Interested in promotions? | Click here >>

Product listing: MAP2 (D5G1) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P11137 #8707 to β-Amyloid Antibody, UniProt ID P05067 #2454

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is a neuronal phosphoprotein that regulates the structure and stability of microtubules, neuronal morphogenesis, cytoskeleton dynamics, and organelle trafficking in axons and dendrites (1). Multiple MAP2 isoforms are expressed in neurons, including high molecular weight MAP2A and MAP2B (280 and 270 kDa), and low molecular weight MAP2C and MAP2D (70 and 75 kDa). Phosphorylation of MAP2 modulates its association with the cytoskeleton and is developmentally regulated. GSK-3 and p44/42 MAP kinase phosphorylate MAP2 at Ser136, Thr1620, and Thr1623 (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr1620/1623 by GSK-3 inhibits MAP2 association with microtubules and microtubule stability (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat brain. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb #2837.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Neurogenin 2 (Ngn2, NeuroG2) is a proneural, basic helix-loop-helix transcription (bHLH) factor and member of the neurogenin family that includes neurogenin 1 and neurogenin 3 (1). Neurogenin 2 is expressed in neuronal progenitor cells, is required for generation of glutamatergic neurons and is commonly used as a marker of neuronal differentiation (2,3). Neurogenin 2 upregulates a number of targets including the bHLH transcription factor NeuroD (4). Phosphorylation of Ngn2 at Tyr241 controls migration and dendritic morphology of cortical neurons (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons, regulating the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, but high levels of kinase activity are detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no discrete substrates have been attributed as a function of p35 vs. p39. Amongst many, substrates of CDK5 include p35 and p39. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, and this is likely a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). NGF activates Erk and EGR1, and induces p35 expression in PC12 cells (3). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Accumulation of p25 is found in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (4-5).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The unconjugated Phospho-CREB (Ser133) (87G3) Rabbit mAb #9198 reacts with human, mouse and rat phospho-CREB (Ser133) protein. CST expects that Phospho-CREB (Ser133) (87G3) Rabbit mAb (Biotinylated) #4095 will also recognize phospho-CREB (Ser133) in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rhodopsin is the photoreceptor in the retinal rods. It is activated by photons, transduces visual information through its cognate G protein, transducin, and is inactivated by arrestin binding (1). Using atomic-force microscopy, rhodopsin was found to be arranged into paracrystalline arrays of dimers in mouse disc membranes (2). Rhodopsin is considered to be the prototype of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and is the first GPCR for which a crystal structure was solved (3). Research studies have linked mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin to retinitis pigmentosa (4,5), a disease characterized by retinal degeneration resulting in reduced peripheral vision and night blindness (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Serine racemase, also called SRR, is an enzyme that is highly expressed in the brain and converts L-serine to D-serine (1,2). D-serine is a co-agonist of the NMDA receptor. NMDA receptor activation requires the binding of glutamate to its GluN2 subunit and the concomitant binding of either glycine or D-serine to its glycine binding site on the GluN1 subunit (3). Decreased activation of NMDA receptors is a typical feature of impaired synaptic plasticity in age-related memory deficits. Therefore, D-serine availability makes serine racemase an important therapeutic target for memory deficit associated with nonpathological aging (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Spinophilin is an 815 amino acid protein composed of a PDZ domain, 2 actin-binding domains, a receptor- and PP1-binding domain, three coiled-coiled domains, a potential leucine/isoleucine zipper motif, and three potential SH3 domains (1). Spinophilin interacts with a large number of proteins including ion channel components and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Spinophilin also interacts with actin filaments; phosphorylation of spinophilin at Ser94 and Ser177 disrupts this interaction (2). Spinophilin has been shown to affect GPCR function through two different mechanisms: spinophilin acts as a functional inhibitor of α-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated arrestin signaling by competing with GRK2 binding to the adrenergic receptor (3) and spinophilin facilitates μ-opioid receptor desensitization by promoting receptor endocytosis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tenascin C is a large hexameric extracellular matrix glycoprotein that exhibits de-adhesive effects on cell-matrix interaction, enhancing cell proliferation and motility in most cell types. It is highly expressed in remodeling tissues during embryonic development and under pathological conditions in adults, and research studies have shown markedly increased expression in cancerous tissues (1,2). Tenascin C has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes relevant to atherosclerosis, including cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Expression of Tenascin C is tightly controlled in adults and is upregulated in tissues undergoing wound healing (3). In development, the expression of Tenascin C is known to be associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) events including gastrulation and formation of the neural crest, endocardial cushion, and secondary palate (1). Investigators have shown that Tenascin C is a key determinant of the tumor stroma and that it is involved in the initiation of tumorigenesis and progression to metastasis (2). Immature and mature astrocytes, radial glial cells, Schwann cells, and a subset of neurons express Tenascin C. Upon CNS trauma or exposure of neurons to excitotoxic agents, Tenascin C expression is upregulated by glial cells. Research studies have shown that Tenascin C is involved in guidance of migrating axons and neurons, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal regeneration, promoting spinal cord regeneration after injury (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TFAM (Transcription Factor A, Mitochondrial; aka TCF6) is a member of the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins because it contains two HMG boxes. TFAM is a transcription factor for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and enhances mtDNA transcription in a promoter-specific fashion in the presence