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Blocking Peptide Response to Organic Substance

This peptide is used to block Phospho-CREB (Ser133) Antibody #9191, Phospho-CREB (Ser133) (87G3) Rabbit mAb #9198 and Phospho-CREB (Ser133) (1B6) Mouse mAb #9196 reactivity.

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

This peptide is used to block PP2A A Subunit (81G5) Rabbit mAb #2041 reactivity in dot blots or Western immunoblotting.

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

This peptide is used to block NF-κB p65 (C22B4) Rabbit mAb #4764 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

This peptide is used to block PP2A C Subunit (52F8) Rabbit mAb #2259 and PP2A C Subunit Antibody #2038 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

This peptide is used to block NEDD8 (19E3) Rabbit mAb #2754 reactivity.

Background: Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated protein 8 (NEDD8), also known as Rub1 (related to ubiquitin 1) in plants and yeast, is a member of the ubiquitin-like protein family (1,2). The covalent attachment of NEDD8 to target proteins, termed neddylation, is a reversible, multi-step process analogous to ubiquitination. NEDD8 is first synthesized in a precursor form with a carboxy-terminal extension peptide that is removed by either the UCH-L3 or NEDP1/DEN1 hydrolase protein to yield a mature NEDD8 protein (3,4). Mature NEDD8 is then covalently linked to target proteins via the carboxy-terminal glycine residue in a reaction catalyzed by the APP-BP1/Uba3 heterodimer complex and Ubc12 as the E1- and E2-like enzymes, respectively (5). An E3 ligase protein, Roc1/Rbx1, is also required for neddylation of the cullin proteins (6). Protein de-neddylation is catalyzed by a number of enzymes in the cell, including a "ubiquitin-specific" protease USP21, the NEDP1/DEN1 hydrolase and the COP9/signalosome (CSN) (7,8,9). In contrast to the ubiquitin pathway, the NEDD8 modification system acts on only a few substrates and does not appear to target proteins for degradation. Neddylation of cullin proteins activates the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex by promoting complex formation and enhancing the recruitment of the E2-ubiquitin intermediate (10). While NEDD8 modification of VHL is not required for ubiquitination of HIF1-α, it is required for fibronectin matrix assembly (11). Mdm2-dependent neddylation of p53 inhibits its transcriptional activity (12).