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Human Nucleosome Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Sucrose nonfermenting 2 homolog (SNF2H, SMARCA5) is one of two orthologs of the ISWI (imitation switch) ATPases encoded by the mammalian genome (1). SNF2H is part of the SNF2 family of chromatin remodeling factors that use ATP hydrolysis to catalyze biochemical reactions in several mammalian chromatin-remodeling complexes, including ACF1, RSF1, CHRAC, NoRC, WSTF, and WCRF180 (2). Research studies show that SNF2H is crucial for chromatin organization, DNA damage response, and differentiation (1-7). The SNF2H helicase facilitates DNA damage repair by actively moving nucleosomes for DNA damage response (DDR) proteins to effectively associate with damaged regions (3). Additional studies show that repair of double stranded breaks (DSBs) significantly decreases in the absence of SNF2H (3), and these cells become highly sensitive to DNA damage caused by x-rays and chemical treatments inducing DSBs (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SMARCA1 (SNF2L) is one of the two orthologs of the ISWI (imitation switch) ATPases encoded by the mammalian genome (1). The ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes were first identified in Drosophila and have been shown to remodel and alter nucleosome spacing in vitro (2). SMARCA1 is the catalytic subunit of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF) and CECR2-containing remodeling factor (CERF) complexes (3-5). The NURF complex plays an important role in neuronal physiology by promoting neurite outgrowth and regulation of Engrailed homeotic genes that are involved in neuronal development in the mid-hindbrain (3). NURF is also thought to be involved in the maturation of T cells from thymocytes by regulating chromatin structure and expression of genes important for T cell development (6). The largest subunit of the NURF complex, BPTF, is required for proper development of mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm tissue lineages, suggesting a role for SMARCA1 in the development of the germ layers in mouse embryo (7). Disruption of the CERF complex by deletion of CECR2, an interacting partner of SMARCA1, is associated with the neural tube defect exencephaly, linking the CERF complex with regulation of neurulation (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SMARCA1 (SNF2L) is one of the two orthologs of the ISWI (imitation switch) ATPases encoded by the mammalian genome (1). The ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes were first identified in Drosophila and have been shown to remodel and alter nucleosome spacing in vitro (2). SMARCA1 is the catalytic subunit of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF) and CECR2-containing remodeling factor (CERF) complexes (3-5). The NURF complex plays an important role in neuronal physiology by promoting neurite outgrowth and regulation of Engrailed homeotic genes that are involved in neuronal development in the mid-hindbrain (3). NURF is also thought to be involved in the maturation of T cells from thymocytes by regulating chromatin structure and expression of genes important for T cell development (6). The largest subunit of the NURF complex, BPTF, is required for proper development of mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm tissue lineages, suggesting a role for SMARCA1 in the development of the germ layers in mouse embryo (7). Disruption of the CERF complex by deletion of CECR2, an interacting partner of SMARCA1, is associated with the neural tube defect exencephaly, linking the CERF complex with regulation of neurulation (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Calcineurin binding protein CABIN1 was originally identified as an inhibitor of the calcium-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase, calcineurin. CABIN1 inhibits calcineurin signaling in T cells, regulating T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, transcription, and apoptosis (1-4). CABIN1 represses myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-mediated transcription by recruiting chromatin remodeling enzymes (5), and also negatively regulates the activity of the tumor suppressor p53 (6). In response to genotoxic stress, CABIN1 is degraded and releases its inhibition of p53, allowing p53 to elicit cellular stress responses (7). CABIN1 is also involved in regulation of chromatin structure as part of the highly conserved HIRA/UBN1/CABIN1/ASF1A (HUCA) histone chaperone complex (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially hazardous lesions that can be induced by ionizing radiation (IR), radiomimetic chemicals, or DNA replication inhibitors. Melanoma associated antigen (mutated) 1 (MUM1, EXPAND1) is a PWWP-domain containing chromatin binding protein involved in maintaining chromatin architecture of interphase chromosomes. In response to DNA damage, EXPAND1/MUM1 accumulates at sites of DNA double strand breaks through direct interaction with DNA repair factor 53BP1 (1). Accumulation of EXPAND1/MUM1 at damaged DNA sites is thought to modify the structure of the chromatin and allow access to other DNA repair factors (2). 