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Human Genetic Imprinting

$108
250 PCR reactions
500 µl
SimpleChIP® Human H19/Igf2 Imprinting Control Region Primers contain a mix of forward and reverse PCR primers that are specific to the human H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR). These primers can be used to amplify DNA that has been isolated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Primers have been optimized for use in SYBR® Green quantitative real-time PCR and have been tested in conjunction with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits #9002 and #9003 and ChIP-validated antibodies from Cell Signaling Technology®. The H19/Igf2 genes are regulated by an imprinting control region that binds CTCF.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to either identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome or to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). ChIP can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors, and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. Fragmented chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or quantitative real-time PCR are often used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8). SimpleChIP® primers have been optimized for amplification of ChIP-isolated DNA using real-time quantitative PCR and provide important positive and negative controls that can be used to confirm a successful ChIP experiment.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog, the Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS), are highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcriptional activation and repression, insulator function, and imprinting control regions (ICRs) (1-4). Although they have divergent amino and carboxy termini, both proteins contain 11 conserved zinc finger domains that work in combination to bind the same DNA elements (1). CTCF is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to transcriptional regulation of cell-growth regulated genes, including c-myc, p19/ARF, p16/INK4A, BRCA1, p53, p27, E2F1, and TERT (1). CTCF also binds to and is required for the enhancer-blocking activity of all known insulator elements and ICRs, including the H19/IgF2, Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, and Inactive X-Specific Transcript (XIST) anti-sense loci (5-7). CTCF DNA-binding is sensitive to DNA methylation, a mark that determines selection of the imprinted allele (maternal vs. paternal) (1). The various functions of CTCF are regulated by at least two different post-translational modifications. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF is required for insulator function (8). Phosphorylation of Ser612 by protein kinase CK2 facilitates a switch of CTCF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator at the c-myc promoter (9). CTCF mutations or deletions have been found in many breast, prostate, and Wilms tumors (10,11). Expression of BORIS is restricted to spermatocytes and is mutually exclusive of CTCF (3). In cells expressing BORIS, promoters of X-linked cancer-testis antigens like MAGE-1A are demethylated and activated, but methylated and inactive in CTCF-expressing somatic cells (12). Like other testis specific proteins, BORIS is abnormally expressed in different cancers, such as breast cancer, and has a greater affinity than CTCF for DNA binding sites, detracting from CTCF’s potential tumor suppressing activity (1,3,13,14).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog, the Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS), are highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcriptional activation and repression, insulator function, and imprinting control regions (ICRs) (1-4). Although they have divergent amino and carboxy termini, both proteins contain 11 conserved zinc finger domains that work in combination to bind the same DNA elements (1). CTCF is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to transcriptional regulation of cell-growth regulated genes, including c-myc, p19/ARF, p16/INK4A, BRCA1, p53, p27, E2F1, and TERT (1). CTCF also binds to and is required for the enhancer-blocking activity of all known insulator elements and ICRs, including the H19/IgF2, Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, and Inactive X-Specific Transcript (XIST) anti-sense loci (5-7). CTCF DNA-binding is sensitive to DNA methylation, a mark that determines selection of the imprinted allele (maternal vs. paternal) (1). The various functions of CTCF are regulated by at least two different post-translational modifications. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF is required for insulator function (8). Phosphorylation of Ser612 by protein kinase CK2 facilitates a switch of CTCF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator at the c-myc promoter (9). CTCF mutations or deletions have been found in many breast, prostate, and Wilms tumors (10,11). Expression of BORIS is restricted to spermatocytes and is mutually exclusive of CTCF (3). In cells expressing BORIS, promoters of X-linked cancer-testis antigens like MAGE-1A are demethylated and activated, but methylated and inactive in CTCF-expressing somatic cells (12). Like other testis specific proteins, BORIS is abnormally expressed in different cancers, such as breast cancer, and has a greater affinity than CTCF for DNA binding sites, detracting from CTCF’s potential tumor suppressing activity (1,3,13,14).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is the founding member of a family of methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins that also includes MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, MBD4, MBD5 and MBD6 (1-3). Apart from MBD3, these proteins bind methylated cytosine residues in the context of the di-nucleotide 5´-CG-3´ to establish and maintain regions of transcriptionally inactive chromatin by recruiting a variety of co-repressor proteins (2). MeCP2 recruits histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 (4-6). MBD1 couples transcriptional silencing to DNA replication and interacts with the histone methyltransferases ESET and SUV39H1 (7,8). MBD2 and MBD3 co-purify as part of the NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation) co-repressor complex, which contains the chromatin remodeling ATPase Mi-2, HDAC1 and HDAC2 (9,10). MBD5 and MBD6 have recently been identified and little is known regarding their protein interactions. MBD proteins are associated with cancer and other diseases; MBD4 is best characterized for its role in DNA repair and MBD2 has been linked to intestinal cancer (11,12). Mutations in the MeCP2 gene cause the neurologic developmental disorder Rett Syndrome (13). MeCP2 protein levels are high in neurons, where it plays a critical role in multiple synaptic processes (14). In response to various physiological stimuli, MeCP2 is phosphorylated on Ser421 and regulates the expression of genes controlling dendritic patterning and spine morphogenesis (14). Disruption of this process in individuals with altered MeCP2 may cause the pathological changes seen in Rett Syndrome.

