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Human Nucleotide Phosphorylation

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PNK (polynucleotide kinase) is a DNA repair enzyme that participates in single strand break repair and non-homologous end rejoining (NHEJ) for double strand breaks. PNK possesses a 5'-DNA kinase activity and a 3'-DNA phosphatase activity (1,2). It has three domains, a C-terminal kinase domain, a central phosphatase domain, and an N-terminal forkhead associated (FHA) domain that is responsible for protein-protein interactions. Reduction in expression of PNK by RNAi sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors (3)

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NDK/NME/NM23 kinase family (encoded by the NME gene family) consists of at least eight distinct proteins that exhibit different cellular localization (1). Members of this group inhibit metastasis in a variety of tumor cell types (2). All NDK/NME/NM23 proteins possess nucleoside diphosphatase kinase (NDK) activity and catalyze the phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphate to the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate to regulate a diverse array of cellular events (3). At least four classes of NDK biochemical activities have been described, including protein-protein interactions (4-6), regulation of GTP-binding protein function (7-9), DNA-associated activities (10,11), and histidine-dependent protein phosphotransferase activity (12). NDK/NME proteins participate in the regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular responses, including development, differentiation, proliferation, endocytosis, and apoptosis (13). Because of its role in metastasis suppression and oncogenesis, NDKA (NME1/NM23-H1) has been widely studied (14). NDKA (NM23-H1) and NDKB (NM23-H2) are encoded by adjacent NME1 and NME2 genes and share 90% sequence identity. Two serine residues (Ser122 and Ser144) on NDKA/NM23-H1 can be phosphorylated by AMPKα1, but only phosphorylation at Ser122 determines whether NDKA channels ATP to AMPKα1. This regulates AMPKα1 activity towards ACC1, an important regulator of fatty acid metabolism (15). Mutation of NDKB/NM23-H2 at Ser122 (S122P) in melanoma cells results in altered phosphoryl transfer activity (16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The NDK/NME/NM23 kinase family (encoded by the NME gene family) consists of at least eight distinct proteins that exhibit different cellular localization (1). Members of this group inhibit metastasis in a variety of tumor cell types (2). All NDK/NME/NM23 proteins possess nucleoside diphosphatase kinase (NDK) activity and catalyze the phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphate to the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate to regulate a diverse array of cellular events (3). At least four classes of NDK biochemical activities have been described, including protein-protein interactions (4-6), regulation of GTP-binding protein function (7-9), DNA-associated activities (10,11), and histidine-dependent protein phosphotransferase activity (12). NDK/NME proteins participate in the regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular responses, including development, differentiation, proliferation, endocytosis, and apoptosis (13). Because of its role in metastasis suppression and oncogenesis, NDKA (NME1/NM23-H1) has been widely studied (14). NDKA (NM23-H1) and NDKB (NM23-H2) are encoded by adjacent NME1 and NME2 genes and share 90% sequence identity. Two serine residues (Ser122 and Ser144) on NDKA/NM23-H1 can be phosphorylated by AMPKα1, but only phosphorylation at Ser122 determines whether NDKA channels ATP to AMPKα1. This regulates AMPKα1 activity towards ACC1, an important regulator of fatty acid metabolism (15). Mutation of NDKB/NM23-H2 at Ser122 (S122P) in melanoma cells results in altered phosphoryl transfer activity (16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NDK/NME/NM23 kinase family (encoded by the NME gene family) consists of at least eight distinct proteins that exhibit different cellular localization (1). Members of this group inhibit metastasis in a variety of tumor cell types (2). All NDK/NME/NM23 proteins possess nucleoside diphosphatase kinase (NDK) activity and catalyze the phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphate to the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate to regulate a diverse array of cellular events (3). At least four classes of NDK biochemical activities have been described, including protein-protein interactions (4-6), regulation of GTP-binding protein function (7-9), DNA-associated activities (10,11), and histidine-dependent protein phosphotransferase activity (12). NDK/NME proteins participate in the regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular responses, including development, differentiation, proliferation, endocytosis, and apoptosis (13). Because of its role in metastasis suppression and oncogenesis, NDKA (NME1/NM23-H1) has been widely studied (14). NDKA (NM23-H1) and NDKB (NM23-H2) are encoded by adjacent NME1 and NME2 genes and share 90% sequence identity. Two serine residues (Ser122 and Ser144) on NDKA/NM23-H1 can be phosphorylated by AMPKα1, but