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Product listing: IGFBP3 Antibody, UniProt ID P17936 #13216 to Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 594 Conjugate), UniProt ID P07196 #8743

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling plays a major role in regulating the proliferation and metabolism of normal and malignant cells. Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) play an integral role in modifying IGF actions in a wide variety of cell types. The six IGFBP family members share a high affinity for IGF binding and are structurally related, but are encoded by distinct genes (1). IGF binding proteins can exert stimulatory or inhibitory effects by controlling IGF availability through high affinity binding of IGF at the carboxy-terminal domain (2,3). IGFBP3 is the most abundant serum IGF binding protein and the main mediator for IGF-I bioactivities. IGFBP3 also binds IGF-II, insulin, and other cellular and extracellular components to regulate cell growth, development, and apoptosis through both IGF-dependent and IGF-independent mechanisms (4-8). Research studies describe correlations between increased IGF-I levels and reduced levels of IGFBP3 with increased risks of developing cancer, including breast, colon, lung, and prostate cancer (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), also known as Solute carrier family 7 member 5 (SLC7A5), is a high-affinity neutral transporter of larger amino acids. It facilitates the cellular amino acid uptake in a sodium independent manner (1-2) and selectively transports D-and L-isomers of small neutral amino acids (3). LAT1 also regulates amino acid exchange in conjunction with solute carrier family 1 member 5 (SLC1A5) (2,4-6). Transport of thyroid hormones across the placenta is established via LAT1 during normal fetal development (7). LAT1 promotes neuronal cell proliferation by regulating the transport of amino acids across the blood brain barrier (8). LAT1 is upregulated in various cancer types including breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and gliomas (9,10). High expression of LAT1 is detected in non-small cell lung cancer with lymph node metastases(9,11,12). Increased LAT1 expression is a novel biomarker of high grade malignancy in prostate cancers (12). Inhibition of LAT1 suppresses tumor cell growth in several tumor types (10,13).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) catalyzes the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA (1). It is the key enzyme in the biosynthesis and oxidation of fatty acids (1). In rodents, the 265 kDa ACC1 (ACCα) form is primarily expressed in lipogenic tissues, while 280 kDa ACC2 (ACCβ) is the main isoform in oxidative tissues (1,2). However, in humans, ACC2 is the predominant isoform in both lipogenic and oxidative tissues (1,2). Phosphorylation by AMPK at Ser79 or by PKA at Ser1200 inhibits the enzymatic activity of ACC (3). ACC is a potential target of anti-obesity drugs (4,5).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose and serves as an energy storage in mammalian muscle and liver (1). Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen biosynthesis and has two major isoforms in mammals -- muscle isoform (GYS1) and liver isoform (GYS2) respectively (1). Glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylate glycogen synthase at multiple sites in its C-terminus (Ser641, Ser645, Ser649 and Ser653) inhibiting its activity (2, 3). Hypoxia alters glycogen metabolism including temporal changes of GYS1 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells, suggesting the role of metabolic reprogramming of glycogen metabolism in cancer growth (1).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol, the rate-limiting step in lipolysis. Lipolytic stimuli activate adenylyl cyclase and thus increase intracellular cAMP levels, which in turn activate protein kinase A (PKA). PKA phosphorylates HSL at Ser563, Ser659, and Ser660, which stimulates HSL activity (1,2). In contrast, AMPK phosphorylates HSL at Ser565, which reduces HSL phosphorylation at Ser563 by PKA and inhibits HSL activity (2,3). Recent work indicates that phosphorylation at Ser600 by p44/42 MAPKs also enhances the enzymatic activity of HSL (4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol, the rate-limiting step in lipolysis. Lipolytic stimuli activate adenylyl cyclase and thus increase intracellular cAMP levels, which in turn activate protein kinase A (PKA). PKA phosphorylates HSL at Ser563, Ser659, and Ser660, which stimulates HSL activity (1,2). In contrast, AMPK phosphorylates HSL at Ser565, which reduces HSL phosphorylation at Ser563 by PKA and inhibits HSL activity (2,3). Recent work indicates that phosphorylation at Ser600 by p44/42 MAPKs also enhances the enzymatic activity of HSL (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Na(+)/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is one of the two main glucose transporters in the kidney proximal convoluted tubule. It is activated by Protein Kinase A and Protein Kinase C, likely through phosphorylation of Ser624 (1,2). SGLT2 is responsible for the majority of glucose reabsorption in the kidney (3,4), and mutations in SGLT2 are known to cause familial renal glucosuria (5,6). SGLT2 is a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes. Inhibitors of SGLT2 have been developed in order to treat people with type 2 diabetes (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The x(c)(-) cysteine/glutamate antiporter consists of a light chain subunit (xCT/SLC7A11) that confers substrate specificity and a glycosylated heavy chain subunit (4F2hc/SLC3A2) located on the cell surface (1,2). The heterodimeric amino acid transport system x(c)(-) provides selective import of cysteine into cells in exchange for glutamate and regulating intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, which is essential for cellular protection from oxidative stress (3). Research studies have shown that xCT expression increases in various tumors, including gliomas, and have implicated xCT in GSH-mediated anticancer drug resistance (4,5). Researchers have found that xCT provides neuroprotection by enhancing glutathione export from non-neuronal cells (6). Moreover, investigators identified xCT as the fusion-entry receptor for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (7).