53BP1 activates the checkpoint kinase ATM and promotes DNA double strand break repair via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RBAP46 and RBAP48; also known as RBBP7 and RBBP4) were first characterized in human cells as proteins that bind to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (1). Since then, these proteins have been shown to be components of many protein complexes involved in chromatin regulation, including the chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) complex and type B histone acetyltransferase complex HAT1, both of which function in chromatin assembly during DNA replication (2,3). RBAP46 and RBAP48 are also found in the nucleosome remodeling factor complex NURF, the nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation complex NuRD, and the Sin3/HDAC histone de-acetylation complex (4-7). More recently, RBAP46 and RBAP48 were identified as components of the polycomb repressor complex PRC2, which also contains EED and Ezh2 (8). RBAP46 and RBAP48 bind to the histone fold region of histone H4 and are believed to target these chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone de-acetylation complexes to their histone substrates (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RBAP46 and RBAP48; also known as RBBP7 and RBBP4) were first characterized in human cells as proteins that bind to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (1). Since then, these proteins have been shown to be components of many protein complexes involved in chromatin regulation, including the chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) complex and type B histone acetyltransferase complex HAT1, both of which function in chromatin assembly during DNA replication (2,3). RBAP46 and RBAP48 are also found in the nucleosome remodeling factor complex NURF, the nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation complex NuRD, and the Sin3/HDAC histone de-acetylation complex (4-7). More recently, RBAP46 and RBAP48 were identified as components of the polycomb repressor complex PRC2, which also contains EED and Ezh2 (8). RBAP46 and RBAP48 bind to the histone fold region of histone H4 and are believed to target these chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone de-acetylation complexes to their histone substrates (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). There are five major variants of histone H2A: canonical H2A (most abundant), H2A.X, MacroH2A, H2ABbd and H2A.Z (2). Histone H2A.Z, the most conserved variant across species, functions as both a positive and negative regulator of transcription and is important for chromosome stability (2). Several homologous protein complexes, such as SWR-C (S. cerevisiae), TIP60 (D. melanogaster) and SRCAP (mammals), have been shown to catalyze the ATP-dependent exchange of H2A.Z for H2A in the nucleosome (3,4,5). This exchange of histone H2A variants changes histone-histone interactions in the nucleosome core and alters an acidic patch on the surface of the nucleosome, resulting in changes in nucleosome stability and binding of non-histone proteins such as HP1α (6,7).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). There are five major variants of histone H2A: canonical H2A (most abundant), H2A.X, MacroH2A, H2ABbd and H2A.Z (2). Histone H2A.Z, the most conserved variant across species, functions as both a positive and negative regulator of transcription and is important for chromosome stability (2). Several homologous protein complexes, such as SWR-C (S. cerevisiae), TIP60 (D. melanogaster) and SRCAP (mammals), have been shown to catalyze the ATP-dependent exchange of H2A.Z for H2A in the nucleosome (3,4,5). This exchange of histone H2A variants changes histone-histone interactions in the nucleosome core and alters an acidic patch on the surface of the nucleosome, resulting in changes in nucleosome stability and binding of non-histone proteins such as HP1α (6,7).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Acetyl-Histone H2AZ (Lys4/Lys7) Rabbit mAb #75336.