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Product listing: Ki-67 (8D5) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P46013 #9449 to Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 594 Conjugate), UniProt ID P07196 #8743

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ki-67 (D3B5) Rabbit mAb #9129.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human and rat cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ki-67 (D3B5) Rabbit mAb #9129.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ki-67 (D3B5) Rabbit mAb #9129.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 and 2 (LAMP1 and LAMP2) are two abundant lysosomal membrane proteins (1,2). Both are transmembrane proteins and are heavily glycosylated at the amino-terminal luminal side of the lysosomal inner leaflet, which protects the proteins from proteolysis (3). The carboxy terminus of LAMP1 is exposed to the cytoplasm and contains a tyrosine sorting motif that targets LAMP to lysosomal membranes (4). LAMP1 and LAMP2 are 37% homologous in their protein sequences. Both LAMP1 and LAMP2 are involved in regulating lysosomal motility during lysosome-phagosome fusion and cholesterol trafficking (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical component in the regulation of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids (3,4). The four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, have been shown to interact with raptor in mTORC1 (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2). A protein complex consisting of LAMTOR1/C11orf59, LAMTOR2/ROBLD3, and LAMTOR3/MAPKSP1 has been identified to interact with and recruit the four Rag GTPases to the surface of lysosomes (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but it has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegenerative diseases, infection, and cancer (3). Autophagy marker Light Chain 3 (LC3) was originally identified as a subunit of microtubule-associated proteins 1A and 1B (termed MAP1LC3) (4) and subsequently found to contain similarity to the yeast protein Apg8/Aut7/Cvt5 critical for autophagy (5). Three human LC3 isoforms (LC3A, LC3B, and LC3C) undergo post-translational modifications during autophagy (6-9). Cleavage of LC3 at the carboxy terminus immediately following synthesis yields the cytosolic LC3-I form. During autophagy, LC3-I is converted to LC3-II through lipidation by a ubiquitin-like system involving Atg7 and Atg3 that allows for LC3 to become associated with autophagic vesicles (6-10). The presence of LC3 in autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3 to the lower migrating form, LC3-II, have been used as indicators of autophagy (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, CSF-1) receptor is an integral membrane tyrosine kinase encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. M-CSF receptor is expressed in monocytes (macrophages and their progenitors) and drives growth and development of this blood cell lineage. (1-3). Binding of M-CSF to its receptor induces receptor dimerization, activation, and autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosine residues used as docking sites for SH2-containing signaling proteins (4). There are at least five major tyrosine autophosphorylation sites. Tyr723 (Tyr721 in mouse) is located in the kinase insert (KI) region. Phosphorylated Tyr723 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase as well as PLCγ2 (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr809 provides a docking site for Shc (5). Overactivation of this receptor can lead to a malignant phenotype in various cell systems (6). The activated M-CSF receptor has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (7) and breast cancer (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lysine is subject to a wide array of regulatory post-translational modifications due to its positively charged ε-amino group side chain. The most prevalent of these are ubiquitination and acetylation, which are highly conserved among prokaryotes and eukaryotes (1,2). Acyl group transfer from the metabolic intermediates acetyl-, succinyl-, malonyl-, glutaryl-, butyryl-, propionyl-, and crotonyl-CoA all neutralize lysine’s positive charge and confer structural alterations affecting substrate protein function. Lysine acetylation is catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases, HATs, using acetyl-CoA as a cofactor (3,4). Deacylation is mediated by histone deacetylases, HDACs 1-11, and NAD-dependent Sirtuins 1-7. Some sirtuins have little to no deacetylase activity, suggesting that they are better suited for other acyl lysine substrates (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is a neuronal phosphoprotein that regulates the structure and stability of microtubules, neuronal morphogenesis, cytoskeleton dynamics, and organelle trafficking in axons and dendrites (1). Multiple MAP2 isoforms are expressed in neurons, including high molecular weight MAP2A and MAP2B (280 and 270 kDa), and low molecular weight MAP2C and MAP2D (70 and 75 kDa). Phosphorylation of MAP2 modulates its association with the cytoskeleton and is developmentally regulated. GSK-3 and p44/42 MAP kinase phosphorylate MAP2 at Ser136, Thr1620, and Thr1623 (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr1620/1623 by GSK-3 inhibits MAP2 association with microtubules and microtubule stability (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1, SLC47A1) is a proton-coupled, organic cation antiporter located at the apical membrane of proximal kidney epithelial cells and the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes (1). MATE1 mediates the secretion