Interested in promotions? | Click here >>

Antibody Sampler Kit Protein Oligomerization

Also showing Antibody Sampler Kit Positive Regulation of Protein Oligomerization, Antibody Sampler Kit Regulation of Protein Oligomerization

The Pro-Apoptosis Bcl-2 Family Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means to examine several members of the Bcl-2 family. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

The Human Reactive Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewd in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The Pro-Apoptosis Bcl-2 Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several members of the Bcl-2 family and their activation status. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

The Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewd in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The Autophagy Vesicle Nucleation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting target proteins involved in autophagosome formation and maturation. The kit contains enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The Cell Cycle/Checkpoint Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating multiple proteins involved in the cell cyle and checkpoint control. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform four Western blot experiments.

Background: The cell division cycle demands accuracy to avoid the accumulation of genetic damage. This process is controlled by molecular circuits called "checkpoints" that are common to all eukaryotic cells (1). Checkpoints monitor DNA integrity and cell growth prior to replication and division at the G1/S and G2/M transitions, respectively. The cdc2-cyclin B kinase is pivotal in regulating the G2/M transition (2,3). Cdc2 is phosphorylated at Thr14 and Tyr15 during G2-phase by the kinases Wee1 and Myt1, rendering it inactive. The tumor suppressor protein retinoblastoma (Rb) controls progression through the late G1 restriction point (R) and is a major regulator of the G1/S transition (4). During early and mid G1-phase, Rb binds to and represses the transcription factor E2F (5). The phosphorylation of Rb late in G1-phase by CDKs induces Rb to dissociate from E2F, permitting the transcription of S-phase-promoting genes. In vitro, Rb can be phosphorylated at multiple sites by cdc2, cdk2, and cdk4/6 (6-8). DNA damage triggers both the G2/M and the G1/S checkpoints. DNA damage activates the DNA-PK/ATM/ATR kinases, which phosphorylate Chk at Ser345 (9), Chk2 at Thr68 (10) and p53 (11). The Chk kinases inactivate cdc25 via phosphorylation at Ser216, blocking the activation of cdc2.

The Matrix Remodeling Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting different MMPs and TIMPs using the specific corresponding antibodies. The kit contains enough antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Matrix remodeling is mainly controlled by MMPs and TIMPs. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are a group of zinc-dependent enzymes that target extracellular proteins, including growth factors, cell surface receptors, adhesion molecules, matrix structural proteins, and other proteases (1, 2). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP14 (MT1-MMP) have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (3). MMP activity is regulated by mechanisms of both transcriptional control and post translational protein processing. Once synthesized, MMPs exist as latent proenzymes. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full-length protein (4). MMP activity can be inhibited through its binding to endogenously expressed TIMPs. TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases that include TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding MMPs and chelating their zinc cofactor at the catalytic site to inhibit the proteinase function (5,6).

The IRAK Isoform Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine total protein levels of the four Interleukin-1 Receptor Associated Kinase family members: IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4.

Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) is a serine/threonine-specific kinase that can be coprecipitated in an IL-1-inducible manner with the IL-1 receptor (1). The mammalian family of IRAK molecules contains four members (IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4). The binding of IL-1 to IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) initiates the formation of a complex that includes IL-1RI, AcP, MyD88, and IRAKs (2). IRAK undergoes autophosphorylation shortly after IL-1 stimulation. The subsequent events involve IRAK dissociation from the IL-1RI complex, its ubiquitination, and its association with two membrane-bound proteins: TAB2 and TRAF6. The resulting IRAK-TRAF6-TAB2 complex is then released into the cytoplasm where it activates protein kinase cascades, including TAK1, IKKs, and the stress-activated kinases (3).

