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Antibody Sampler Kit Response to Uv

The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase Complex Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to study multiple protein components of ubiquitin E3 ligase complexes. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The Stress and Apoptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating stress and apoptotic responses of each protein. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The Pro-Apoptosis Bcl-2 Family Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means to examine several members of the Bcl-2 family. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

The NF-κB Pathway Sampler Kit contains reagents to examine the activation state and total protein levels of key proteins in the NF-κB pathway: IKKα, IKKβ, NF-κB p65/RelA and IκBα. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.

Background: The transcriptional nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state, complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins. Activation occurs via phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32 and Ser36, resulting in the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome-dependent degradation of IκBα and the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB dimers. The regulation of IκBβ and IκBε is similar to that of IκBα, however, the phosphorylation and degradation of these proteins occurs with much slower kinetics. Phosphorylation of IκBβ occurs at Ser/Thr19 and Ser23, while IκBε can be phosphorylated at Ser18 and Ser22. The key regulatory step in this pathway involves activation of a high molecular weight IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex, consisting of three tightly associated IKK subunits. IKKα and IKKβ serve as the catalytic subunits of the kinase. Activation of IKK depends on phosphorylation at Ser177 and Ser181 in the activation loop of IKKβ (176 and 180 in IKKα). NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), and its homolog IKKε (IKKi), phosphorylate and activate IKKα and IKKβ.

The AMPK Subunit Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the role played by all AMPK subunits in cellular energy homeostasis. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots with each antibody.

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

The Phospho-MAPK Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating the phosphorylation state of p38, p44/42, and SAPK/JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2), SAPK/JNK, and p38 MAPK function in protein kinase cascades that play a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and control of cellular responses to cytokines and stress. p44/42 MAPK is activated by growth and neurotrophic factors. Activation occurs through phosphorylation of threonine and tyrosine residues (Thr202 and Tyr204 in human Erk1) at the sequence T*EY* by a single upstream MAP kinase kinase (MEK). SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK are activated by inflammatory cytokines and by a wide variety of cellular stresses. Activation of SAPK/JNK occurs via phosphorylation at Thr183 and Tyr185 by the dual specificity enzyme SEK/MKK4. Both MKK3 and SEK phosphorylate p38 MAPK on tyrosine and threonine at the sequence T*GY* to activate p38 MAP kinase (1-5).

The Phospho-SAPK/JNK Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating multiple members of the SAPK/JNK pathway as well as their activation state. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: The stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-amino-terminal kinase SAPK/JNK is potently and preferentially activated by a variety of environmental stresses including UV and gamma radiation, ceramides, inflammatory cytokines, and in some instances, growth factors and GPCR agonists (1-6). As with the other MAPKs, the core signaling unit is composed of a MAPKKK, typically MEKK1-MEKK4, or by one of the mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), which phosphorylate and activate MKK4/7. Upon activation, MKKs phosphorylate and activate the SAPK/JNK kinase (2). Stress signals are delivered to this cascade by small GTPases of the Rho family (Rac, Rho, cdc42) (3). Both Rac1 and cdc42 mediate the stimulation of MEKKs and MLKs (3). Alternatively, MKK4/7 can be activated in a GTPase-independent mechanism via stimulation of a germinal center kinase (GCK) family member (4). There are three SAPK/JNK genes each of which undergoes alternative splicing, resulting in numerous isoforms (3). SAPK/JNK, when active as a dimer, can translocate to the nucleus and regulate transcription through its effects on c-Jun, ATF-2, and other transcription factors (3,5).

The MAPK Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of p38, p44/42, and SAPK/JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2), SAPK/JNK, and p38 MAPK function in protein kinase cascades that play a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and control of cellular responses to cytokines and stress. p44/42 MAPK is activated by growth and neurotrophic factors. Activation occurs through phosphorylation of threonine and tyrosine residues (Thr202 and Tyr204 in human Erk1) at the sequence T*EY* by a single upstream MAP kinase kinase (MEK). SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK are activated by inflammatory cytokines and by a wide variety of cellular stresses. Activation of SAPK/JNK occurs via phosphorylation at Thr183 and Tyr185 by the dual specificity enzyme SEK/MKK4. Both MKK3 and SEK phosphorylate p38 MAPK on tyrosine and threonine at the sequence T*GY* to activate p38 MAP kinase (1-5).