of organic cations including drugs, toxins, and endogenous metabolites, into bile and urine (2,3). Substrates of MATE1 include multiple therapeutic agents, including metformin, cisplatin, acyclovir, and cephalexin (4,5). Polymorphisms in the corresponding SLC47A1 gene may affect the rate of renal clearance of certain cationic drugs, limiting the therapeutic benefits of these agents (6). Specifically, research studies demonstrate that SLC47A1 allelic variation correlates with differences in renal clearance rates of metformin (7), which may have an effect on the therapeutic impact of this drug in individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), also known as CCL2, monocyte chemotactic activating factor (MCAF) or glioma-derived chemotactic factor-2 (GDCF-2), is the product of the human JE gene and a member of the family of C-C (or β) chemokines (1-4). The predicted molecular weight of MCP-1 protein is 11-13 kDa, but it may migrate at 20-30 kDa due to glycosylation. MCP-1 is secreted by a variety of cell types in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli and was originally described for its chemotactic activity on monocytes. This activity has led to studies demonstrating its role in diseases characterized by monocyte infiltrates such as psoriasis (5), rheumatoid arthritis (6) and atherosclerosis (7). MCP-1 may also contribute to tumor progression and angiogenesis (8). Signaling by MCP-1 is mediated by the G-protein coupled receptor CCR2 (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MDM2, a ubiquitin ligase for p53, plays a central role in regulation of the stability of p53 (1). Akt-mediated phosphorylation of MDM2 at Ser166 and Ser186 increases its interaction with p300, allowing MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53 (2-4). Phosphorylation of MDM2 also blocks its binding to p19ARF, increasing the degradation of p53 (3).

$348
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. Mer (D21F11) XP® Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for the immunoprecipitation of Mer. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Mer (D21F11) XP® Rabbit mAb #4319.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Mer tyrosine kinase belongs to a receptor tyrosine kinase family with Axl and Tyro3. This family is characterized by a common NCAM (neural adhesion molecule)-related extracellular domain and a common ligand, GAS6 (growth arrest-specific protein 6). Mer protein has an apparent molecular weight of 170-210 kDa due to different glycosylation patterns generated in different cell types. Mer can be activated by dimerization and autophosphorylation through ligand binding or homophilic cell-cell interaction mediated by its NCAM-like motif (1). The downstream signaling components of activated Mer include PI3 kinase, PLCγ, and MAP kinase (2). Family members are prone to transcriptional regulation and carry out diverse functions including the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, and survival (3). Mer regulates macrophage activation, promotes apoptotic cell engulfment, and supports platelet aggregation and clot stability in vivo (4). Investigators have found that overexpression of Mer may play a cooperative role in leukemogenesis and may be an effective target for biologically based leukemia/lymphoma therapy (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The MSLN gene encodes a 69 kDa precursor protein that is proteolytically cleaved to yield Megakaryocyte Potentiating Factor (MPF) and a GPI-anchored membrane protein termed mesothelin (1). Expression of (cleaved) mesothelin is largely confined to mesothelial cells of normal pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum, but has been reported to be overexpressed in some cancers, including mesothelioma, and some pancreatic and ovarian adenocarcinomas (1,2). Although suggested to be involved in cell adhesion, the physiological functions of mesothelin have not been determined. It is known, however, that mesothelin can be shed from the cell surface following cleavage by TNF-α converting enzyme. Research studies show that serum levels of mesothelin are markedly increased in patients with mesothelioma and ovarian cancer (1), suggesting that serum mesothelin levels may have utility as a cancer biomarker (1-3).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The MSLN gene encodes a 69 kDa precursor protein that is proteolytically cleaved to yield Megakaryocyte Potentiating Factor (MPF) and a GPI-anchored membrane protein termed mesothelin (1). Expression of (cleaved) mesothelin is largely confined to mesothelial cells of normal pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum, but has been reported to be overexpressed in some cancers, including mesothelioma, and some pancreatic and ovarian adenocarcinomas (1,2). Although suggested to be involved in cell adhesion, the physiological functions of mesothelin have not been determined. It is known, however, that mesothelin can be shed from the cell surface following cleavage by TNF-α converting enzyme. Research studies show that serum levels of mesothelin are markedly increased in patients with mesothelioma and ovarian cancer (1), suggesting that serum mesothelin levels may have utility as a cancer biomarker (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Necroptosis, a regulated pathway for necrotic cell death, is triggered by a number of inflammatory signals including cytokines in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, pathogen sensors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and ischemic injury (1,2). The process is negatively regulated by caspases and is initiated through a complex containing the RIP1 and RIP3 kinases, typically referred to as the necrosome. Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a pseudokinase that was identified as downstream target of RIP3 in the necroptosis pathway (3,4). During necroptosis RIP3 is phosphorylated at Ser227, which recruits MLKL and leads to its phosphorylation at Thr357 and Ser358 (3). Knockdown of MLKL through multiple mechanisms results in inhibition of necroptosis (3-5). While the precise mechanism for MLKL-induced necroptosis is unclear, some studies have shown that necroptosis leads to oligomerization of MLKL and translocation to the plasma membrane, where it effects membrane integrity (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteases that target many extracellular proteins including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9 have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (2-4). Research studies have shown that MMP activity correlates with cancer development (2). One mechanism of MMP regulation is transcriptional (5). Once synthesized, MMP exists as a latent proenzyme. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full length protein (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated mTOR (7C10) Rabbit mAb #2983.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MX1 (Myxovirus resistance protein 1/MxA) is an interferon-inducible antiviral protein that confers resistance to RNA viruses (1-4). MX1 has GTPase activity, and GTP-bound MX1 adopts a conformation that enables interaction with viral nucleocapsids (5-7). This interaction blocks transport of viral nucleocapsids to the nucleus, which prevents transcription of the viral genome (7,8). Structural studies suggest that the antiviral activity of MX1 involves the formation of MX1 oligomeric rings around viral nucleocapsids (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an abundant central nervous system (CNS) myelin membrane protein that plays an important role in nerve myelination. Myelin sheaths are multi-layered membranes derived from oligodendrocytes that increase the conduction velocity of axonal impulses. MBP helps to adhere the cytoplasmic leaflets of adjacent oligodendrocyte membranes to one another. Several splice variants of MBP are expressed in cells and the protein is modified following translation (i.e. phosphorylation, methylation), which suggests additional membrane adhesion functions (1).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidase enzyme that is part of the host defense system of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (reviewed in 1). The gene for MPO was cloned independently from several laboratories (2-5). A decrease in MPO expression was noticed upon differentiation of HL-60 cells (5). MPO catalyzes the reaction of hydrogen peroxide and chloride (or other halides) to produce hypochlorous acid and other potent antimicrobial oxidants. Knockout mice of MPO are impaired in clearing select microbial infections (6). Processing of mature MPO from an initial 80-90 kDa translation product involves insertion of a heme moiety, glycosylation, and proteolytic cleavage. The mature protein is a tetramer of two heavy chains (60 kDa) and two light chains (12 kDa). It is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and monocytes and secreted during their activation. Heightened MPO levels have been associated with tissue damage and a number of pathological conditions (1).

$260
200 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule, CD56) is an adhesion glycoprotein with five extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III repeats. Structural diversity is introduced by alternative splicing resulting in different cytoplasmic domains (1). NCAM mediates neuronal attachment, neurite extension and cell-cell interactions through homo and heterophilic interactions. PSA (polysialic acid) post-translationally modifies NCAM and increases the metastatic potential of small cell lung carcinoma, Wilms+ tumor, neuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma (2). CD56 and CD16 are commonly used to identify NK cells although some cells with the T cell markers CD3 and CD4 also express CD56 (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Nectin-2, also known as CD112 and poliovirus receptor-related 2 (PVRL2), is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein ubiquitously expressed on various human tissues (1). It is a calcium independent cell adhesion molecule known to interact with several cell surface receptors, including DNAM-1 (CD226), LFA-1 (CD11a), Nectin-3 (CD113), TIGIT (VSTM3), and PVRIG (CD112R) (2-7). It is one of the major constituents of adherins junctions, and therefore plays a central role in a number of cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, and proliferation (2-8). Within the immune system, Nectin-2 modulates immune cell signaling. Upon interaction with DNAM-1 expressed on T and NK cells, Nectin-2 stimulates proliferation and cytokine production (4). Upon interaction with PVRIG, Nectin-2 inhibits proliferation (7). Thus, Nectin-2 can be either a co-stimulator or a co-inhibitor of immune cell function depending on competitive receptor interactions. Nectin-2 also serves as an entry for certain mutant strains of herpes simplex virus and pseudorabies virus, and it is involved in cell to cell spreading of these viruses (8,9). Alternate transcriptional splice variants, encoding different isoforms, have been characterized (10,11).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat brain. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb #2837.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).