only phosphorylation at Ser122 determines whether NDKA channels ATP to AMPKα1. This regulates AMPKα1 activity towards ACC1, an important regulator of fatty acid metabolism (15). Mutation of NDKB/NM23-H2 at Ser122 (S122P) in melanoma cells results in altered phosphoryl transfer activity (16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NDK/NME/NM23 kinase family (encoded by the NME gene family) consists of at least eight distinct proteins that exhibit different cellular localization (1). Members of this group inhibit metastasis in a variety of tumor cell types (2). All NDK/NME/NM23 proteins possess nucleoside diphosphatase kinase (NDK) activity and catalyze the phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphate to the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate to regulate a diverse array of cellular events (3). At least four classes of NDK biochemical activities have been described, including protein-protein interactions (4-6), regulation of GTP-binding protein function (7-9), DNA-associated activities (10,11), and histidine-dependent protein phosphotransferase activity (12). NDK/NME proteins participate in the regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular responses, including development, differentiation, proliferation, endocytosis, and apoptosis (13). Because of its role in metastasis suppression and oncogenesis, NDKA (NME1/NM23-H1) has been widely studied (14). NDKA (NM23-H1) and NDKB (NM23-H2) are encoded by adjacent NME1 and NME2 genes and share 90% sequence identity. Two serine residues (Ser122 and Ser144) on NDKA/NM23-H1 can be phosphorylated by AMPKα1, but only phosphorylation at Ser122 determines whether NDKA channels ATP to AMPKα1. This regulates AMPKα1 activity towards ACC1, an important regulator of fatty acid metabolism (15). Mutation of NDKB/NM23-H2 at Ser122 (S122P) in melanoma cells results in altered phosphoryl transfer activity (16).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: XPB and XPD are ATPase/helicase subunits of the TFIIH complex that are involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) to remove lesions and photoproducts generated by UV light (1). XPB and XPD are 3’-5’ and 5’-3’ DNA helicases, respectively, that play a role in opening of the DNA damage site to facilitate repair (2,3). XPB and XPD both play an important role in maintaining genomic stability, and researchers have linked mutations of these proteins to Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Trichothiodystrophy (TTD). XP patients have abnormalities in skin pigmentation and are highly susceptible to skin cancers, while TTD patients exhibit symptoms such as brittle hair, neurological abnormalities, and mild photosensitivity (4). In addition to their role in NER, XPB and XPD are involved in transcription initiation as part of the TFIIH core complex (5). The helicase activity of XPB unwinds DNA around the transcription start site to facilitate RNA polymerase II promoter clearance and initiation of transcription (6). XPD plays a structural role linking core TFIIH components with the cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex that phosphorylates the C-terminus of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, leading to transcription initiation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine kinases play a critical role in generating the DNA synthetic precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) by catalyzing the phosphotransfer of phosphate from ATP to deoxythymidine (dT) and thymidine (T) in the cell. There are two known thymidine kinases, cytoplasmic thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) (1,2). Unlike TK2, which is not modulated by the cell cycle, TK1 expression and activity is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, accumulating during G1-phase to peak levels in S-phase before being degraded prior to cell division (3,4). Stability, but not activity, may be regulated via phosphorylation of TK1 at Ser13 by Cdc2 and/or Cdk2, but the precise mode of regulation remains elusive (5). These observations indicate that TK1 might be a useful marker of cell proliferation; however, recent studies have shown that TK1 plays a more significant role in the DNA damage response (6). Genotoxic stress promotes increased TK1 expression and kinase activity resulting in reduced cellular apoptosis and enhanced DNA repair efficiency (6). More importantly, numerous studies show that TK1 expression and activity are upregulated during neoplasia and disease progression in humans, and increased serum levels of TK1 correlate with poor prognosis and decreased survival in patients with various types of advanced tumors (7-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine kinases play a critical role in generating the DNA synthetic precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) by catalyzing the phosphotransfer of phosphate from ATP to deoxythymidine (dT) and thymidine (T) in the cell. There are two known thymidine kinases, cytoplasmic thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) (1,2). Unlike TK2, which is not modulated by the cell cycle, TK1 expression and activity is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, accumulating during G1-phase to peak