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Human Calcium-Dependent Protein Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Annexin A7/ANXA7 is a member of the annexin family of calcium/phospholipid-binding proteins, and is involved in the process of membrane fusion and exocytosis (1). Annexin A7 is a GTPase, and both GTP-binding and PKC activity are important in regulating protein function (2,3). Membrane binding of annexin A7 is calcium dependent (4). Two isoforms exist due to alternative splicing. Subcellular localization of annexin A7 has been shown to be in the cytoplasm, vesicular structures, membrane and in adrenal chromaffin granules (5,6). Nuclear localization has been shown in the developing mouse central nervous system as well as in adult mouse brain (7). Annexin A7-deficient mouse studies show that the protein has a role in insulin secretion and calcium signaling (8) as well as cardiac intracellular calcium homeostasis electrical stability (9). The gene for annexin A7 is a putative tumor suppressor (10), and alterations in the copy number have been reported in prostate cancer (11). Annexin A7 expression has also been correlated with survival in human glioblastoma patients (12), and haploinsufficiency in mice may promote genetic instability leading to tumorigenesis (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MMP-13 (collagenase 3) belongs to the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) superfamily of enzymes that targets many extracellular proteins, including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1, 2). MMP-13 is a member of a subgroup of collagenases (including MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-18) that play an even more important function targeting fibrillar collagen. MMP-13 is synthesized as a latent proenzyme, and proteolytic removal of the inhibitory propeptide domain is required for enzyme activation. MMP-13 protein levels are regulated at the transcriptional level, via specific transcription factors and via promoter DNA methylation (3, 4). MMP-13 preferentially cleaves Type II collagen, and research studies have shown that aberrant upregulation of MMP-13 activity can lead to cartilage loss and osteoarthritis (5, 6). In addition, MMP-13 has been shown to promote cancer development, in part through enhancing tumor angiogenesis and metastases (7-9), suggesting that collagenase activity may serve as a useful marker of tumor progression (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is an integral membrane protein found in synaptic vesicles thought to play a role in vesicle trafficking and exocytosis (1). Individual SYT1 proteins are composed of an amino-terminal transmembrane region, a central linker region and a pair of carboxy-terminal C2 domains responsible for binding Ca2+ (2). The C2 domains appear to be functionally distinct, with the C2A domain responsible for regulating synaptic vesicle fusion in a calcium-dependent manner during exocytosis while the C2B domain allows for interaction between adjacent SYT1 proteins (3). Because synaptotagmin 1 binds calcium and is found in synaptic vesicles, this integral membrane protein is thought to act as a calcium sensor in fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Evidence suggests possible roles in vesicle-mediated endocytosis and glucose-induced insulin secretion as well (4,5). SYT1 binds several different SNARE proteins during calcium-mediated vesicle endocytosis and an association between SYT1 and the SNARE protein SNAP-25 is thought to be a key element in vesicle-mediated exocytosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is an integral membrane protein found in synaptic vesicles thought to play a role in vesicle trafficking and exocytosis (1). Individual SYT1 proteins are composed of an amino-terminal transmembrane region, a central linker region and a pair of carboxy-terminal C2 domains responsible for binding Ca2+ (2). The C2 domains appear to be functionally distinct, with the C2A domain responsible for regulating synaptic vesicle fusion in a calcium-dependent manner during exocytosis while the C2B domain allows for interaction between adjacent SYT1 proteins (3). Because synaptotagmin 1 binds calcium and is found in synaptic vesicles, this integral membrane protein is thought to act as a calcium sensor in fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Evidence suggests possible roles in vesicle-mediated endocytosis and glucose-induced insulin secretion as well (4,5). SYT1 binds several different SNARE proteins during calcium-mediated vesicle endocytosis and an association between SYT1 and the SNARE protein SNAP-25 is thought to be a key element in vesicle-mediated exocytosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MMP-13 (collagenase 3) belongs to the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) superfamily of enzymes that targets many extracellular proteins, including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1, 2). MMP-13 is a member of a subgroup of collagenases (including MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-18) that play an even more important function targeting fibrillar collagen. MMP-13 is synthesized as a latent proenzyme, and proteolytic removal of the inhibitory propeptide domain is required for enzyme activation. MMP-13 protein levels are regulated