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Human Adenosine to Inosine Editing

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Adenosine to Inosine Editing, Monoclonal Antibody Adenosine to Inosine Editing, Monkey Adenosine to Inosine Editing

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Post-transcriptional processing of RNAs such as RNA editing is an important mechanism by which diversity in RNA and protein is achieved that is not otherwise encoded by the genome (1,2). The most common form of RNA editing is the conversion of adenosine (A) into inosine (I) on double stranded RNA by the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins (1-3). Since inosine base pairs with cytidine, it is interpreted as a guanosine by the splicing and translational machinery leading to alteration in the protein sequence, as well as splicing isoforms being generated (1,4-6). A-to-I editing can also influence RNA sequence recognition by RNA binding proteins and non-coding RNA, such as miRNAs, affecting subsequent RNA processing, stability, and protein expression levels (2).ADAR1 is ubiquitously expressed with two known isoforms ADAR1L (p150) and ADAR1S (p110) resulting from transcription using alternative promoters and start codons. ADAR1S is constitutively expressed in the nucleus, while ADAR1L is interferon-inducible and present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The induction of ADAR1L in response to cellular stress and viral infection suggests a role for RNA editing in the innate immune response (1,7). In addition, ADAR1 is essential in mammalian development, particularly in hematopoiesis and suppression of interferon signaling to protect hematopoietic stem cells from destruction in the fetal liver and the adult bone marrow (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyltransferase-like protein 3 (METTL3) and methytransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14) are the two catalytic subunits of an N6-methyltransferase complex that methylates adenosine residues in RNA (1). Methylation of adenosine residues regulates mRNA splicing, processing, translation efficiency, editing and stability, in addition to regulating primary miRNA processing, and is critical for proper regulation of the circadian clock, embryonic stem cell self-renewal, immune tolerance, response to various stimuli, meiosis and mouse fertility (2,3). In this complex, METTL3 functions as the catalytic methyltransferase subunit and METTL14 functions as the target recognition subunit by binding to RNA (4). In addition, the Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) functions as a regulatory subunit and is required for accumulation of the complex to nuclear speckles, which are sites of RNA processing (5). Several studies suggest a role for this complex in cancer. METTL3 expression is elevated in lung adenocarcinoma where it promotes growth, survival and invasion of human lung cancer cells (6). In addition, WTAP is over-expressed in a number of different cancers and positively regulates cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyltransferase-like protein 3 (METTL3) and methytransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14) are the two catalytic subunits of an N6-methyltransferase complex that methylates adenosine residues in RNA (1). Methylation of adenosine residues regulates mRNA splicing, processing, translation efficiency, editing and stability, in addition to regulating primary miRNA processing, and is critical for proper regulation of the circadian clock, embryonic stem cell self-renewal, immune tolerance, response to various stimuli, meiosis and mouse fertility (2,3). In this complex, METTL3 functions as the catalytic methyltransferase subunit and METTL14 functions as the target recognition subunit by binding to RNA (4). In addition, the Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) functions as a regulatory subunit and is required for accumulation of the complex to nuclear speckles, which are sites of RNA processing (5). Several studies suggest a role for this complex in cancer. METTL3 expression is elevated in lung adenocarcinoma where it promotes growth, survival and invasion of human lung cancer cells (6). In addition, WTAP is over-expressed in a number of different cancers and positively regulates cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma (7,8).