levels in S-phase before being degraded prior to cell division (3,4). Stability, but not activity, may be regulated via phosphorylation of TK1 at Ser13 by Cdc2 and/or Cdk2, but the precise mode of regulation remains elusive (5). These observations indicate that TK1 might be a useful marker of cell proliferation; however, recent studies have shown that TK1 plays a more significant role in the DNA damage response (6). Genotoxic stress promotes increased TK1 expression and kinase activity resulting in reduced cellular apoptosis and enhanced DNA repair efficiency (6). More importantly, numerous studies show that TK1 expression and activity are upregulated during neoplasia and disease progression in humans, and increased serum levels of TK1 correlate with poor prognosis and decreased survival in patients with various types of advanced tumors (7-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: XPB and XPD are ATPase/helicase subunits of the TFIIH complex that are involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) to remove lesions and photoproducts generated by UV light (1). XPB and XPD are 3’-5’ and 5’-3’ DNA helicases, respectively, that play a role in opening of the DNA damage site to facilitate repair (2,3). XPB and XPD both play an important role in maintaining genomic stability, and researchers have linked mutations of these proteins to Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Trichothiodystrophy (TTD). XP patients have abnormalities in skin pigmentation and are highly susceptible to skin cancers, while TTD patients exhibit symptoms such as brittle hair, neurological abnormalities, and mild photosensitivity (4). In addition to their role in NER, XPB and XPD are involved in transcription initiation as part of the TFIIH core complex (5). The helicase activity of XPB unwinds DNA around the transcription start site to facilitate RNA polymerase II promoter clearance and initiation of transcription (6). XPD plays a structural role linking core TFIIH components with the cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex that phosphorylates the C-terminus of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, leading to transcription initiation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H. The complex is involved in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating an activating residue in the T-loop domain of cdks (1). Regulation of CAK activity is mediated by T-loop phosphorylation and by association with MAT1, both of which enhance its kinase activity toward the CTD of RNA polymerase II (2,3) and other substrates such as p53 (4). CAK is an essential component of the transcription complex TFIIH and may interact directly with TFIIH helicases (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H. The complex is involved in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating an activating residue in the T-loop domain of cdks (1). Regulation of CAK activity is mediated by T-loop phosphorylation and by association with MAT1, both of which enhance its kinase activity toward the CTD of RNA polymerase II (2,3) and other substrates such as p53 (4). CAK is an essential component of the transcription complex TFIIH and may interact directly with TFIIH helicases (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin H belongs to a conserved cyclin family that plays a critical role in the regulation of cell cycle dependent kinases (CDKs) necessary for cell cycle progression (1,2). In general, the activity of CDKs requires the binding of appropriate cyclins as well as phosphorylation driven by Cdk-activating kinase (CAK). Cyclin H is part of the CAK complex that includes the kinase CDK7, and an assembly factor p36/Mat1, which enhances binding between cyclin H and CDK7 and increases activity (3,4). CAK regulates progression through the cell cycle by activating cdc2, CDK2, and CDK4 kinases through phosphorylation of a critical threonine residue in the T-loop of the CDK-cyclin complexes (5,6). The CAK complex can exist either in its free form or in association with transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) which can affect its substrate specificity (7,8,9). When bound to TFIIH, CAK preferentially phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (9), providing a link between cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation, and DNA repair.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The highly conserved receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), homologous to the β subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins, was originally identified through its binding of active PKCβII and other classical PKC isoforms (1). RACK1 is a scaffold protein that recruits PKC and a wide range of other proteins to specific subcellular locations, promoting the formation of multiprotein complexes to induce and integrate various signaling pathways (reviewed in 2). One example of this is its enhancement of PKC-dependent JNK activation (3). RACK1 protein also resides in the eukaryotic ribosome, suggesting the possibility that RACK1 participates in the assembly of signaling complexes that regulate translation as well (reviewed in 4). RACK1 binds the SH2 domain of Src, and phosphorylation of RACK1 by Src occurs