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Antibody Sampler Kit Cell

The Jumonji Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of Jumonji family proteins. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The ALK Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of multiple members of the ALK pathway, including phosphorylated ALK, Jak2, Jak3, Stat3, Stat5, PLCγ1, Akt, Src, and p44/42 MAPK. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor for pleiotrophin (PTN), a growth factor involved in embryonic brain development (1-3). In ALK-expressing cells, PTN induces phosphorylation of both ALK and the downstream effectors IRS-1, Shc, PLCγ, and PI3 kinase (1). ALK was originally discovered as a nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion protein produced by a translocation (4). Investigators have found that the NPM-ALK fusion protein is a constitutively active, oncogenic tyrosine kinase associated with anaplastic lymphoma (4). Research literature suggests that activation of PLCγ by NPM-ALK may be a crucial step for its mitogenic activity and involved in the pathogenesis of anaplastic lymphomas (5).A distinct ALK oncogenic fusion protein involving ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4 (EML4) has been described in the research literature from a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, with corresponding fusion transcripts present in some cases of lung adenocarcinoma. The short, amino-terminal region of the microtubule-associated protein EML4 is fused to the kinase domain of ALK (6-8).

The Neuronal Marker IF Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means for labeling neuronal structures by immunofluorescence (IF-F). This kit includes enough primary antibody to perform at least forty IF-F tests or two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The AMPA Receptor (GluA) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating the four subunits of AMPARs. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each antibody.

Background: AMPA- (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid), kainate-, and NMDA- (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors are the three main families of ionotropic glutamate-gated ion channels. AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are comprised of four subunits (GluR 1-4), which assemble as homo- or hetero-tetramers to mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmissions in the central nervous system. AMPARs are implicated in synapse formation, stabilization, and plasticity (1). In contrast to GluR 2-containing AMPARs, AMPARs that lack GluR 2 are permeable to calcium (2). Post-transcriptional modifications (alternative splicing, nuclear RNA editing) and post-translational modifications (glycosylation, phosphorylation) result in a very large number of permutations, fine-tuning the kinetic properties of AMPARs. Research studies have implicated activity changes in AMPARs in a variety of diseases including Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke, and epilepsy (1).

The Rab Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the presence and status of Rab proteins in cells. This kit provides enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The PDGF Receptor β Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating levels of PDGF Receptor protein phosphorylated at the specified sites, as well as total PDGF receptor levels. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two Western blot experiments per antibody.

Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) family proteins exist as several disulphide-bonded, dimeric isoforms (PDGF AA, PDGF AB, PDGF BB, PDGF CC, and PDGF DD) that bind in a specific pattern to two closely related receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) and PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ share 75% to 85% sequence homology between their two intracellular kinase domains, while the kinase insert and carboxy-terminal tail regions display a lower level (27% to 28%) of homology (1). PDGFRα homodimers bind all PDGF isoforms except those containing PDGF D. PDGFRβ homodimers bind PDGF BB and DD isoforms, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer. The heteromeric PDGF receptor α/β binds PDGF B, C, and D homodimers, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer (2). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ can each form heterodimers with EGFR, which is also activated by PDGF (3). Various cells differ in the total number of receptors present and in the receptor subunit composition, which may account for responsive differences among cell types to PDGF binding (4). Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, followed by binding and activation of cytoplasmic SH2 domain-containing signal transduction molecules, such as GRB2, Src, GAP, PI3 kinase, PLCγ, and NCK. A number of different signaling pathways are initiated by activated PDGF receptors and lead to control of cell growth, actin reorganization, migration, and differentiation (5). Tyr751 in the kinase-insert region of PDGFRβ is the docking site for PI3 kinase (6). Phosphorylated pentapeptides derived from Tyr751 of PDGFRβ (pTyr751-Val-Pro-Met-Leu) inhibit the association of the carboxy-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase with PDGFRβ (7). Tyr740 is also required for PDGFRβ-mediated PI3 kinase activation (8).

The ULK1 Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical way to investigate ULK1 signaling. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.

