at Thr157 (5). The inhibitors of CDK4 (INK4) family include p15 INK4B, p16 INK4A, p18 INK4C, and p19 INK4D. All INK4 proteins selectively inhibit CDK4/6 activity, either in a binary complex, or in a ternary complex including cyclin D, resulting in inhibition of cell division (6,7).

The Cyclin Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating the presence of cyclin proteins in cells. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each antibody.
This kit provides an economical means to analyze major signaling checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The kit contains primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots with each antibody.
The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating EMT. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNFRSF9 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (1, 2). It is also called 4-1BB or CD137 (1, 2). 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 is expressed in activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells and dendritic cells (2-5). The ligand 4-1BBL/CD137L/TNFSF9 on antigen presenting cells binds to 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 and costimulates the activation of T cells (5). The binding of agonistic antibodies to 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 also leads to costimulation for T cell activation (5). Studies have shown the effectiveness of targeting 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 by its agonistic antibodies in cancer immunotherapy (6).

$297
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: DNA Dot Blot, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and mammalian development (1,2). 5-methylcytosine is a repressive epigenetic mark established de novo by two enzymes, DNMT3a and DNMT3b, and is maintained by DNMT1 (3, 4). 5-methylcytosine was originally thought to be passively depleted during DNA replication. However, subsequent studies have shown that Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) proteins TET1, TET2, and TET3 can catalyze the oxidation of methylated cytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (5). Additionally, TET proteins can further oxidize 5-hmC to form 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC), both of which are excised by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG), effectively linking cytosine oxidation to the base excision repair pathway and supporting active cytosine demethylation (6,7).

$115
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: DNA Dot Blot, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Methylated DNA IP

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and mammalian development (1,2). 5-methylcytosine is a repressive epigenetic mark established de novo by two enzymes, DNMT3a and DNMT3b, and is maintained by DNMT1 (3, 4). 5-methylcytosine was originally thought to be passively depleted during DNA replication. However, subsequent studies have shown that Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) proteins TET1, TET2, and TET3 can catalyze the oxidation of methylated cytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (5). Additionally, TET proteins can further oxidize 5-hmC to form 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC), both of which are excised by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG), effectively linking cytosine oxidation to the base excision repair pathway and supporting active cytosine demethylation (6,7).

$107
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: DNA Dot Blot, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Methylated DNA IP

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and mammalian development (1,2). 5-methylcytosine is a repressive epigenetic mark established de novo by two enzymes, DNMT3a and DNMT3b, and is maintained by DNMT1 (3, 4). 5-methylcytosine was originally thought to be passively depleted during DNA replication. However, subsequent studies have shown that Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) proteins TET1, TET2, and TET3 can catalyze the oxidation of methylated cytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (5). Additionally, TET proteins can further oxidize 5-hmC to form 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC), both of which are excised by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG), effectively linking cytosine oxidation to the base excision repair pathway and supporting active cytosine demethylation (6,7).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

$248
400 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Post-transcriptional processing of RNAs such as RNA editing is an important mechanism by which diversity in RNA and protein is achieved that is not otherwise encoded by the genome (1,2). The most common form of RNA editing is the conversion of adenosine (A) into inosine (I) on double stranded RNA by the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins (1-3). Since inosine base pairs with cytidine, it is interpreted as a guanosine by the splicing and translational machinery leading to alteration in the protein sequence, as well as splicing isoforms being generated (1,4-6). A-to-I editing can also influence RNA sequence recognition by RNA binding proteins and non-coding RNA, such as miRNAs, affecting subsequent RNA processing, stability, and protein expression levels (2).ADAR1 is ubiquitously expressed with two known isoforms ADAR1L (p150) and ADAR1S (p110) resulting from transcription using alternative promoters and start codons. ADAR1S is constitutively expressed in the nucleus, while ADAR1L is interferon-inducible and present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The induction of ADAR1L in response to cellular stress and viral infection suggests a role for RNA editing in the innate immune response (1,7). In addition, ADAR1 is essential in mammalian development, particularly in hematopoiesis and suppression of interferon signaling to protect hematopoietic stem cells from destruction in the fetal liver and the adult bone marrow (8,9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Alix, a phylogenetically conserved cytosolic scaffold protein, contains an N-terminal Bro1 domain, a coiled-coil region and a C-terminal proline-rich domain (1,2). Originally identified as an ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein involved in programmed cell death (3,4), Alix also regulates many other cellular processes, such as endocytic membrane trafficking and cell adhesion through interactions with ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins, endophilins, and CIN85 (Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Alix, a phylogenetically conserved cytosolic scaffold protein, contains an N-terminal Bro1 domain, a coiled-coil region and a C-terminal proline-rich domain (1,2). Originally identified as an ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein involved in programmed cell death (3,4), Alix also regulates many other cellular processes, such as endocytic membrane trafficking and cell adhesion through interactions with ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins, endophilins, and CIN85 (Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa) (5,6).