of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor B (1). Because the majority of ATP production depends on the mitochondrial respiratory chain, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome is critical for normal health. TFAM plays an essential role in the maintenance of mtDNA and thus, ATP production (2). TFAM binds to mtDNA both nonspecifically and in a sequence-specific manner. It is known to have a dual effect on mtDNA: protection of mtDNA and initiation of transcription from mtDNA (3). TFAM attenuates age-dependent impairment of the brain by preventing oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in microglia (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Netrin proteins belong to an evolutionarily conserved family of laminin-like molecules that are involved in axon guidance and vascular development. These secreted proteins can have opposing functions depending on specific receptor association. For example, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) family receptors typically mediate cellular attraction (1,2) while netrin bound to UNC5 family receptors induce cellular repulsion (2-4). The uncoordinated 5B homolog (UNC5B) is a transmembrane protein with extracellular Ig-like domains and an intracellular region containing a protein-binding death domain and a putative DCC interaction domain (2). Homodimers composed of DCC receptor proteins mediate axonal attraction responses, while UNC5B homodimers and UNC5B-DCC heterodimers promote cellular repulsion (2). The netrin receptor UNC5B mediates apoptosis in the absence of netrin through the activation of DAP kinase (5) and is involved in leukocyte migration inhibition (6). Expression of UNC5B correlates with bladder cancer stage and the receptor is a potential predictor of both bladder and colorectal cancer prognosis and possible disease recurrence (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamatergic neurons release glutamate, the most common excitatory neurotransmitter. Their synaptic vesicles are filled with glutamate by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs (1). VGLUT1, also called solute carrier family 17 member 7 (SLC17A7), was first identified as an inorganic phosphate transporter (2). Despite the absence of homology with neurotransmitter transporters, VGLUT1 was later demonstrated to be a glutamate transporter (1) specific to glutamatergic neurons (3). Closely related to VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are also involved in glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles, but define different neuronal subpopulations (4,5). VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are the most abundant isoforms. VGLUT1 is expressed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex, while VGLUT2 is mostly found in the thalamus (6,7). VGLUT3 is expressed in hair cells of the auditory system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).β3-tubulin (TUBB3) is one of six β-tubulin isoforms and is expressed highly during fetal and postnatal development (axon guidance and maturation) (2). Its expression levels decrease in the adult central nervous system (CNS) but remain high in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (3). Microtubules enriched in β3-tubulin are more dynamic than those composed of other β-tubulin isoforms (4). Research studies have shown that mutations in the β3-tubulin gene TUBB3 cause ocular motility defects and other nervous system disorders. Furthermore, β3-tubulin is present in neoplastic but not in normal differentiated glial cells. Thus, β3-tubulin is a great neuronal marker (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Leucine-rich repeat containing 8 family member A (LRRC8A) belongs to the leucine-rich repeat family of proteins. It is also named SWELL1. LRRC8A forms a heteromeric complex called the volume regulated anion channel (VRAC) with other family members such as LRRC8B, LRRC8C, LRRC8D, or LRRC8E. VRAC maintains cell volume in response to extracellular or intracellular osmotic changes (1,2). The LRRC8A-containing VRAC complex senses ionic strength and is activated by hypotonic stress (3). LRRC8A is also involved in B cell development. Mutations in the LRRC8A gene causes agammaglobulinemia, which is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by severely low or absent serum antibodies and circulating B-cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Parkin is a protein of 465 amino acids with an amino-terminal ubiquitin domain and a carboxy-terminal RING-box (1). In the case of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP), deletions have been found in the gene on chromosome 6 encoding the protein Parkin (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) forms a heterodimer of at least one NR1 and one NR2A-D subunit. Multiple receptor isoforms with distinct brain distributions and functional properties arise by selective splicing of the NR1 transcripts and differential expression of the NR2 subunits. NR1 subunits bind the co-agonist glycine and NR2 subunits bind the neurotransmitter glutamate. Activation of the NMDA receptor or opening of the ion channel allows flow of Na+ and Ca2+ ions into the cell, and K+ out of the cell (1). Each subunit has a cytoplasmic domain that can be directly modified by the protein kinase/phosphatase (2). PKC can phosphorylate the NR1 subunit (NMDAR1) of the receptor at Ser890/Ser896, and PKA can phosphorylate NR1 at Ser897 (3). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKC decreases its affinity for calmodulin, thus preventing the inhibitory effect of calmodulin on NMDAR (4). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKA probably counteracts the inhibitory effect of calcineurin on the receptor (5). NMDAR mediates long-term potentiation and slow postsynaptic excitation, which play central roles in learning, neurodevelopment, and neuroplasticity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glutamatergic neurons release glutamate, the most common excitatory neurotransmitter. Their synaptic vesicles are filled with glutamate by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs (1). VGLUT1, also called solute carrier family 17 member 7 (SLC17A7), was first identified as an inorganic phosphate transporter (2). Despite the absence of homology with neurotransmitter transporters, VGLUT1 was later demonstrated to be a glutamate transporter (1) specific to glutamatergic neurons (3). Closely related to VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are also involved in glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles, but define different neuronal subpopulations (4,5). VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are the most abundant isoforms. VGLUT1 is expressed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex, while VGLUT2 is mostly found in the thalamus (6,7). VGLUT3 is expressed in hair cells of the auditory system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).