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Product listing: ADAM9 (D64B5) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q13443 #4151 to βIG-H3 Antibody, UniProt ID Q15582 #2719

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ADAM (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influences cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins such as cytokines and growth factors, by influencing cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), and by directly remodeling the ECM. Conserved domains in ADAM family members include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The prodomain is thought to aid in protein folding. Disintegrin and cysteine-rich domains mediate adhesion, at least in part, through binding to integrins. Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail as well as its interaction with other signaling proteins may influence intra- and extracellular signaling (1). ADAM9 is widely distributed and has been shown to affect migration in skin keratinocytes (3,4). Research studies have shown that ADAM9 is overexpressed in prostate cancer (5), pancreatic cancer (6), gastric cancer (7), and has been linked to invasion and metastasis in small cell lung cancer (8). Research has also shown that an alternatively spliced short (50 kDa) form of ADAM9 containing protease activity is involved in tumor cell invasion (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: BST2 (CD317, Tetherin, HM1.24) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein functioning as a major mediator of the innate immune defense against the dissemination of enveloped viruses by tethering viron on cell surface (1). BST2 has a N-terminal cytoplasmic tail for entocytosis and cytoskelatal signaling, a transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain containing putative disulfide bonds and coiled coil region for forming homodimer, and a C-terminal GPI domain for membran anchoring (2,3). Both the transmembrane domain and the GPI domain can insert either to the cell membrane or the viral envelope membrane and hold them together to prevent viral release. Virus counteracts BST2 by encoding viral protein as antagonist. These viral proteins interact directly with BST2 to either enhance BST2 endocytosis/lysosomal degradation (such as Vpu) or prevent BST2 secretion pathway by sequestering the protein in endosome (2, 3). BST2 is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers, breast cancer, lung cancer and multiple myeloma (4-7). BST2 monoclonal antibody targeting myeloma or lung cancer cells induces celllular cytotoxicity and cell death (ADCC, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity). Thus BST2 serves as a potential target for tumor immunotherapy.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), also known as CD66e or CEACAM5, is a 180-200 kDa cell surface glycoprotein whose expression is elevated in intestinal carcinomas and other tumors. CEA mediates cell adhesion, though little more is known about its biological activity. Expression of CEA is correlated with tumerogenicity (1), and it has been shown to play a role in cell migration, adhesion and invasion in culture cells, as well as in metastasis in vivo (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DPP4 (CD26) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein expressed ubiquitously in most tissues and different cell types (1,2). The protein has a short cytoplasmic domain, transmembrane domain, a flexible stalk fragment and extracellular fragment (2). Both the catalytic peptide hydrolase domain and the beta-propeller ligand binding domain are located in the extracellular fragment (2). DPP4 is a multifunctional protein that exists in both a membrane bound form as well as an extracellular soluble form. As a peptidase, it removes N-terminal dipeptides sequentially from proteins with a proline or alanine as the penultimate P1 amino acid (3.4). DPP4 has been shown to cleave a wide range of substrates including GLP-1, BNP, substance P, etc. It is also involved in the regulation of related biological functions (5). In addition to it peptidase activity, DPP4 interacts with multiple important cell surface ligands, such as adenosine deaminase, fibronectin, and IGF2 receptor to influence processes like T cell activation, cell migration and proliferation (5). Several DPP4 inhibitors have been developed and their effects have been tested in the field of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and tumor immunity (2,5,6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated E-Cadherin (24E10) Rabbit mAb #3195.