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Human Regulation of Hair Follicle Development

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, is distinguished by multiple cysteine-rich ligand-binding domains, a single transmembrane sequence and a noncatalytic cytoplasmic domain (1). p75NTR displays paradoxical functions when acting alone or with other receptor proteins. Working in concert with Trk receptors, p75NTR recognizes neurotrophins and transmits trophic signals into the cell. Both p75NTR and TrkA are required to activate PI3K-Akt signaling, while TrkA can individually activate the MAP kinase pathway. In contrast, p75NTR, possibly through JNK, ensures appropriate apoptosis of injured neurons and improperly targeted neonatal neurons (2).The p75NTR protein undergoes sequential cleavage similar to APP and Notch. First, α-secretase removes the p75NTR ectodomain, eliminating ligand-mediated signaling. At this point, the membrane-tethered cleavage product can still fine-tune Trk-mediated trophic actions. γ-secretase cleaves within the transmembrane domain to liberate the cytoplasmic tail from its membrane anchor and allow the p75NTR intracellular domain to translocate to the nucleus (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, is distinguished by multiple cysteine-rich ligand-binding domains, a single transmembrane sequence and a noncatalytic cytoplasmic domain (1). p75NTR displays paradoxical functions when acting alone or with other receptor proteins. Working in concert with Trk receptors, p75NTR recognizes neurotrophins and transmits trophic signals into the cell. Both p75NTR and TrkA are required to activate PI3K-Akt signaling, while TrkA can individually activate the MAP kinase pathway. In contrast, p75NTR, possibly through JNK, ensures appropriate apoptosis of injured neurons and improperly targeted neonatal neurons (2).The p75NTR protein undergoes sequential cleavage similar to APP and Notch. First, α-secretase removes the p75NTR ectodomain, eliminating ligand-mediated signaling. At this point, the membrane-tethered cleavage product can still fine-tune Trk-mediated trophic actions. γ-secretase cleaves within the transmembrane domain to liberate the cytoplasmic tail from its membrane anchor and allow the p75NTR intracellular domain to translocate to the nucleus (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis mediated by death factors like FasL and TNF-α involves the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to their respective receptors (1). Upon ligand activation to their receptors, Fas and TNF-R1 associate with death domain (DD) containing adaptor proteins FADD (Fas associated death domain) (2,3) and TRADD (TNF-R1 associated death domain) (4). In addition to its carboxy-terminal DD, FADD contains an amino-terminal death effector domain (DED) that binds to DEDs found on caspase-8 which leads to activation of this initiator caspase (5,6). Caspase-8 subsequently activates downstream effector caspases, like caspase-3, resulting in the cleavage of proteins involved in the execution of apoptosis. Unlike FADD, TRADD does not contain a DED (4). Apoptosis driven by TNF-R1 binding to TRADD involves association of TRADD and FADD which then leads to activation of caspase-8 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis mediated by death factors like FasL and TNF-α involves the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to their respective receptors (1). Upon ligand activation to their receptors, Fas and TNF-R1 associate with death domain (DD) containing adaptor proteins FADD (Fas associated death domain) (2,3) and TRADD (TNF-R1 associated death domain) (4). In addition to its carboxy-terminal DD, FADD contains an amino-terminal death effector domain (DED) that binds to DEDs found on caspase-8 which leads to activation of this initiator caspase (5,6). Caspase-8 subsequently activates downstream effector caspases, like caspase-3, resulting in the cleavage of proteins involved in the execution of apoptosis. Unlike FADD, TRADD does not contain a DED (4). Apoptosis driven by TNF-R1 binding to TRADD involves association of TRADD and FADD which then leads to activation of caspase-8 (7).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmits TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the recepter-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Briefly, activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved SSXS motif at the carboxy-terminus of the proteins. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad, Smad4, and together the complex moves to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmits TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the recepter-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Briefly, activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved SSXS motif at the carboxy-terminus of the proteins. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad, Smad4, and together the complex moves to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$345
100 µg
Neutralizing antibodies can be used to inhibit normal biological function through their binding to biological molecules. These reagents can be used to determine the effects that a particular molecule has in biological systems. TNF-α has known functions of cell cytotoxicity, cell activation, and apoptosis in different cell types. Human TNF-α Neutralizing (D1B4) Rabbit mAb has been shown to neutralize the cytotoxic effects of TNF-α in L-929 mouse fibroblast cells. Utilizing 1 ng/ml of hTNF-α #8902 and 1 µg/ml of actinomycin D, Human TNF-α Neutralizing (D1B4) Rabbit mAb rescued L-929 cells with an ND50 in the range of 4-12 ng/ml.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Frizzled (Fzd) belongs to the seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily (1). Fzds have a large extracellular N-terminal region containing a cysteine-rich domain (CRD), which is involved in binding to Wnt proteins (1,2). The intracellular C-terminus binds to the PDZ domain of Dvl proteins, a major signaling component downstream of Fzd (3). Wnt proteins bind to Fzd and the co-receptors LRP5 or LPR6, and activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway through inhibiting phosphorylation of β-catenin by GSK3-β (4,5). In addition to this canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, some Wnt proteins can also activate the Fzd/Ca2+ pathway and Fzd/PCP (planar cell polarity) pathway (6,7). The mammalian Fzd subfamily has 10 members (Fzd1 to Fzd10) and they may mediate signaling through different pathways (8). Some Fzds can also bind to other secreted proteins, like Norrin and R-Spondin (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD109 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked glycoprotein that belongs to the alpha2-macroglobulin family of thioester containing proteins (1). CD109 is associated with TGF-beta receptor I (TbRI) and inhibits TGF-beta signaling (2,3). Cleavage of CD109 at its Furin cleavage site results in the release of its large amino-terminal domain, which then binds to the TGF-beta receptor I to inhibit TGF-beta signaling (4-7). CD109 is expressed on a subset of CD34+ bone marrow cells and mesenchymal stem cells, activated platelets, activated T-cells, endothelial cells, and a wide variety of tumors (8-10). Elevated CD109 expression has been considered a diagnostic/prognostic marker for several types of cancers (11-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Salvador homolog (SAV1), originally named WW45, was first identified as a 45 kDa protein containing a pair of WW domains and a coiled-coil region (1). SAV1 was subsequently shown to function as a scaffold protein, in a protein complex that includes the kinases MST2 and LATS1, and the transcriptional co-activator YAP (2). This protein complex comprises the core components of the Hippo signaling pathway, which regulates important cellular functions, including contact inhibition and apoptosis, that function to regulate tissue growth and organ size (3,4). A genetic screen in Drosophila identified a role for SAV1 in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis (5), while embryonic mice lacking Sav1 displayed hyperplastic growth and epithelial differentiation effects (6). These findings, together with the observation that SAV1 is mutated a number of human cancer cell lines, suggest that SAV1 functions as a tumor suppressor in the Hippo signaling pathway (5, 7).