The Cleaved Caspase Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of caspases by detecting their cleaved forms. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Apoptosis is a regulated physiological process leading to cell death. Caspases, a family of cysteine acid proteases, are central regulators of apoptosis. Initiator caspases (including 8, 9, 10 and 12) are closely coupled to proapoptotic signals. Once activated, these caspases cleave and activate downstream effector caspases (including 3, 6 and 7), which in turn cleave cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins like PARP, α-fodrin, DFF and lamin A, and induce apoptosis. Cytochrome c released from mitochondria is coupled to the activation of caspase-9, a key initiator caspase (1). Proapoptotic stimuli include the FasL, TNF-α, DNA damage and ER stress. Fas and TNFR activate caspases 8 and 10 (2), DNA damage leads to the activation of caspase-9 and ER stress leads to the calcium-mediated activation of caspase-12 (3). The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family includes XIAP and survivin and functions by binding and inhibiting several caspases (4,5). Smac/Diablo, a mitochondrial protein, is released into the cytosol upon mitochondrial stress and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs. The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effects of the IAPs on caspases (6).

The Pro-Apoptosis Bcl-2 Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several members of the Bcl-2 family and their activation status. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

The SET1/COMPASS Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting SET1/COMPASS proteins using control antibodies against SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, WDR5, WDR82, and Menin. This kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 on lysine 4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, mammals contain six Set1-related proteins: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3 and MLL4, all of which methylate histone H3 on lysine 4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common core structural subunits WDR5, RBBP5 and ASH2L (2-6). WDR82 is a core subunit specific to SET1A and SET1B complexes, while Menin is a core subunit specific to the MLL complexes (4,5,7).Like yeast Set1, all six Set1-related mammalian proteins methylate histone H3 on lysine 4 (2-6). SET1A, SET1B, MLL1 and MLL2 mediate di- and tri-methylation of histone H3 Lys4 at gene promoters to facilitate transcription activation. MLL3 and MLL4 function primarily to mono-methylate histone H3 Lys4 at gene enhancers. MLL1 and MLL2 function as master regulators of both embryogenesis and hematopoiesis, and are required for proper expression of Hox genes (8-10). MLL1 is a large approximately 4000 amino acid protein that is cleaved by the Taspase 1 threonine endopeptidase to form N-terminal (MLL1-N) and C-terminal MLL1 (MLL1-C) fragments, both of which are subunits of the functional MLL1/COMPASS complex (11,12). MLL1 translocations are found in a large number of hematological malignancies, suggesting that Set1 histone methyltransferase complexes play a critical role in leukemogenesis (6). Like MLL1, MLL2 is also a large, approximately 2700 amino acid protein that is cleaved by the Taspase 1 threonine endopeptidase to form N-terminal (MLL2-N) and C-terminal (MLL2-C) fragments, both of which are subunits of the functional MLL2/COMPASS complex. MLL2 has also been implicated as a modulator of hematological malignancies (13). MLL3 and MLL4 proteins are not cleaved by Taspase 1.

The Fanconi Anemia Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting members of the Fanconi Anemia signaling pathway. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in symptoms that include chromosomal breakage, bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C), and a predisposition to cancer (1). In response to DNA damage, the FA nuclear complex (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCM) induces mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI (2).Monoubiquitination of FANCD2 induces localization of FANCD2 to sites of DNA damage, where it interacts with BRCA1 (4). FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCD1/BRCA2, and FANCN/PALB2 are also recruited to sites of DNA damage. FA signaling is important in maintenance of chromosome stability and control of mitosis (3).

This kit contains reagents to examine total protein levels of the five NF-κB/Rel family members: p65/RelA, RelB, c-Rel, NF-κB1 (p105/p50) and NF-κB2 (p100/p52).

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

The NF-κB p65 Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to examine NF-κB p65/RelA phosphorylation at Ser468 and Ser536; acetylation at Lys310; and total p65 levels.

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

The ULK1 Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical way to investigate ULK1 signaling. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.

Background: Two related serine/threonine kinases, UNC-51-like kinase 1 and 2 (ULK1, ULK2), were discovered as mammalian homologs of the C. elegans gene UNC-51 in which mutants exhibited abnormal axonal extension and growth (1-4). Both proteins are widely expressed and contain an amino-terminal kinase domain followed by a central proline/serine rich domain and a highly conserved carboxy-terminal domain. The roles of ULK1 and ULK2 in axon growth have been linked to studies showing that the kinases are localized to neuronal growth cones and are involved in endocytosis of critical growth factors, such as NGF (5). Yeast two-hybrid studies found ULK1/2 associated with modulators of the endocytic pathway, SynGAP and syntenin (6). Structural similarity of ULK1/2 has also been recognized with the yeast autophagy protein Atg1/Apg1 (7). Knockdown experiments using siRNA demonstrated that ULK1 is essential for autophagy (8), a catabolic process for the degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (9,10). It appears that Atg1/ULK1 can act as a convergence point for multiple signals that control autophagy (11), and can bind to several autophagy-related (Atg) proteins, regulating phosphorylation states and protein trafficking (12-16).