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® CTCF siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit CTCF expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog, the Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS), are highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcriptional activation and repression, insulator function, and imprinting control regions (ICRs) (1-4). Although they have divergent amino and carboxy termini, both proteins contain 11 conserved zinc finger domains that work in combination to bind the same DNA elements (1). CTCF is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to transcriptional regulation of cell-growth regulated genes, including c-myc, p19/ARF, p16/INK4A, BRCA1, p53, p27, E2F1, and TERT (1). CTCF also binds to and is required for the enhancer-blocking activity of all known insulator elements and ICRs, including the H19/IgF2, Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, and Inactive X-Specific Transcript (XIST) anti-sense loci (5-7). CTCF DNA-binding is sensitive to DNA methylation, a mark that determines selection of the imprinted allele (maternal vs. paternal) (1). The various functions of CTCF are regulated by at least two different post-translational modifications. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF is required for insulator function (8). Phosphorylation of Ser612 by protein kinase CK2 facilitates a switch of CTCF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator at the c-myc promoter (9). CTCF mutations or deletions have been found in many breast, prostate, and Wilms tumors (10,11). Expression of BORIS is restricted to spermatocytes and is mutually exclusive of CTCF (3). In cells expressing BORIS, promoters of X-linked cancer-testis antigens like MAGE-1A are demethylated and activated, but methylated and inactive in CTCF-expressing somatic cells (12). Like other testis specific proteins, BORIS is abnormally expressed in different cancers, such as breast cancer, and has a greater affinity than CTCF for DNA binding sites, detracting from CTCF’s potential tumor suppressing activity (1,3,13,14).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® BRCA1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit BRCA1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated DNMT3B (D7O7O) Rabbit mAb #67259.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ARID4A/RbBP1 was originally identified as an RB binding protein, which could repress E2F-mediated transcription through the recruitment of the mSIN3A complex (1-3). Like other AT-rich interacting domain (ARID) containing proteins, ARID4A/RbBP1 functions as a tumor suppressor, and is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer (4-6). ARID4A/RbBP1 and ARID4B/RbBP1L1 are mainly expressed in Sertoli cells in the testes, where they form a complex and serve as coactivators for androgen receptors to regulate spermatogenesis (7).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog, the Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS), are highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcriptional activation and repression, insulator function, and imprinting control regions (ICRs) (1-4). Although they have divergent amino and carboxy termini, both proteins contain 11 conserved zinc finger domains that work in combination to bind the same DNA elements (1). CTCF is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to transcriptional regulation of cell-growth regulated genes, including c-myc, p19/ARF, p16/INK4A, BRCA1, p53, p27, E2F1, and TERT (1). CTCF also binds to and is required for the enhancer-blocking activity of all known insulator elements and ICRs, including the H19/IgF2, Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, and Inactive X-Specific Transcript (XIST) anti-sense loci (5-7). CTCF DNA-binding is sensitive to DNA methylation, a mark that determines selection of the imprinted allele (maternal vs. paternal) (1). The various functions of CTCF are regulated by at least two different post-translational modifications. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF is required for insulator function (8). Phosphorylation of Ser612 by protein kinase CK2 facilitates a switch of CTCF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator at the c-myc promoter (9). CTCF mutations or deletions have been found in many breast, prostate, and Wilms tumors (10,11). Expression of BORIS is restricted to spermatocytes and is mutually exclusive of CTCF (3). In cells expressing BORIS, promoters of X-linked cancer-testis antigens like MAGE-1A are demethylated and activated, but methylated and inactive in CTCF-expressing somatic cells (12). Like other testis specific proteins, BORIS is abnormally expressed in different cancers, such as breast cancer, and has a greater affinity than CTCF for DNA binding sites, detracting from CTCF’s potential tumor suppressing activity (1,3,13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) is a member of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of proteins that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (1). The three types of PRMTs share the ability to mono-methylate arginine residues, but vary in their ability to generate differential methylation states (1-3). Mono-methylated arginine residues are further methylated by type I PRMTs to generate an asymmetric di-methyl arginine or by type II PRMTs to form a symmetric-dimethyl arginine. Type III methyltransferases are only able to mono-methylate arginine residues (1-3). Research studies indicate that PRMT7 is a type III PRMT that displays substrate specificity for an arginine-X-arginine (RXR) motif surrounded by several basic residues (4,5). PRMT7 interacts with a wide array of protein substrates and likely plays a role in many biological processes including pluripotency, neuronal differentiation, genomic instability, snRNP biogenesis, and breast cancer metastasis (6-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated MeCP2 (D4F3) XP® Rabbit mAb #3456.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is the founding member of a family of methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins that also includes MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, MBD4, MBD5 and MBD6 (1-3). Apart from MBD3, these proteins bind methylated cytosine residues in the context of the di-nucleotide 5´-CG-3´ to establish and maintain regions of transcriptionally inactive chromatin by recruiting a variety of co-repressor proteins (2). MeCP2 recruits histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 (4-6). MBD1 couples transcriptional silencing to DNA replication and interacts with the histone methyltransferases ESET and SUV39H1 (7,8). MBD2 and MBD3 co-purify as part of the NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation) co-repressor complex, which contains the chromatin remodeling ATPase Mi-2, HDAC1 and HDAC2 (9,10). MBD5 and MBD6 have recently been identified and little is known regarding their protein interactions. MBD proteins are associated with cancer and other diseases; MBD4 is best characterized for its role in DNA repair and MBD2 has been linked to intestinal cancer (11,12). Mutations in the MeCP2 gene cause the neurologic developmental disorder Rett Syndrome (13). MeCP2 protein levels are high in neurons, where it plays a critical role in multiple synaptic processes (14). In response to various physiological stimuli, MeCP2 is phosphorylated on Ser421 and regulates the expression of genes controlling dendritic patterning and spine morphogenesis (14). Disruption of this process in individuals with altered MeCP2 may cause the pathological changes seen in Rett Syndrome.