$185
20 µl
$539
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor for pleiotrophin (PTN), a growth factor involved in embryonic brain development (1-3). In ALK-expressing cells, PTN induces phosphorylation of both ALK and the downstream effectors IRS-1, Shc, PLCγ, and PI3 kinase (1). ALK was originally discovered as a nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion protein produced by a translocation (4). Investigators have found that the NPM-ALK fusion protein is a constitutively active, oncogenic tyrosine kinase associated with anaplastic lymphoma (4). Research literature suggests that activation of PLCγ by NPM-ALK may be a crucial step for its mitogenic activity and involved in the pathogenesis of anaplastic lymphomas (5).A distinct ALK oncogenic fusion protein involving ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4 (EML4) has been described in the research literature from a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, with corresponding fusion transcripts present in some cases of lung adenocarcinoma. The short, amino-terminal region of the microtubule-associated protein EML4 is fused to the kinase domain of ALK (6-8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TMS1 (target of methylation-induced silencing)/ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), also referred to as PYCARD and CARD5, is a 22-kDa pro-apoptotic protein containing an N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (CARD) (1-2). The ASC/TMS1 gene was originally found to be aberrantly methylated and silenced in breast cancer cells (2), and has since been found to be silenced in a number of other cancers, including ovarian cancer (3), glioblastoma (4), melanoma (5), gastric cancer (6), lung cancer (7), and prostate cancer (8). Expression of ASC/TMS1 can be induced by pro-apoptotic/inflammatory stimuli (9). During apoptosis ASC/TMS1 is re-distributed from the cytosol to the mitochondria and associates with mitochondrial Bax to trigger cytochrome c release and subsequent apoptosis (10). ASC/TMS1 has also been found to be a critical component of inflammatory signaling where it associates with and activates caspase-1 in response to pro-inflammatory signals (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activating Transcription Factor-6 (ATF-6) is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Upon accumulation of improperly folded proteins in the ER, ATF-6 is cleaved liberating a 50 kDa amino-terminal fragment that translocates to the nucleus (1, 2). There, ATF-6 activates transcription of ER chaperones and components of ER-associated degradation such as GRP78, XBP-1, and CHOP (3-5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors are a family of broad-spectrum growth factors influencing a plethora of cellular activities. The interaction of at least 23 ligands, 4 receptors and multiple coreceptors provides a dramatic complexity to a signaling system capable of effecting a multitude of responses (1,2). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF2), initially identified as a mitogen with prominent angiogenic properties, is now recognized as a multifunctional growth factor (3). It is clear that bFGF produces its biological effects in target cells by signaling through cell-surface FGF receptors. bFGF binds to all four FGF receptors. Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, allowing binding and activation of cytoplasmic downstream target proteins, including FRS-2, PLC and Crk (4,5). The FGF signaling pathway appears to play a significant role not only in normal cell growth regulation but also in tumor development and progression (6).Acidic FGF (aFGF or FGF1) is another extensively investigated protein of the FGF family. aFGF shares 55% DNA sequence homology with bFGF. These two growth factors are ubiquitously expressed and exhibit a wide spectrum of similiar biological activities with quantitative differences likely due to variation in receptor affinity or binding (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Bassoon (BSN), named such to underline its presumptive role in orchestrating events of the synaptic vesicle cycle (1), is a very large coiled-coil protein and is one of the core components of the cytomatrix at the active zones of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses (2). BSN is a scaffold protein that is a component of the synaptic ribbon, an electron-dense structure anchored at the active zone that tethers synaptic vesicles. Genetic disruption of BSN displaces the anchoring of ribbons to the active zones of photoreceptors and cochlear inner hair cells (3), and this displacement of the ribbons substantially impairs synaptic transmission, suggesting that, when present, BSN is important for the vesicle cycle (4).