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Human Dna-Dependent Atpase Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RBAP46 and RBAP48; also known as RBBP7 and RBBP4) were first characterized in human cells as proteins that bind to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (1). Since then, these proteins have been shown to be components of many protein complexes involved in chromatin regulation, including the chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) complex and type B histone acetyltransferase complex HAT1, both of which function in chromatin assembly during DNA replication (2,3). RBAP46 and RBAP48 are also found in the nucleosome remodeling factor complex NURF, the nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation complex NuRD, and the Sin3/HDAC histone de-acetylation complex (4-7). More recently, RBAP46 and RBAP48 were identified as components of the polycomb repressor complex PRC2, which also contains EED and Ezh2 (8). RBAP46 and RBAP48 bind to the histone fold region of histone H4 and are believed to target these chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone de-acetylation complexes to their histone substrates (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: XPB and XPD are ATPase/helicase subunits of the TFIIH complex that are involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) to remove lesions and photoproducts generated by UV light (1). XPB and XPD are 3’-5’ and 5’-3’ DNA helicases, respectively, that play a role in opening of the DNA damage site to facilitate repair (2,3). XPB and XPD both play an important role in maintaining genomic stability, and researchers have linked mutations of these proteins to Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Trichothiodystrophy (TTD). XP patients have abnormalities in skin pigmentation and are highly susceptible to skin cancers, while TTD patients exhibit symptoms such as brittle hair, neurological abnormalities, and mild photosensitivity (4). In addition to their role in NER, XPB and XPD are involved in transcription initiation as part of the TFIIH core complex (5). The helicase activity of XPB unwinds DNA around the transcription start site to facilitate RNA polymerase II promoter clearance and initiation of transcription (6). XPD plays a structural role linking core TFIIH components with the cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex that phosphorylates the C-terminus of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, leading to transcription initiation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RBAP46 and RBAP48; also known as RBBP7 and RBBP4) were first characterized in human cells as proteins that bind to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (1). Since then, these proteins have been shown to be components of many protein complexes involved in chromatin regulation, including the chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) complex and type B histone acetyltransferase complex HAT1, both of which function in chromatin assembly during DNA replication (2,3). RBAP46 and RBAP48 are also found in the nucleosome remodeling factor complex NURF, the nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation complex NuRD, and the Sin3/HDAC histone de-acetylation complex (4-7). More recently, RBAP46 and RBAP48 were identified as components of the polycomb repressor complex PRC2, which also contains EED and Ezh2 (8). RBAP46 and RBAP48 bind to the histone fold region of histone H4 and are believed to target these chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone de-acetylation complexes to their histone substrates (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CHD8 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by utilizing the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to alter chromatin architecture (1,2). The nine CHD family members are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). In addition, CHD8 contains three CR (conserved region) domains, a SANT (switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB)-like domain, two BRK (brahma and kismet) domains, and a DNA-binding domain (2). The chromatin remodeling activity of CHD8 has been shown to be important for the regulation of a wide variety of genes, such as the HOX genes (5) and genes that are driven by β-catenin (6), p53 (7), estrogen receptor (8), or androgen receptor (9). CHD8 can also interact with the insulator binding protein CTCF and is required for CTCF insulator activity at multiple gene loci (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage, if not repaired, can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic cells use multiple (sometimes overlapping) signaling pathways to respond to agents that cause various types of DNA lesions. Downstream molecules in DNA repair pathways converge on the sites of DNA damage, resulting in cell cycle arrest and repair or apoptosis (1). Rad18 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruited to sites of DNA damage. Along with the E2 ubiquitin ligase Rad6, Rad18 is responsible for monoubiquitination of DNA damage proteins including the replication clamp PCNA and the Fanconi anemia core protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitination of these proteins signals to downstream effector molecules and results in the repair of either post-replication repair lesions via the translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway or DNA double strand breaks via homologous recombination (2-4). Phospho-proteomic studies indicate that Ser403 of Rad18 may be phosphorylated by ATM/ATR in response to DNA damage-inducing agents (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage, if not repaired, can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic cells use multiple (sometimes overlapping) signaling pathways to respond to agents that cause various types of DNA lesions. Downstream molecules in DNA repair pathways converge on the sites of DNA damage, resulting in cell cycle arrest and repair or apoptosis (1). Rad18 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruited to sites of DNA damage. Along with the E2 ubiquitin ligase Rad6, Rad18 is responsible for monoubiquitination of DNA damage proteins including the replication clamp PCNA and the Fanconi anemia core protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitination of these proteins signals to downstream effector molecules and results in the repair of either post-replication repair lesions via the translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway or DNA double strand breaks via homologous recombination (2-4). Phospho-proteomic studies indicate that Ser403 of Rad18 may be phosphorylated by ATM/ATR in response to DNA damage-inducing agents (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHD8 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by utilizing the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to alter chromatin architecture (1,2). The nine CHD family members are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). In addition, CHD8 contains three CR (conserved region) domains, a SANT (switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB)-like