at Tyr228 after PKC activation (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The highly conserved receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), homologous to the β subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins, was originally identified through its binding of active PKCβII and other classical PKC isoforms (1). RACK1 is a scaffold protein that recruits PKC and a wide range of other proteins to specific subcellular locations, promoting the formation of multiprotein complexes to induce and integrate various signaling pathways (reviewed in 2). One example of this is its enhancement of PKC-dependent JNK activation (3). RACK1 protein also resides in the eukaryotic ribosome, suggesting the possibility that RACK1 participates in the assembly of signaling complexes that regulate translation as well (reviewed in 4). RACK1 binds the SH2 domain of Src, and phosphorylation of RACK1 by Src occurs at Tyr228 after PKC activation (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CAD is essential for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and possesses the following enzymatic activities: glutamine amidotransferase, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase. Thus, the enzyme converts glutamine to uridine monophosphate, a common precursor of all pyrimidine bases, and it is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis (1). In resting cells, CAD is localized mainly in the cytoplasm where it carries out pyrimidine synthesis. As proliferating cells enter S phase, MAP Kinase (Erk1/2) phosphorlyates CAD at Thr456, resulting in CAD translocation to the nucleus. As cells exit S phase, CAD is dephosphorylated at Thr456 and phosphorylated at Ser1406 by PKA, returning the pathway to basal activity (2). Various research studies have shown increased expression of CAD in several types of cancer, prompting the development of pharmacological inhibitors such as PALA. Further studies have identified CAD as a potential predictive early marker of prostate cancer relapse (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CAD is essential for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and possesses the following enzymatic activities: glutamine amidotransferase, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase. Thus, the enzyme converts glutamine to uridine monophosphate, a common precursor of all pyrimidine bases, and it is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis (1). In resting cells, CAD is localized mainly in the cytoplasm where it carries out pyrimidine synthesis. As proliferating cells enter S phase, MAP Kinase (Erk1/2) phosphorlyates CAD at Thr456, resulting in CAD translocation to the nucleus. As cells exit S phase, CAD is dephosphorylated at Thr456 and phosphorylated at Ser1406 by PKA, returning the pathway to basal activity (2). Various research studies have shown increased expression of CAD in several types of cancer, prompting the development of pharmacological inhibitors such as PALA. Further studies have identified CAD as a potential predictive early marker of prostate cancer relapse (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CAD is essential for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and possesses the following enzymatic activities: glutamine amidotransferase, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase. Thus, the enzyme converts glutamine to uridine monophosphate, a common precursor of all pyrimidine bases, and it is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis (1). In resting cells, CAD is localized mainly in the cytoplasm where it carries out pyrimidine synthesis. As proliferating cells enter S phase, MAP Kinase (Erk1/2) phosphorlyates CAD at Thr456, resulting in CAD translocation to the nucleus. As cells exit S phase, CAD is dephosphorylated at Thr456 and phosphorylated at Ser1406 by PKA, returning the pathway to basal activity (2). Various research studies have shown increased expression of CAD in several types of cancer, prompting the development of pharmacological inhibitors such as PALA. Further studies have identified CAD as a potential predictive early marker of prostate cancer relapse (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: CAD is essential for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and possesses the following enzymatic activities: glutamine amidotransferase, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase. Thus, the enzyme converts glutamine to uridine monophosphate, a common precursor of all pyrimidine bases, and it is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis (1). In resting cells, CAD is localized mainly in the cytoplasm where it carries out pyrimidine synthesis. As proliferating cells enter S phase, MAP Kinase (Erk1/2) phosphorlyates CAD at Thr456, resulting in CAD translocation to the nucleus. As cells exit S phase, CAD is dephosphorylated at Thr456 and phosphorylated at Ser1406 by PKA, returning the pathway to basal activity (2). Various research studies have shown increased expression of CAD in several types of cancer, prompting the development of pharmacological inhibitors such as PALA. Further studies have identified CAD as a potential predictive early marker of prostate cancer relapse (3).