The DUB Antibody Sampler Kit offers an economical means of evaluating the presence and status of selected DUB enzymes. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary.
The Stress and Apoptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating stress and apoptotic responses of each protein. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The SQSTM1/p62-like Receptor Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting members of the SQSTM1/p62-like Receptor (SLR) family. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosome-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Selective autophagy targets the degradation of distinct sets of substrates and organelles and can occur through the utilization of a number of autophagy cargo receptors (3-5). Autophagy cargo receptors contain an LC3-interacting region (LIR) required for interaction with Atg8/LC3 family members targeted to the autophagosome. SQSTM1/p62-like receptors (SLRs) are a family of autophagy cargo receptors that contain domains for binding to ubiquitin. This family includes prototypical member SQSTM1/p62, NBR1, NDP52, Optineurin, and TAX1BP1. Targets of SLRs include ubiquitylated protein aggregates (aggrephagy), organelles such as mitochondria (mitoophagy) and peroxisomes (pexophagy), and intracellular bacteria (xenophagy).Upon binding of cargo to these receptors, the complex is delivered to the autophagosome where both the cargo and receptor are degraded through the autophagic process. While some redundancy may exist among SLR family members, they can have unique activities. Many SLRs can have additional roles as scaffolding proteins for various signaling pathways. For example, SQSTM1/p62 interacts with KEAP1, a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (6). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1/p62 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

The Cardiogenesis Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating proteins involved in heart development. This kit contains enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The p53 Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting p53 activity using modification-specific and control antibodies. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

Senescence Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple components of the SASP. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Senescence is characterized by stable stress-induced proliferative arrest and resistance to mitogenic stimuli, as well as the secretion of proteins such as cytokines, growth factors and proteases. These secreted proteins comprise the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescent cells are thought to accumulate as an organism ages, and contribute to age-related diseases, including cancer, through promotion of inflammation and disruption of normal cellular function (1,2). The composition of the SASP varies, and SASP components can be either beneficial or deleterious in human disease, depending on the context (3).Senescence Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) Antibody Sampler Kit provides a collection of antibodies to various SASP components, including TNF-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), the multifunctional cytokine IL-1beta, the chemokines CXCL10, RANTES/CCL5 and MCP-1, the matrix metalloprotease MMP3, and the serine-protease inhibitor PAI-1.

The Mitochondrial Dynamics Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine signaling involved in mitochondrial dynamics. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: Import of proteins into the mitochondria is regulated by the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex, which facilitates transport through the outer mitochondrial membrane, and a complementary translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complex, responsible for protein transport to the mitochondrial matrix. The TOM complex consists of the receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70, and the channel-forming protein Tom40 (1). Tom20 is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and initially recognizes precursors with a presequence to facilitate protein import across the outer mitochondrial membrane (2).Changes in mitochondrial dynamics regulated by environmental cues affect mitochondrial size and shape and have been shown to dramatically impact mitochondrial metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy (3). These processes are largely controlled by mitochondrial dynamin-related GTPases, including mitofusin-1, mitofusin-2, OPA1, and DRP1. DRP1 regulates mitochondrial fission, while the mitofusins and OPA1 control fusion at the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane, respectively. These proteins are tightly regulated. OPA1 activity is regulated through alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, including complex proteolytic processing by multiple proteases (4-9). In addition, OPA1 expression can be induced under conditions of metabolic demand through a pathway involving Parkin induced NF-κB activation (10). DRP1 is regulated in part through multiple phosphorylation sites (11). Phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by MAPK or during mitosis by CDKs stimulates mitochondrial fission (12-14). Mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) is a tail-anchored protein that resides within the outer mitochondrial membrane and is part of the mitochondrial fission complex. MFF participates in mitochondrial fission by serving as one of multiple receptors for the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) (15-18). AMPK directly phosphorylates MFF at two sites to allow for enhanced recruitment of Drp1 to the mitochondria (19). 

The Senescence Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple markers of cellular senescence. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Senescence is characterized by stable stress-induced proliferative arrest and resistance to mitogenic stimuli, as well as the secretion of proteins such as cytokines, growth factors and proteases. These secreted proteins comprise the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescent cells are thought to accumulate as an organism ages, and contribute to age-related diseases, including cancer, through promotion of inflammation and disruption of normal cellular function (1,2).Because there is no single biomarker that can be used to definitively identify senescent cells, researchers must rely on a collection of biomarkers commonly associated with senescence. The Senescence Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides a collection of antibodies to commonly used biomarkers of senescence-associated cell cycle arrest (p16 INK4A, p21 Waf1/Cip1), senescence-associated DNA damage (gamma-Histone H2A.X), and the SASP (HMGB1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, MMP3). The kit also includes an antibody to Lamin B1, which is frequently reduced in senescent cells.

The Nuclear Receptor Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the presence and status of nuclear receptors. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Huntingtin Interaction Antibody Sampler kit provides an economical means of detecting transcription-related proteins that interact with Huntingtin (Htt). This kit contains enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.