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycoprotein non-metastatic gene B (GPNMB) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein over expressed in many types of cancer. The GPNMB glycoprotein is involved in many physiological processes, including mediating transport of late melanosomes to keratinocytes (1), regulating osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function (2), stimulating dendritic cell maturation, promoting adhesion of dendritic cells to endothelial cells (3), enhancing autophagosome fusion to lysomes in tissue repair, and regulating degradation of cellular debris (4,5).While typical GPNMB expression is seen in tissues including skin, heart, kidney, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle (3,6), research studies show elevated GPNMB expression often contributes to the metastatic phenotype in numerous cancers (reviewed in 7). GPNMB is typically localized to intracellular compartments in normal cells (1,8), but investigators found it primarily on the cell surface of tumor cells (9,10). Differential localization and expression, and the role of GPNMB as a tumor promoter in many cancer types make this protein a viable therapeutic target (11).The GPNMB ectodomain can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases and shed from the cell surface (12). Research studies identify the sheddase ADAM10 as one peptidase responsible for cleavage of the GPNMB ectodomain at the surface of breast cancer cells. Shedded GPNMB ectodomains may promote angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell migration (13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins having distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).The αVβ5 integrin is expressed in various tissues and cell types, including endothelia, epithelia and fibroblasts (4). It plays a role in matrix adhesion to VN, FN, SPARC and bone sialoprotein (5) and functions in the invasion of gliomas and metastatic carcinoma cells (6,7). αVβ5 integrin plays a major role in growth-factor-induced tumor angiogenesis, where cooperative signaling by the αVβ5 integrin and growth factors regulates endothelial cell proliferation and survival (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are a group of zinc-dependent enzymes that target extracellular proteins, including growth factors, cell surface receptors, adhesion molecules, and other proteases (1). Matrix metalloproteinases can be broadly categorized based on function and cellular localization, and include six distinct membrane-type (MT) metalloproteinases that share a transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmic tail (2). Membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, MMP14) is involved in regulating development, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and tumor progression (3-6). MT1-MMP and other metalloproteinases promote tumor cell invasion by accumulating in specialized structures known as invadopodia, which remodel the ECM and allow tumor cells to breach the basement membrane (7). The abundance and presence of MT1-MMP at the cell surface is controlled by targeted endocytosis, which may be regulated by the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic domain (8). MT1-MMP protease activity can be further regulated through homodimer formation, autocatalytic processing, domain shedding and the interaction with inhibitory proteins. Activation of the MT1-MMP proenzyme results from cleavage of full-length MT1-MMP by furin in the trans-Golgi network, which removes the inhibitory propeptide domain (9). At the cell surface, MT1-MMP can be found in a protein complex with the soluble metalloproteinase MMP2 and the MMP inhibitor TIMP2. MT1-MMP mediated cleavage and activation of MMP2 generates the active MMP2 collagenase, which plays important roles in ECM remodeling and tumor invasion (10). MT1-MMP interacts with a large number of substrates in addition to MMP2, including interstitial collagens, adhesive glycoproteins (i.e. laminin), and cell surface receptors (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a member of the large family of gap junction proteins. Connexins assemble as a hexamer and are transported to the plasma membrane to create a hemichannel that can associate with hemichannels on nearby cells to create cell-to-cell channels. Clusters of these channels assemble to make gap junctions. Gap junction communication is important in development and regulation of cell growth. Phosphorylation of Cx43 is important in regulating assembly and function of gap junctions (1,2). Ser368 of Cx43 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) after activation by phorbol esters, which decreases cell-to-cell communication (3). Src can interact with and phosphorylate Cx43 to alter gap junction communication (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase involved in integrin-mediated signal transduction. It plays an important role in the control of several biological processes, including cell spreading, migration, and survival (1). Activation of FAK by integrin clustering leads to autophosphorylation at Tyr397, which is a binding site for the Src family kinases PI3K and PLCγ (2-5). Recruitment of Src family kinases results in the phosphorylation of Tyr407, Tyr576, and Tyr577 in the catalytic domain, and Tyr871 and Tyr925 in the carboxy-terminal region of FAK (6,7).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PSA/KLK3 (D6B1) XP® Rabbit mAb #5365.