$248
400 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lysine is subject to a wide array of regulatory post-translational modifications due to its positively charged ε-amino group side chain. The most prevalent of these are ubiquitination and acetylation, which are highly conserved among prokaryotes and eukaryotes (1,2). Acyl group transfer from the metabolic intermediates acetyl-, succinyl-, malonyl-, glutaryl-, butyryl-, propionyl-, and crotonyl-CoA all neutralize lysine’s positive charge and confer structural alterations affecting substrate protein function. Lysine acetylation is catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases, HATs, using acetyl-CoA as a cofactor (3,4). Deacylation is mediated by histone deacetylases, HDACs 1-11, and NAD-dependent Sirtuins 1-7. Some sirtuins have little to no deacetylase activity, suggesting that they are better suited for other acyl lysine substrates (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) are related kinases that regulate cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair (1). The identified substrates for ATM are p53, p95/NBS1, MDM2, Chk2, BRCA1, CtIP, 4E-BP1, and Chk1 (1,2) The essential requirement for the substrates of ATM/ATR is S*/T*Q. Hydrophobic amino acids at positions -3 and -1, and negatively charged amino acids at position +1 are positive determinants for substrate recognition by these kinases. Positively charged residues surrounding the S*/T*Q are negative determinants for substrate phosphorylation (3). The complex phenotype of AT cells suggests that it likely has additional substrates (3). To better understand the kinase and identify substrates for ATM and the related kinase ATR, CST has developed antibodies that recognize phosphorylated serine or threonine in the S*/T*Q motif.

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in carcinogenesis (1), chronic infection, inflammation (2) and neurodegeneration (3). High levels of both superoxide and nitric oxide in tissues interact to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant that can modify Tyr residues in proteins to form 3-nitro-tyrosine (4). Tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase results in loss of enzymatic activity (4). The nitration of p53 at Tyr residues abolishes its capacity for binding to its DNA consensus sequence (5).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/common/content/content.jsp?id=ptmscan-services.

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/common/content/content.jsp?id=ptmscan-services.

Background: Neurotrophins are comprised of at least four family members including NGF, BDNF, NT-3 and NT-4 and all are known to influence growth, development, differentiation and survival of neurons (1). Proneurotrophis bind to p75NTR but not to the family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (Trk) and following maturation, BDNF binds and activates TrkB. Trk receptors in turn activate three major signaling pathways: (a) Ras-MAPK signaling, which promotes neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth, (b) PI3 Kinase-Akt signaling, which promotes survival and growth of neurons, and (c) PLC-γ1-PKC signaling, which promotes synaptic plasticity (2). BDNF is a major regulator of transmission and plasticity at adult synapses. Moreover, the precursor proBDNF and the mature protein mBDNF drive opposite effects on long-term potentiation and long-term depression (3). BDNF has also been implicated in body weight regulation and activity: heterozygous BDNF knockout mice are hyperphagic, obese, and hyperactive (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Bassoon (BSN), named such to underline its presumptive role in orchestrating events of the synaptic vesicle cycle (1), is a very large coiled-coil protein and is one of the core components of the cytomatrix at the active zones of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses (2). BSN is a scaffold protein that is a component of the synaptic ribbon, an electron-dense structure anchored at the active zone that tethers synaptic vesicles. Genetic disruption of BSN displaces the anchoring of ribbons to the active zones of photoreceptors and cochlear inner hair cells (3), and this displacement of the ribbons substantially impairs synaptic transmission, suggesting that, when present, BSN is important for the vesicle cycle (4).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Calbindin (D1I4Q) XP® Rabbit mAb #13176.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The endocannabinoid system consists of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2 receptors, the enzymes that produce and degrade the endogenous cannabinoid ligands (such as FAAH, DAG lipases, and MAG lipase), and the endocannabinoid ligands derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (1-3). CB1 receptor belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and harbors a large N-terminal extracellular domain, seven transmembrane domains, and a C-terminal intracellular tail. CB1 receptor is coupled to the Gai/o subunit of the G protein which inhibits adenylyl cyclases and regulates calcium and potassium ion channels (4). CB1 receptor is one of the most abundant GPCRs in the central nervous system. It has been show to play critical roles in the wiring of the brain during development (5), in neuronal plasticity (6), analgesia, drug abuse and metabolic homeostasis (7). In addition, CB1 receptor has been shown to interact with other GPCRs, to give rise to novel pharmacological and signaling heteromers with implication in diseases (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate dehydrogenase is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate through association with the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (1). Glutamate dehydrogenase is highly expressed in various tissues such as the liver, brain, kidney, heart, pancreas, ovaries, and testis. Two isoforms produced by two distinct genes are found in mammalian tissues. The GLUD1 gene is ubiquitously expressed (2), while the GLUD2 gene is specifically expressed in testicular tissues and astrocytes (3,4). Glutamate dehydrogenase links glutamate to the Krebs cycle, thereby playing a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Research studies have shown that changes in glutamate dehydrogenase activity in pancreatic β-cells can cause a hyperinsulinism syndrome (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is a neuronal phosphoprotein that regulates the structure and stability of microtubules, neuronal morphogenesis, cytoskeleton dynamics, and organelle trafficking in axons and dendrites (1). Multiple MAP2 isoforms are expressed in neurons, including high molecular weight MAP2A and MAP2B (280 and 270 kDa), and low molecular weight MAP2C and MAP2D (70 and 75 kDa). Phosphorylation of MAP2 modulates its association with the cytoskeleton and is developmentally regulated. GSK-3 and p44/42 MAP kinase phosphorylate MAP2 at Ser136, Thr1620, and Thr1623 (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr1620/1623 by GSK-3 inhibits MAP2 association with microtubules and microtubule stability (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an abundant central nervous system (CNS) myelin membrane protein that plays an important role in nerve myelination. Myelin sheaths are multi-layered membranes derived from oligodendrocytes that increase the conduction velocity of axonal impulses. MBP helps to adhere the cytoplasmic leaflets of adjacent oligodendrocyte membranes to one another. Several splice variants of MBP are expressed in cells and the protein is modified following translation (i.e. phosphorylation, methylation), which suggests additional membrane adhesion functions (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat brain. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb #2837.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).