The Initiator Caspases Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating initiator (apical) caspase proteins. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.
The Procaspase Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the abundance and activation of caspases. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform at least two western blots per primary antibody.
The ER Stress-induced Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to investigate ER stress-induced signaling within the cell. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform four western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The Apoptosis/Necroptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting markers for apoptosis and necroptosis. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Apoptosis is a regulated physiological process leading to cell death (1,2). Caspases, a family of cysteine acid proteases, are central regulators of apoptosis. Caspases are synthesized as inactive zymogens containing a pro-domain followed by large (p20) and small subunits (p10) that are proteolytically processed in a cascade of caspase activity. Initiator caspases (including 8, 9, 10, and 12) are closely coupled to proapoptotic signals. Once activated, these caspases cleave and activate downstream effector caspases (including 3, 6, and 7), which in turn cleave cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins like PARP, α-fodrin, DFF, and lamin A, and induce apoptosis. Cytochrome c released from mitochondria is coupled to the activation of caspase-9, a key initiator caspase. Apoptosis induced through the extrinsic mechanisms involving death receptors in the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily activates caspase-8. Activated caspase-8 cleaves and activates downstream effector caspases, such as caspase-1, -3, -6, and -7. Caspase-3 is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP).Necroptosis, a regulated pathway for necrotic cell death, is triggered by a number of inflammatory signals, including cytokines in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, pathogen sensors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and ischemic injury (3,4). Necroptosis is negatively regulated by caspase-8 mediated apoptosis in which the kinase RIP/RIPK1 is cleaved (5). Furthermore, necroptosis is inhibited by a small molecule inhibitor of RIP, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) (6). Research studies show that necroptosis contributes to a number of pathological conditions, and Nec-1 has been shown to provide neuroprotection in models such as ischemic brain injury (7). RIP is phosphorylated at several sites within the kinase domain that are sensitive to Nec-1, including Ser14, Ser15, Ser161, and Ser166 (8). Phosphorylation drives association with RIP3, which is required for necroptosis (9-11). Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a pseudokinase that was identified as downstream target of RIP3 in the necroptosis pathway (12). During necroptosis RIP3 is phosphorylated at Ser227, which recruits MLKL and leads to its phosphorylation at Thr357 and Ser358 (12). Knockdown of MLKL through multiple mechanisms results in inhibition of necroptosis (13). While the precise mechanism for MLKL-induced necroptosis is unclear, some studies have shown that necroptosis leads to oligomerization of MLKL and translocation to the plasma membrane, where it effects membrane integrity (14-17).

The AMPK Substrate Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting total and phosphorylated substrates of AMPK. The kit provides enough antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5).AMPK phosphorylates a number of targets controlling cellular processes such as metabolism, cell growth, and autophagy (6). It suppresses the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), that plays a key role in promoting cell growth. The regulatory associated protein of mTOR (Raptor) was identified as an mTOR binding partner that mediates mTOR signaling to downstream targets (7,8). Raptor binds to mTOR substrates, including 4E-BP1 and p70 S6 kinase, through their TOR signaling (TOS) motifs and is required for mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of these substrates (9,10). AMPK directly phosphorylates Raptor at Ser722/Ser792, and this phosphorylation is essential for inhibition of the raptor-containing mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and induces cell cycle arrest when cells are stressed for energy (11). AMPK also promotes autophagy by directly phosphorylating ULK1 (11,12). ULK1 is a Ser/Thr kinase required for the Initiation and formation of the autophagosome. AMPK, activated during low nutrient conditions, directly phosphorylates ULK1 at multiple sites including Ser317, Ser555, and Ser777 (11,12). Conversely, mTOR, which is a regulator of cell growth and an inhibitor of autophagy, phosphorylates ULK1 at Ser757 and disrupts the interaction between ULK1 and AMPK (11). AMPK can also directly phosphorylate Beclin-1, a component of the complex downstream of ULK1 in autophagosome formation that activates the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase VPS34. AMPK phosphorylates Beclin-1 at Ser93 and Ser96 residues in human, which correspond to murine Ser91 and Ser94 (14).