domain, two BRK (brahma and kismet) domains, and a DNA-binding domain (2). The chromatin remodeling activity of CHD8 has been shown to be important for the regulation of a wide variety of genes, such as the HOX genes (5) and genes that are driven by β-catenin (6), p53 (7), estrogen receptor (8), or androgen receptor (9). CHD8 can also interact with the insulator binding protein CTCF and is required for CTCF insulator activity at multiple gene loci (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage, if not repaired, can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic cells use multiple (sometimes overlapping) signaling pathways to respond to agents that cause various types of DNA lesions. Downstream molecules in DNA repair pathways converge on the sites of DNA damage, resulting in cell cycle arrest and repair or apoptosis (1). Rad18 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruited to sites of DNA damage. Along with the E2 ubiquitin ligase Rad6, Rad18 is responsible for monoubiquitination of DNA damage proteins including the replication clamp PCNA and the Fanconi anemia core protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitination of these proteins signals to downstream effector molecules and results in the repair of either post-replication repair lesions via the translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway or DNA double strand breaks via homologous recombination (2-4). Phospho-proteomic studies indicate that Ser403 of Rad18 may be phosphorylated by ATM/ATR in response to DNA damage-inducing agents (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SMARCAL1 was first identified as a ubiquitously expressed member of the SNF2 family with homology to the E. coli protein HepA (1). Mutations in the gene encoding SMARCAL1 were subsequently shown to be the cause of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by phenotypes in multiple systems, including spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and impaired neurological function (2). Researchers have also associated SMARCAL1 deficiency with predisposition to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (3). The array of phenotypes associated with SMARCAL1 is likely due to its role as an annealing helicase in the DNA damage response. During DNA replication stress, SMARCAL1 is phosphorylated by DNA repair kinases (ATM, ATR, DNA-PK) (4). SMARCAL1 deficiency sensitizes cells to replication stress agents, and appears to increase the frequency of replication fork breakdown (4,5). SMARCAL1 is also required for efficient DNA double strand break repair via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway (6). Researchers have suggested that inhibitors targeting SMARCAL1 may be effective in sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents (reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of various nuclear processes, such as gene expression, DNA replication, and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits with a single molecule of the ATPase catalytic subunit BRM or BRG1, but not both. The activities of these two subunits drive the disruption of histone-DNA contacts that lead to changes in accessibility of crucial regulatory elements within chromatin (2-5). The BRM/BRG1 containing SWI/SNF complexes are recruited to target promoters by transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, RB, and BRCA1 to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9). BRM and BRG1 are also considered to be tumor suppressors and their expression levels are severely reduced in several cancer cell lines (10-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: XPB and XPD are ATPase/helicase subunits of the TFIIH complex that are involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) to remove lesions and photoproducts generated by UV light (1). XPB and XPD are 3’-5’ and 5’-3’ DNA helicases, respectively, that play a role in opening of the DNA damage site to facilitate repair (2,3). XPB and XPD both play an important role in maintaining genomic stability, and researchers have linked mutations of these proteins to Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Trichothiodystrophy (TTD). XP patients have abnormalities in skin pigmentation and are highly susceptible to skin cancers, while TTD patients exhibit symptoms such as brittle hair, neurological abnormalities, and mild photosensitivity (4). In addition to their role in NER, XPB and XPD are involved in transcription initiation as part of the TFIIH core complex (5). The helicase activity of XPB unwinds DNA around the transcription start site to facilitate RNA polymerase II promoter clearance and initiation of transcription (6). XPD plays a structural role linking core TFIIH components with the cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex that phosphorylates the C-terminus of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, leading to transcription initiation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H. The complex is involved in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating an activating residue in the T-loop domain of cdks (1). Regulation of CAK activity is mediated by T-loop phosphorylation and by association with MAT1, both of which enhance its kinase activity toward the CTD of RNA polymerase II (2,3) and other substrates such as p53 (4). CAK is an essential component of the transcription complex TFIIH and may interact directly with TFIIH helicases (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H. The complex is involved in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating an activating residue in the T-loop domain of cdks (1). Regulation of CAK activity is mediated by T-loop phosphorylation and by association with MAT1, both of which enhance its kinase activity toward the CTD of RNA polymerase II (2,3) and other substrates such as p53 (4). CAK is an essential component of the transcription complex TFIIH and may interact directly with TFIIH helicases (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin H belongs to a conserved cyclin family that plays a critical role in the regulation of cell cycle dependent kinases (CDKs) necessary for cell cycle progression (1,2). In general, the activity of CDKs requires the binding of appropriate cyclins as well as phosphorylation driven by Cdk-activating kinase (CAK). Cyclin H is part of the CAK complex that includes the kinase CDK7, and an assembly factor p36/Mat1, which enhances binding between cyclin H and CDK7 and increases activity (3,4). CAK regulates progression through the cell cycle by activating cdc2, CDK2, and CDK4 kinases through phosphorylation of a critical threonine residue in the T-loop of the CDK-cyclin complexes (5,6). The CAK complex can exist either in its free form or in association with transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) which can affect its substrate specificity (7,8,9). When bound to TFIIH, CAK preferentially phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (9), providing a link between cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation, and DNA repair.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).