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Human DNA Recombination

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mre11, originally described in genetic screens from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which mutants were defective in meiotic recombination (1), is a central part of a multisubunit nuclease composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 (MRN) (2,3). The MRN complex plays a critical role in sensing, processing and repairing DNA double strand breaks. Defects lead to genomic instability, telomere shortening, aberrant meiosis and hypersensitivity to DNA damage (4). Hypomorphic mutations of Mre11 are found in ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD), with phenotypes similar to mutations in ATM that cause ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), including a predisposition to malignancy in humans (5). Cellular consequences of ATLD include chromosomal instability and defects in the intra-S phase and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The MRN complex may directly activate the ATM checkpoint kinase at DNA breaks (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mre11, originally described in genetic screens from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which mutants were defective in meiotic recombination (1), is a central part of a multisubunit nuclease composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 (MRN) (2,3). The MRN complex plays a critical role in sensing, processing and repairing DNA double strand breaks. Defects lead to genomic instability, telomere shortening, aberrant meiosis and hypersensitivity to DNA damage (4). Hypomorphic mutations of Mre11 are found in ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD), with phenotypes similar to mutations in ATM that cause ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), including a predisposition to malignancy in humans (5). Cellular consequences of ATLD include chromosomal instability and defects in the intra-S phase and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The MRN complex may directly activate the ATM checkpoint kinase at DNA breaks (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mre11, originally described in genetic screens from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which mutants were defective in meiotic recombination (1), is a central part of a multisubunit nuclease composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 (MRN) (2,3). The MRN complex plays a critical role in sensing, processing and repairing DNA double strand breaks. Defects lead to genomic instability, telomere shortening, aberrant meiosis and hypersensitivity to DNA damage (4). Hypomorphic mutations of Mre11 are found in ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD), with phenotypes similar to mutations in ATM that cause ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), including a predisposition to malignancy in humans (5). Cellular consequences of ATLD include chromosomal instability and defects in the intra-S phase and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The MRN complex may directly activate the ATM checkpoint kinase at DNA breaks (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The sequences encoding antigen receptors are split into multiple germline segments which are then combined by a process called V(D)J recombination during immune cells development. A variable (V) segment is combined with a joining (J) segment, and in some cases a D (Diversity) segment, to create the antigen-binding portion of the receptor. The recombined V(D)J segment is then spliced into exons that encode the constant region to produce mature mRNA (1,2). This essential process required for the development of functional immune T and B cells creates a vast diversity in these receptors (3,4). Initiation of this process follows binding of RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1) and RAG2 to the conserved recombination signal sequences (RSS) and the introduction of a double-strand break between the RSS and the coding sequence (5,6). RAG1 and RAG2 genes are located immediately adjacent to each other in the genome and lack introns in their coding regions in many species. RAG1 and RAG2 are coexpressed only in the B and T cell lineages and both are required for cleavage activity (7). RAG1 and RAG2 can also function as transposases, contributing to chromosomal translocations and lymphoid malignancy (8,9). Mutations in the RAG genes are associated with a spectrum of combined immune deficiencies in humans (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RBPSUH (Recombining Binding Protein, SUppressor of Hairless), also termed RBP-J or CSL, is the DNA-binding component of the transcription complex regulated by canonical Notch signaling. In the absence of Notch activation, RBPSUH suppresses target gene expression through interactions with a co-repressor complex containing histone deacetylase. Upon activation of Notch receptors, the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) translocates to the nucleus and binds to RBPSUH. This displaces the co-repressor complex and replaces it with a transcription activation complex that includes Mastermind-like (MAML) proteins and histone acetylase p300, leading to transcriptional activation of Notch target genes (1-3). RBPSUH is also the DNA-binding partner for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), a protein critical for latent viral transcription and immortalization of EBV-infected B cells (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: RBPSUH (Recombining Binding Protein, SUppressor of Hairless), also termed RBP-J or CSL, is the DNA-binding component of the transcription complex regulated by canonical Notch signaling. In the absence of Notch activation, RBPSUH suppresses target gene expression through interactions with a co-repressor complex containing histone deacetylase. Upon activation of Notch receptors, the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) translocates to the nucleus and binds to RBPSUH. This displaces the co-repressor complex and replaces it with a transcription activation complex that includes Mastermind-like (MAML) proteins and histone acetylase p300, leading to transcriptional activation of Notch target genes (1-3). RBPSUH is also the DNA-binding partner for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), a protein critical for latent viral transcription and immortalization of EBV-infected B cells (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The DNA repair protein Rad50 is a member of the structural maintenance of chromosomes family (SMC) and plays an important role in cell cycle checkpoint signaling and double-strand break repair in response to DNA damage (1-4). Rad50 forms a complex with Mre11 and Nbs1 that becomes activated in response to DNA damage (3). In normal human cells, the MRN complex acts to tether linear DNA molecules, providing a flexible link between DNA ends (1). Genomic instability and cancer have been shown to develop in cells with genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the MRN complex (2). ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Rad50 at Ser635 in response to DNA damage is important in regulating downstream signaling, DNA repair and checkpoint control (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The DNA repair protein Rad50 is a member of the structural maintenance of chromosomes family (SMC) and plays an important role in cell cycle checkpoint signaling and double-strand break repair in response to DNA damage (1-4). Rad50 forms a complex with Mre11 and Nbs1 that becomes activated in response to DNA damage (3). In normal human cells, the MRN complex acts to tether linear DNA molecules, providing a flexible link between DNA ends (1). Genomic instability and cancer have been shown to develop in cells with genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the MRN complex (2). ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Rad50 at Ser635 in response to DNA damage is important in regulating downstream signaling, DNA repair and checkpoint control (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially hazardous lesions that can be induced by ionizing radiation (IR), radiomimetic chemicals, or DNA replication inhibitors. Cells detect and repair DSBs through two distinct but partly overlapping signaling pathways, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). DNA repair through the HR pathway is restricted to S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, while NHEJ can occur during any cell cycle phase. Defects in both pathways have been associated with human disease, including cancer (1).DNA repair through the NHEJ pathway involves a core group of proteins that includes the Ku heterodimer, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, and XLF. XLF interacts with XRCC4 and promotes the ligation of DNA strands by DNA ligase IV and the ligase cofactor XRCC4. The ATP-dependent ligation of free DNA ends is the final step in the NHEJ repair pathway (2). Research studies suggest that XLF and XRCC4 proteins form complexes that bridge DNA breaks earlier in the NHEJ pathway (3). Additional studies indicate that localization of XRCC4 to the nucleus and levels of XRCC4 protein are both regulated by DNA ligase IV (4). Mutations in the corresponding LIG4 gene are associated with LIG4 syndrome, a disorder characterized by immunodeficiency and developmental growth delay. Cells isolated from patients diagnosed with LIG4 syndrome display typical cell cycle checkpoint activity, but aberrant rejoining of DNA double strand breaks (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: BLM, a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, is part of the BRCA1-associated genome surveillance complex (BASC) that responds to DNA damage, stalled replication forks and S phase arrest (1-4). Phosphorylation of BLM helicase at Thr99 and Thr122 occurs in response to genotoxic stress (4), and phosphorylation of Ser144 appears to be important in regulating chromosome stability during mitosis (5). Typical BLM protein resides in the nucleus and forms part of a dynamic protein complex that acts in response to DNA damage during specific periods of the cell cycle (6). Although RecQ helicases are rarely considered as essential enzymes, they function at the interface between DNA recombination and repair and are required for global genome stability maintenance. Mutations in BLM helicase are responsible for development of Bloom Syndrome, a recessive genetic disorder clinically characterized by short stature, immunodeficiency and elevated risk of malignancy (7). Similar alterations to genes encoding the related RecQ helicases RecQ4 and WRN also result in recessive genetic disorders associated with genomic instability (8,9). Cells from Bloom Syndrome patients exhibit genomic instability and increased frequency of sister chromatid exchange (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially hazardous lesions that can be induced by ionizing radiation (IR), radiomimetic chemicals, or DNA replication inhibitors. Cells sense and repair DSBs via two distinct but partly overlapping signaling pathways, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Research studies have shown that defects in both pathways are associated with human disease, including cancer (reviewed in 1).DSBs that arise during S or G2 phase are repaired via homologous recombination (HR), using the replicated sister chromatid as a repair template. Rad51 recombinase, a eukaryotic homologue of E. coli RecA, polymerizes and forms a filament along single-stranded DNA, mediating HR with the help of auxiliary proteins, including Rad54 and BRCA2 (reviewed in 2,3). BRCA2 binds Rad51 and targets it to single-stranded DNA, allowing it to displace replication protein A (RPA) (4). Five Rad51 paralogs exist in vertebrates (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) and they all appear to be required for efficient HR (5).Researchers have found that mutations in the Rad51 gene may be related to breast cancer risk (6). Some studies have implicated Rad51 as a potential marker for pancreatic cancer (7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially hazardous lesions that can be induced by ionizing radiation (IR), radiomimetic chemicals, or DNA replication inhibitors. Cells sense and repair DSBs via two distinct but partly overlapping signaling pathways, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Defects in both pathways have been associated with human disease, including cancer (1). The DNA repair and recombination protein RAD54-like (Rad54, RAD54L) is a Swi2/Snf2 family DNA helicase that is involved in homologous recombination DNA repair. Rad54 is a double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase that translocates in a processive manner along double-stranded DNA. The Rad54 helicase interacts with the Rad51 recombinase to regulate its DNA binding and strand exchange activities during homologous recombination (2-4). Mutations in the corresponding RAD54L gene are associated with multiple forms of human cancer, including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast cancer, and parathyroid adenoma (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).