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Human Dendritic Cell Chemotaxis

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CCR2 is a member of the “CC-branch” of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors that regulate monocyte chemotaxis and T cell migration/activation and drive inflammation in a number of pathological conditions (1). CCR2 is the receptor for several chemokines including MCP-1, MCP-3, and MCP-4 (2-5). CCR2 transduces signals through increases in intracellular calcium levels. It has two alternative isoforms, CCR2A and CCR2B, differing in their carboxy-terminal tails with CCR2B trafficking more efficiently to the membrane (2,6). CCR2 was originally identified in the THP-1 monocyte cell line, and its expression is decreased following differentiation into macrophages (7). Knockout studies demonstrate that CCR2 is a major regulator of macrophage trafficking (8-10). In addition, research studies have shown that CCR2 functions as an alternative coreceptor with CD4 for infection of some strains of HIV (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RANTES/CCL5 (regulated upon activation, T cell expressed and secreted) is a member of the "C-C" or β family of chemokines that induce inflammation and are associated with a number of inflammatory disorders (1,2). RANTES is produced and secreted mainly by CD8+ T cells, macrophages, and platelets, as well as epithelial cells, fibroblasts and some solid tumors (2-7). RANTES acts as a chemoattractant and has other regulatory functions on a number of cell types including monocytes, memory T cells, NK cells, eosinophils, basophils, dendritic cells, and mast cells (3, 7-9). Signaling by RANTES is mediated by several G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), including CCR1, CCR3, CCR4 and CCR5.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated HMGB1 (D3E5) Rabbit mAb #6893.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RANTES/CCL5 (regulated upon activation, T cell expressed and secreted) is a member of the "C-C" or β family of chemokines that induce inflammation and are associated with a number of inflammatory disorders (1,2). RANTES is produced and secreted mainly by CD8+ T cells, macrophages, and platelets, as well as epithelial cells, fibroblasts and some solid tumors (2-7). RANTES acts as a chemoattractant and has other regulatory functions on a number of cell types including monocytes, memory T cells, NK cells, eosinophils, basophils, dendritic cells, and mast cells (3, 7-9). Signaling by RANTES is mediated by several G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), including CCR1, CCR3, CCR4 and CCR5.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate by phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Growth factors and hormones trigger this phosphorylation event, which in turn coordinates cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell migration, and cell survival (1). PTEN reverses this process, and research studies have shown that the PI3K signaling pathway is constitutively activated in human cancers that have loss of function of PTEN (2). PI3Ks are composed of a catalytic subunit (p110) and a regulatory subunit. Various isoforms of the catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, p110γ, and p110δ) have been isolated, and the regulatory subunits that associate with p110α, p110β, and p110δ are p85α and p85β (3). In contrast, p110γ associates with a p101 regulatory subunit that is unrelated to p85. Furthermore, p110γ is activated by βγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family. It is activated by a small cytokine, CXCL12, also known as stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1) (1). The main function of CXCR4 is the mediation of the homing of progenitor cells in the bone marrow and their recruitment to sites of injury (2). More recently, CXCR4 has been studied, as a potential therapeutic target, in the context of autoimmune diseases (3) as well as cancer, as the receptor is involved in the regulation of migration, proliferation, and survival of cancer cells (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate by phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Growth factors and hormones trigger this phosphorylation event, which in turn coordinates cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell migration, and cell survival (1). PTEN reverses this process, and research studies have shown that the PI3K signaling pathway is constitutively activated in human cancers that have loss of function of PTEN (2). PI3Ks are composed of a catalytic subunit (p110) and a regulatory subunit. Various isoforms of the catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, p110γ, and p110δ) have been isolated, and the regulatory subunits that associate with p110α, p110β, and p110δ are p85α and p85β (3). In contrast, p110γ associates with a p101 regulatory subunit that is unrelated to p85. Furthermore, p110γ is activated by βγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family. It is activated by a small cytokine, CXCL12, also known as stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1) (1). The main function of CXCR4 is the mediation of the homing of progenitor cells in the bone marrow and their recruitment to sites of injury (2). More recently, CXCR4 has been studied, as a potential therapeutic target, in the context of autoimmune diseases (3) as well as cancer, as the receptor is involved in the regulation of migration, proliferation, and survival of cancer cells (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family. It is activated by a small cytokine, CXCL12, also known as stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1) (1). The main function of CXCR4 is the mediation of the homing of progenitor cells in the bone marrow and their recruitment to sites of injury (2). More recently, CXCR4 has been studied, as a potential therapeutic target, in the context of autoimmune diseases (3) as well as cancer, as the receptor is involved in the regulation of migration, proliferation, and survival of cancer cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is produced by T cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1,2). IL-10 initiates signal transduction by binding to a cell surface receptor complex consisting of IL-10 RI and IL-10 RII (1), leading to the activation of Jak1 and Tyk2 and phosphorylation of Stat3 (1,3). The anti-inflammatory activity of IL-10 is due to its ability to block signaling through other cytokine receptors, notably IFN-γ receptor, by upregulating expression of SOCS1 (1,3). In addition, IL-10 promotes T cell tolerance by inhibiting tyrosine phosphorylation of CD28 (4,5). IL-10 is an important negative regulator of the immune response, which allows for maintenance of pregnancy (1). In contrast, increased IL-10 levels contribute to persistent Leishmania major infections (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The adhesive glycoprotein thrombospondin-1 (THBS1, TSP1) localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and mediates interactions between cells and the ECM and among cells. Thrombospondin-1 is a multi-domain, glycosylated protein that interacts with a wide variety of extracellular targets, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), collagens, cell receptors, growth factors, and cytokines (1). The protein structure of THBS1 includes an amino-terminal laminin G-like domain, a von Willebrand factor-binding domain, and multiple thrombospondin (TSP) repeated sequences designated as type I, type II, or type III repeats. Each thrombospondin domain interacts with a distinct type of cell surface ligands or protein targets. The amino-terminal domain interacts with aggrecan, heparin, and integrin proteins. Type I TSP repeats interact with MMPs and CD36, while carboxy-terminal repeats bind the thrombospondin receptor CD47 (1). Through these interactions, THBS1 exerts diverse effects on different signaling pathways, such as VEGF receptor/NO signaling, TGFβ signaling, and the NF-κB pathway (2-5). Thrombospondin-1 is an important regulator of many biological processes, including cell adhesion/migration, apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, vascular function, and cancer development (2-5). The activity of thrombospondin-1 is mainly regulated by extracellular proteases. The metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 cleaves thrombospondin, resulting in the release of peptides with anti-angiogenic properties. Elastase and plasmin proteases degrade the THBS1 protein and down regulate its activity (6). As THBS1 is an important protein inhibitor of angiogenesis, the development of thrombospondin-based compounds and their use in therapeutic studies may provide a beneficial approach to the treatment of cancer (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor ® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).

$469
Reagents for 4 x 96 well plates
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Phospho-c-Kit (Tyr719) Sandwich ELISA Antibody Pair is offered as an economical alternative to our PathScan® Phospho-c-Kit (Tyr719) Sandwich ELISA Kit #7298. Capture and Detection Antibodies (100X stocks) and HRP-Conjugated Secondary Antibody (1000X stock) are supplied. Sufficient reagents are supplied for 4 x 96 well ELISAs. The c-Kit Mouse Capture Antibody is coated in PBS overnight in a 96 well microplate. After blocking, cell lysates are added followed by Phospho-c-Kit (Tyr719) Rabbit Detection Antibody and Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody. HRP substrate (TMB) is added for color development. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of phospho-c-Kit (Tyr719) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).