Background: Two related serine/threonine kinases, UNC-51-like kinase 1 and 2 (ULK1, ULK2), were discovered as mammalian homologs of the C. elegans gene UNC-51 in which mutants exhibited abnormal axonal extension and growth (1-4). Both proteins are widely expressed and contain an amino-terminal kinase domain followed by a central proline/serine rich domain and a highly conserved carboxy-terminal domain. The roles of ULK1 and ULK2 in axon growth have been linked to studies showing that the kinases are localized to neuronal growth cones and are involved in endocytosis of critical growth factors, such as NGF (5). Yeast two-hybrid studies found ULK1/2 associated with modulators of the endocytic pathway, SynGAP and syntenin (6). Structural similarity of ULK1/2 has also been recognized with the yeast autophagy protein Atg1/Apg1 (7). Knockdown experiments using siRNA demonstrated that ULK1 is essential for autophagy (8), a catabolic process for the degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (9,10). It appears that Atg1/ULK1 can act as a convergence point for multiple signals that control autophagy (11), and can bind to several autophagy-related (Atg) proteins, regulating phosphorylation states and protein trafficking (12-16).

The Organelle Localization IF Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means for identification of cellular organelles by fluorescence immunocytochemistry (IF-IC). This kit includes enough primary antibody to perform at least twenty IF-IC tests or two western blots with each antibody.
The Angiogenesis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the angiogenic pathway downstream of VEGFR2. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary antibody.
The Src Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of Src family member proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blots with each antibody.

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

The GSK-3 Antibody Sampler Kit contains primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots with each antibody.

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

The PTEN and PDK1 Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate two key enzymes that regulate multiple signaling pathways. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots per primary antibody.

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

The Phospho-Erk1/2 Pathway Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating multiple members of the Erk pathway as well as their activation state. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

The Phospho-Akt Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of the Akt signaling pathway, including PTEN and phosphorylated Akt, GSK-3beta, c-Raf and PDK1. The kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

The Phospho-EGF Receptor Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating the EGF Receptor and several phosphorylation sites that are involved in its activation. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

The mTOR Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to investigate the control of protein translation, cell growth, and proliferation through mTOR signaling within cells. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).

The Toll-Like Receptor Antibody Sampler Kit is an economical way to examine the total protein levels of a number of toll-like receptors. This kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments with each antibody.

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

The Matrix Remodeling Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting different MMPs and TIMPs using the specific corresponding antibodies. The kit contains enough antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Matrix remodeling is mainly controlled by MMPs and TIMPs. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are a group of zinc-dependent enzymes that target extracellular proteins, including growth factors, cell surface receptors, adhesion molecules, matrix structural proteins, and other proteases (1, 2). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP14 (MT1-MMP) have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (3). MMP activity is regulated by mechanisms of both transcriptional control and post translational protein processing. Once synthesized, MMPs exist as latent proenzymes. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full-length protein (4). MMP activity can be inhibited through its binding to endogenously expressed TIMPs. TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases that include TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding MMPs and chelating their zinc cofactor at the catalytic site to inhibit the proteinase function (5,6).

The Neuronal Marker IF Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means for labeling cell types and cell structures by immunofluorescence (IF-F).
The Silent Synapses Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) using phospho-specific and control antibodies. AMPARs expression can be compared to other synaptic components including NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluN1 and the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD95. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: AMPA- (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid), kainate-, and NMDA- (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors are the three main families of ionotropic glutamate-gated ion channels. AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are composed of four subunits (GluA1-4), which assemble as homo- or hetero-tetramers to mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmissions in the central nervous system. AMPARs are implicated in synapse formation, stabilization, and plasticity (1). In contrast to GluA2-containing AMPARs, AMPARs that lack GluA2 are permeable to calcium (2). Post-transcriptional modifications (alternative splicing, nuclear RNA editing) and post-translational modifications (glycosylation, phosphorylation) result in a very large number of permutations, fine-tuning the kinetic properties and surface expression of AMPARs representing key pathways to mediate synaptic plasticity (3). During development and mature states, some synapses exhibit “silent synapses” that lack functional AMPAR-mediated transmission. Synapses become “unsilenced” by post-translational modification of GluAs, particularly GluA1, which alters its kinetic properties and/or surface expression while other synaptic components, such as other glutamate receptors like NMDARs and postsynaptic scaffolding proteins like PSD95, remain unaltered. Conversely, reducing the AMPAR kinetic properties and surface expression can silence synapses. Key post-translational modifications implicated in regulating these processes include phosphorylation of GluA1 at Ser831 and Ser845 (4). Research studies have implicated activity-dependent changes in AMPARs in a variety of diseases, including Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke, and epilepsy (1).