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). There are five major variants of histone H2A: canonical H2A (most abundant), H2A.X, MacroH2A, H2ABbd and H2A.Z (2). Histone H2A.Z, the most conserved variant across species, functions as both a positive and negative regulator of transcription and is important for chromosome stability (2). Several homologous protein complexes, such as SWR-C (S. cerevisiae), TIP60 (D. melanogaster) and SRCAP (mammals), have been shown to catalyze the ATP-dependent exchange of H2A.Z for H2A in the nucleosome (3,4,5). This exchange of histone H2A variants changes histone-histone interactions in the nucleosome core and alters an acidic patch on the surface of the nucleosome, resulting in changes in nucleosome stability and binding of non-histone proteins such as HP1α (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). There are five major variants of histone H2A: canonical H2A (most abundant), H2A.X, MacroH2A, H2ABbd and H2A.Z (2). Histone H2A.Z, the most conserved variant across species, functions as both a positive and negative regulator of transcription and is important for chromosome stability (2). Several homologous protein complexes, such as SWR-C (S. cerevisiae), TIP60 (D. melanogaster) and SRCAP (mammals), have been shown to catalyze the ATP-dependent exchange of H2A.Z for H2A in the nucleosome (3,4,5). This exchange of histone H2A variants changes histone-histone interactions in the nucleosome core and alters an acidic patch on the surface of the nucleosome, resulting in changes in nucleosome stability and binding of non-histone proteins such as HP1α (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Histone macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 comprise a family of variant histone H2A proteins. MacroH2A1 exists as two distinct isoforms due to alternative splicing of a single gene; macroH2A1.1 levels accumulate throughout differentiation and development while macroH2A1.2 shows a constant level of expression (1). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are encoded by completely distinct genes located on separate chromosomes (2,3). Both macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 proteins contain an amino-terminal histone-like region with 64% sequence identity to canonical histone H2A, in addition to a carboxy-terminal “macro” domain (1-3). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are enriched in facultative heterochromatin, including inactivated X chromosomes in mammalian females and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (2-5). Both act to repress gene transcription by inhibiting the binding of transcription factors to chromatin, the acetylation of histones by p300, and the chromatin-remodeling activities of SWI/SNF and ACF (6,7). The macro domain of macroH2A1.1 binds to ADP-ribose and functions to recruit macroH2A1.1 to activated PARP at sites of DNA damage, where it mediates chromatin rearrangements to locally regulate the DNA damage response (8). MacroH2A1.2 and macroH2A2 do not bind poly-ADP-ribose and are not recruited to sites of activated PARP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive brainstem astrocyte tumor arising mostly in children, leading to a long-term survival rate of less than 10%. Multiple whole-genome sequencing studies of DIPG patients identified commonly occurring mutations in the H3F3A gene encoding histone H3.3. One of these mutations, a lysine to methionine amino acid substitution (K27M), is found in up to 78% of DIPGs and 22% of non-brainstem pediatric gliomas (1-3). This mutation is associated with poor prognosis, with a mean survival time of 0.73 years for patients with the K27M mutation versus 4.6 years for patients without the mutation (1-3). Expression of the K27M mutant histone H3 is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the levels of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated trimethylation of histone H3, changes in the distribution of PRC2 on the genome, and altered expression of genes associated with various cancer pathways (4-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chondroblastoma is a rare type of benign tumor that is found at the rounded ends of the long bones in the arms and legs. More than 90% of chondroblastomas have been found to contain a heterozygous mutation in the H3F3A gene encoding the histone variant H3.3 (1). This mutation, a lysine to methionine amino acid substitution in codon 36 (K36M), inhibits at least two histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases, WHSC1 (MMSET) and SETD2, resulting in the reduction of global levels of histone H3 lysine 36 methylation (1). Chondrocytes containing the histone H3 K36M mutation exhibit several hallmarks of cancer cells, including increased ability to form colonies, resistance to apoptosis, and defects in differentiation. Reduction of global methylation levels in chondrocytes, resulting from the K36M mutation, contributes to tumorigenesis by altering the expression of cancer-associated genes. The histone H3 K36M mutation is also found to promote sarcomagenesis by impairing the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells, resulting in undifferentiated sarcomas (2). The K36M mutation alters the histone methylation landscape, resulting in a genome-wide gain in histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and redistribution of polycomb respressive complex 1 and derepression of its target genes known to block mesenchymal differentiation. Finally, the histone H3 K36M mutation is also found in 13% of HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carinomas, again contributing to tumorigenesis by altering global methylation levels of histone H3 lysine 36 (3).