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Antibody Sampler Kit Atp Biosynthetic Process

The AMPK Subunit Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the role played by all AMPK subunits in cellular energy homeostasis. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots with each antibody.

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

The Glycolysis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate select enzymes involved in glycolysis. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Phospho-Akt Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of the Akt signaling pathway, including PTEN and phosphorylated Akt, GSK-3beta, c-Raf and PDK1. The kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

The Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewed in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The Human Reactive Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewed in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The Parkinson's Research Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting target proteins related to Parkinson's disease. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Mitochondrial Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate relevant mitochondial proteins. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Innate Immunity Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in innate immunity using phospho-specific, cleavage-specific, and control antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system responds rapidly to pathogens by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). There are several families of PRRs. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane PRRs and signal through recruitment of adaptor proteins, including MyD88, which leads to recruitment and phosphorylation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, followed by activation of NF-κB and MAP kinases (1-3). Some TLRs also activate IRFs, which upregulate the type I interferon response. Activation of TLR3 and TLR4 results in phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3, while TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 lead to activation of IRF-7 (2, 3). STING is a multi-pass ER transmembrane protein that is activated in response to intracellular DNA downstream of DNA-sensing cytoplasmic PRRs, such as DDX41, or by binding the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) produced by cGAS (4-6). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes, leading to phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3 and NF-κB (7, 8). Following activation and translocation, STING gets phosphorylated by ULK1, resulting in STING inactivation and degradation (9). Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic multimeric protein complexes that assemble in response to PAMPs or DAMPs detected by AIM2 or members of the nod-like receptor (NLR) family, such as NLRP3 (10). Inflammasomes activate Caspase-1, which cleaves the IL-1β and IL-18 precursor proteins into the mature forms (10).

The Mouse Reactive Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewed in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The HSP/Chaperone Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate protein folding within the cell. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments with each antibody.
Senescence Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple components of the SASP. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Senescence is characterized by stable stress-induced proliferative arrest and resistance to mitogenic stimuli, as well as the secretion of proteins such as cytokines, growth factors and proteases. These secreted proteins comprise the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescent cells are thought to accumulate as an organism ages, and contribute to age-related diseases, including cancer, through promotion of inflammation and disruption of normal cellular function (1,2). The composition of the SASP varies, and SASP components can be either beneficial or deleterious in human disease, depending on the context (3).Senescence Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) Antibody Sampler Kit provides a collection of antibodies to various SASP components, including TNF-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), the multifunctional cytokine IL-1beta, the chemokines CXCL10, RANTES/CCL5 and MCP-1, the matrix metalloprotease MMP3, and the serine-protease inhibitor PAI-1.

The Pyroptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting proteins that are used as readouts for pyroptosis. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Pyroptosis is a regulated pathway of cell death with morphological features of necrosis, including cell swelling, plasma membrane pore formation, and engagement of an inflammatory response with the release of a number of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18 (1,2). Pyroptosis is generally induced in cells of the innate immune system, such as monocytes, marcrophages, and dendritic cells in the presence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microbial pathogens or by cell-derived DAMPs. It is induced through assembly of inflammasomes triggering proteolytic activation of caspase-1 which then cleaves inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18 to their mature forms (3). A critical feature of pyroptosis is the cleavage of Gasdermin D by caspase-1 and mouse caspase-11 (or human caspase-4/5) (4-6). Upon cleavage the N-terminal fragment of Gasdermin D oligomerizes to form a pore allowing secretion of inflammatory DAMPs and cytokines. Canonical inflammasome assembly typically consists of a cytosolic-pattern recognition receptor (PPR; a nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like family members), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. Distinct inflammasome complexes can recognize distinct PAMPs and DAMPs to trigger pyroptosis. The best characterized pathway triggered by the NLR, NLRP3, occurs through a two-step process. The first step is a priming signal, NF-κB is activated to induce the expression of a number of inflammasome components including NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18. In the second activation step, caspase-1 is activated and Gasdermin D and cytokines are proteolytically activated. In a non-canonical pathway, caspase-4 and caspase-5 can directly trigger Gasdermin D cleavage in monocytes following LPS stimulation (5,7).

The Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means to evaluate the endogenous levels of HDACs. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

The Class I HDAC Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting Class I HDAC proteins using control antibodies against HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

The Exosomal Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the presence of exosomal markers. The kit includes enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments for each target.
The PTEN and PDK1 Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate two key enzymes that regulate multiple signaling pathways. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots per primary antibody.

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).