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TROP2 is a transmembrane glycoprotein encoded by gene TACSTD2 (tumor associated calcium signal transducer 2). TROP2 was first discovered as a biomarker of invasive trophoblast cells and later reported in many types of cancer cells as well as in various organs during development, and adult stem cells during homeostasis (1, 2). TROP2 has an extracellular domain with EGF thyroglobulin type-1 repeats, a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail with a HIKE domain containing a PIP2 binding site and PKC phosphoryaltion site (Ser303) (1-4). TROP2 functions by regulating multiple signaling pathways including-interaction of extracellular domain with integrin beta1 to regulate FAK signaling, association of its transmembrane domain with claudin1 and claudin7 for tight junction formation, as well as regulation of intracellular calcium release by its PIP2 binding and activation of the ERK/MAPK pathway (1,2, 5-8). All of these functions are important for its role in tumor proliferation, metastasis and invasion (1,2). PKC can phosphorylate TROP2 at Ser303; the phosphorylation changes the cytoplasmic tail conformation and further promotes its signaling (9). TROP2 can be activated through intramembrane proteolysis first by TACE, followed further cleavage by presenilin 1 and presenilin2. The proteolysis process is required for its role in tumor cell proliferation (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a 55-65 kDa, highly glycosylated, GPI-anchored cell surface receptor (the deglycosylated protein is 35 kDa) (1-3). It is a central player in the plasminogen activation pathway. uPAR binds with high affinity to a serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and converts plasminogen to its active form plasmin in a spatially restricted manner on the cell surface (4). Plasmin further carries out the activation of uPA, which is inhibited by serpins, such as plasminogen activator inhibitors (5). Therefore, uPAR plays a key role in regulating extracellular proteolysis. In addition, uPAR plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation, adhesion and mobility (6,7). Research studies have shown that overexpression of uPAR is found in various cancer cells and tissues (8,9).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
PathScan® Total PSA/KLK3 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of PSA/KLK3. A PSA/KLK3 Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, PSA/KLK3 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a PSA/KLK3 Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect the captured PSA/KLK3 protein. A HRP-linked, anti-mouse antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total PSA/KLK3.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calpain is a calcium-dependent thiol proteinase that is functionally active as a heterodimer composed of a small regulatory subunit and one of at least two large catalytic subunits (calpain 1 or calpain 2). In vitro, calpain 1 (mu-calpain) requires micromolar levels of calcium, while calpain 2 (M-calpain) requires millimolar levels of calcium for activation. The regulation of calpain in vivo is the subject of many current studies, which suggest that proteolytic activity is regulated post-transcriptionally by mechanisms such as calcium requirements, subcellular localization of the heterodimer, phosphorylation via the EGFR-Erk signaling cascade, endogenous inhibitors (calpastatin) and autoproteolytic cleavage (1). Calpastatin negatively regulates autoproteolytic cleavage of calpain 1 between Gly27 and Leu28 (2). Calpain influences cell migration by modifying rather than degrading its substrates responsible for cell adhesion and cytoskeletal arrangement. Control of calpain activity has caught the attention of drug development since limiting its activity could mute invasiveness of tumors or chronic inflammation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cathepsin D is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal aspartyl protease involved in the normal degradation of proteins (1). It is synthesized as an inactive 43 kDa preprocathepsin D that is cleaved and glycosylated to form a 46 kDa procathepsin D and then further cleaved to produce 28 kDa and 15 kDa subunits (heavy and light chains, respectively) (2). Cathepsin D may also be secreted into the cytosol during apoptosis and contribute to cleavage of substrates implicated in the apoptotic pathway (3). Numerous studies have suggested that cathepsin D plays a role in neuronal degradation and malignant transformation, particularily in breast cancer (4-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a member of the large family of gap junction proteins. Connexins assemble as a hexamer and are transported to the plasma membrane to create a hemichannel that can associate with hemichannels on nearby cells to create cell-to-cell channels. Clusters of these channels assemble to make gap junctions. Gap junction communication is important in development and regulation of cell growth. Phosphorylation of Cx43 is important in regulating assembly and function of gap junctions (1,2). Ser368 of Cx43 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) after activation by phorbol esters, which decreases cell-to-cell communication (3). Src can interact with and phosphorylate Cx43 to alter gap junction communication (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).The β1 subfamily includes 12 distinct integrin proteins that bind to different extracellular matrix molecules (4). Control of extracellular integrin binding influences cell adhesion and migration, while intracellular signaling messages relayed by the β1 cytoplasmic tail help to regulate cell proliferation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and gene expression (4). Research studies have implicated β1 integrin in various activities including embryonic development, blood vessel, skin, bone, and muscle formation, as well as tumor metastasis and angiogenesis (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2). αIIβ3 and αVβ3 are the two β3 containing integrins which are prominently expressed in hematopoietic cells and angiogenic endothelic cells and perform adhesive functions in hemostasis, wound healing and angiogenesis (1,4). Tyr773 and Tyr785 (usually referred to as Tyr747 and Tyr759 based on the chicken sequence) are phosphorylated upon ligand binding (5). Phosphorylation of these tyrosine residues is required for certain ligand-induced signaling (6). Thr779 (corresponding to Thr753 of the chicken sequence) of integrin β3 in the platelet specific αIIβ3 is phosphorylated by PKD and/or Akt, which may modulate integrin association with other signaling molecules (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteases that target many extracellular proteins including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9 have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (2-4). Research studies have shown that MMP activity correlates with cancer development (2). One mechanism of MMP regulation is transcriptional (5). Once synthesized, MMP exists as a latent proenzyme. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full length protein (5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase involved in integrin-mediated signal transduction. It plays an important role in the control of several biological processes, including cell spreading, migration, and survival (1). Activation of FAK by integrin clustering leads to autophosphorylation at Tyr397, which is a binding site for the Src family kinases PI3K and PLCγ (2-5). Recruitment of Src family kinases results in the phosphorylation of Tyr407, Tyr576, and Tyr577 in the catalytic domain, and Tyr871 and Tyr925 in the carboxy-terminal region of FAK (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Paxillin is a multidomain protein that localizes primarily to focal adhesion sites in the extracellular matrix (1). Paxillin is one of the key components of integrin signaling, and tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin is required for integrin-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization (2). Paxillin is phosphorylated by another focal adhesion component, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), at Tyr118 (3,4). Phospho-FAK (Tyr118) may provide a docking site for recruitment of other signaling molecules to focal adhesions. It has been shown that the SH2 domain of Crk binds to the phosphorylated Tyr118 of paxillin (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vinculin is a cytoskeletal protein that plays an important role in the regulation of focal adhesions and embryonic development (1-4). Three structural vinculin domains include an amino-terminal head, a short, flexible proline-rich region and a carboxy-terminal tail (1). In the inactive state, the head and tail domains of vinculin interact to form a closed confirmation. The open and active form of vinculin translocates to focal adhesions where it is thought to be involved in anchoring F-actin to the membrane and regulation of cell migration (2). Phospholipid binding to the tail domain and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin at Ser1033 and Ser1045 by PKC-α and Tyr100 and Tyr1065 by Src kinases weakens the head-tail interaction (5,6). This change in vinculin allows the binding of a number of other proteins, including talin, α-actinin and paxillin, which disrupts the head-tail interaction and initiates the conformational change from the inactive to active state (2,4). Vinculin deficiencies are associated with a decrease in cell adhesion and an increase in cell motility, suggesting a possible role in metastatic growth (7,8). This is supported by a demonstrated relationship between decreased vinculin expression and increased carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: βIG-H3 (TGFBI/RGD-CAP/Kerato-epithelin) is a 683-amino acid secretory protein induced by TGF-β that plays a role in cell adhesion, differentiation, and apoptosis (1-4). βIG-H3 contains an internal cysteine-rich EMI domain followed by four fasciclin-1 domains and a carboxy terminal RGD domain (1,2). It contributes to cell adhesion through interactions with integrins as well as a number of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen, fibronectin, and laminin (5-7). ECM βIG-H3 is found in a wide variety of tissues (8-12). Mutations in the βIG-H3 gene as well as elevated protein levels are most notably associated with corneal dystrophies (13).