at the transcriptional level, via specific transcription factors and via promoter DNA methylation (3, 4). MMP-13 preferentially cleaves Type II collagen, and research studies have shown that aberrant upregulation of MMP-13 activity can lead to cartilage loss and osteoarthritis (5, 6). In addition, MMP-13 has been shown to promote cancer development, in part through enhancing tumor angiogenesis and metastases (7-9), suggesting that collagenase activity may serve as a useful marker of tumor progression (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The coat protein complex II (COPII) is composed of five cytosolic proteins and includes the Sec23/24 complex, the Sec13/31 complex, and Sar1. The COPII coat is located at the ER/Golgi interface and is involved in transport of newly synthesized proteins from the ER to the Golgi apparatus (1). COPII formation is initiated through the binding of the activated G protein, Sar1, to the Sec23/24 complex to form a pre-budding complex that directly binds target molecules (1-3). This pre-budding complex further recruits Sec13/31 to form mature COPII coat (4,5). The Sec31 subunit of COPII coat interacts with Sec13 at the ER exit and is required for both vesicle formation and ER-Golgi transport. Two isoforms of human Sec31 have been identified, Sec31A and Sec31B, which share a sequence homology of 47.3% (6-8). Sec31A is ubiquitously expressed in tissues and organs, whereas Sec31B is enriched in brain and testis (7,8). In classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a novel fusion of Jak2 with Sec31A renders Jak2 constitutively active and subject to Jak2 inhibitor effects (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The coat protein complex II (COPII) is composed of five cytosolic proteins and includes the Sec23/24 complex, the Sec13/31 complex, and Sar1. The COPII coat is located at the ER/Golgi interface and is involved in transport of newly synthesized proteins from the ER to the Golgi apparatus (1). COPII formation is initiated through the binding of the activated G protein, Sar1, to the Sec23/24 complex to form a pre-budding complex that directly binds target molecules (1-3). This pre-budding complex further recruits Sec13/31 to form mature COPII coat (4,5). The Sec31 subunit of COPII coat interacts with Sec13 at the ER exit and is required for both vesicle formation and ER-Golgi transport. Two isoforms of human Sec31 have been identified, Sec31A and Sec31B, which share a sequence homology of 47.3% (6-8). Sec31A is ubiquitously expressed in tissues and organs, whereas Sec31B is enriched in brain and testis (7,8). In classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a novel fusion of Jak2 with Sec31A renders Jak2 constitutively active and subject to Jak2 inhibitor effects (9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Annexin A1 (D5V2T) XP® Rabbit mAb #32934.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® S100A4 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit S100A4 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP25) is a target membrane soluble, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) that is found on neuronal presynaptic membranes. SNAP25 forms a core complex with the SNARE proteins syntaxin and synaptobrevin to mediate synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during Ca2+-dependent exocytosis (1). This complex is responsible for exocytosis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by proteolysis of SNAP25 by botulinum toxins A and E (2). SNAP25 plays a secondary role as a Q-SNARE involved in endosome fusion; the protein is associated with genetic susceptibility to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Annexin A2 (ANXA2), also known as lipocortin II or calpactin-1 heavy chain, is a 36 kDa member of the annexin superfamily that binds phospholipids and other proteins in a calcium-dependent manner via annexin repeats (1). Annexin A2 contains four such repeats through which it mediates protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions (1-4). It forms a constitutive heterotetramer with S100A10, acting as a bridge between the actin cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and endocytotic vesicle machinery (5-7). Originally identified as a protein inhibitor of phospholipase A2, annexin A2 has subsequently been shown to interact with an array of protein and non-protein partners, including F-actin, spectrin, SNARE complexes, RNA, and virus particles (4,6,8,9). Annexin A2 has also been shown to have receptor-like activity and is detected on the surface of macrophages and vascular endothelial cells where it mediates macrophage activation and Factor Xa signaling, respectively (10-13). Upregulation of annexin A2 at the cell surface is thought to be modulated by phosphorylation at Tyr23 by Src (14-18). Interestingly, phosphorylation at Tyr23 has recently been shown to be required for cell surface expression of annexin A2 where it mediates motility, invasiveness, and overall metastatic potential of certain pancreatic cancer cells (19,20). Annexin A2 has also been shown to be heavily phosphorylated on serine residues in response to PKC activation via a pleiotropic mechanism (21-23). For a complete list of curated phosphorylation sites on annexin A2, please see PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).