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Human Regulation of Heterotypic Cell-Cell Adhesion

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Erk5 (Mitogen-activated protein kinase 7, Big mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) is a member of the MAPK superfamily implicated in the regulation numerous cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and survival (1-4). Like other MAPK family members, Erk5 contains a canonical activation loop TEY motif (Thr218/Tyr220) that is specifically phosphorylated by MAP2K5 (MEK5) in a growth-factor-dependent, Ras-independent mechanism (5-7). For example, EGF stimulation promotes Erk5 phosphorylation that induces its translocation to the nucleus where it phosphorylates MEF2C and other transcriptional targets (5,6). Erk5 is also activated in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in hematopoietic progenitor cells where it promotes survival and proliferation (7). In neuronal cells, Erk5 is required for NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, neuronal homeostasis, and survival (8,9). Erk5 is thought to play a role in blood vessel integrity via maintenance of endothelial cell migration and barrier function (10-12). Although broadly expressed, research studies have shown that mice lacking erk5 display numerous cardiac defects, suggesting Erk5 plays a critical role in vascular development and homeostasis (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Erk5 (Mitogen-activated protein kinase 7, Big mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) is a member of the MAPK superfamily implicated in the regulation numerous cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and survival (1-4). Like other MAPK family members, Erk5 contains a canonical activation loop TEY motif (Thr218/Tyr220) that is specifically phosphorylated by MAP2K5 (MEK5) in a growth-factor-dependent, Ras-independent mechanism (5-7). For example, EGF stimulation promotes Erk5 phosphorylation that induces its translocation to the nucleus where it phosphorylates MEF2C and other transcriptional targets (5,6). Erk5 is also activated in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in hematopoietic progenitor cells where it promotes survival and proliferation (7). In neuronal cells, Erk5 is required for NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, neuronal homeostasis, and survival (8,9). Erk5 is thought to play a role in blood vessel integrity via maintenance of endothelial cell migration and barrier function (10-12). Although broadly expressed, research studies have shown that mice lacking erk5 display numerous cardiac defects, suggesting Erk5 plays a critical role in vascular development and homeostasis (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Erk5 (Mitogen-activated protein kinase 7, Big mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) is a member of the MAPK superfamily implicated in the regulation numerous cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and survival (1-4). Like other MAPK family members, Erk5 contains a canonical activation loop TEY motif (Thr218/Tyr220) that is specifically phosphorylated by MAP2K5 (MEK5) in a growth-factor-dependent, Ras-independent mechanism (5-7). For example, EGF stimulation promotes Erk5 phosphorylation that induces its translocation to the nucleus where it phosphorylates MEF2C and other transcriptional targets (5,6). Erk5 is also activated in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in hematopoietic progenitor cells where it promotes survival and proliferation (7). In neuronal cells, Erk5 is required for NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, neuronal homeostasis, and survival (8,9). Erk5 is thought to play a role in blood vessel integrity via maintenance of endothelial cell migration and barrier function (10-12). Although broadly expressed, research studies have shown that mice lacking erk5 display numerous cardiac defects, suggesting Erk5 plays a critical role in vascular development and homeostasis (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The founding members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) superfamily include pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β, and a third protein that acts as an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). At least six similar proteins have been recently identified, including a homolog of IL-1RA (IL1F5). The three better-characterized proteins (IL-1a, IL-1b and IL-1RA) are mainly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, and dendritic cells. IL-1a and IL-1b act as potent inflammatory cytokines that help regulate host defense and immune responses (1). Binding of these pro-inflammatory cytokines to an IL-1 receptor recruits adapter proteins (such as IRAK) to the receptor. Phosphorylation of these adaptor proteins promotes downstream signaling cascades associated with the immune response (2). Altered expression of both IL-1a and IL-1b is associated with an extensive list of human disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and various forms of cancer (3,4). IL-1RA acts as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, binding the IL-1 receptor to limit the response to inflammation (5). Because it plays a key role in regulating the inflammatory response, recombinant IL-1RA is a therapeutic agent used in the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Alternatively, mutation of the corresponding IL-1RA gene may be associated with susceptibility to the development of specific cancers (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® ERK5 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit ERK5 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Erk5 (Mitogen-activated protein kinase 7, Big mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) is a member of the MAPK superfamily implicated in the regulation numerous cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and survival (1-4). Like other MAPK family members, Erk5 contains a canonical activation loop TEY motif (Thr218/Tyr220) that is specifically phosphorylated by MAP2K5 (MEK5) in a growth-factor-dependent, Ras-independent mechanism (5-7). For example, EGF stimulation promotes Erk5 phosphorylation that induces its translocation to the nucleus where it phosphorylates MEF2C and other transcriptional targets (5,6). Erk5 is also activated in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in hematopoietic progenitor cells where it promotes survival and proliferation (7). In neuronal cells, Erk5 is required for NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, neuronal homeostasis, and survival (8,9). Erk5 is thought to play a role in blood vessel integrity via maintenance of endothelial cell migration and barrier function (10-12). Although broadly expressed, research studies have shown that mice lacking erk5 display numerous cardiac defects, suggesting Erk5 plays a critical role in vascular development and homeostasis (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Erk5 (Mitogen-activated protein kinase 7, Big mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) is a member of the MAPK superfamily implicated in the regulation numerous cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and survival (1-4). Like other MAPK family members, Erk5 contains a canonical activation loop TEY motif (Thr218/Tyr220) that is specifically phosphorylated by MAP2K5 (MEK5) in a growth-factor-dependent, Ras-independent mechanism (5-7). For example, EGF stimulation promotes Erk5 phosphorylation that induces its translocation to the nucleus where it phosphorylates MEF2C and other transcriptional targets (5,6). Erk5 is also activated in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in hematopoietic progenitor cells where it promotes survival and proliferation (7). In neuronal cells, Erk5 is required for NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, neuronal homeostasis, and survival (8,9). Erk5 is thought to play a role in blood vessel integrity via maintenance of endothelial cell migration and barrier function (10-12). Although broadly expressed, research studies have shown that mice lacking erk5 display numerous cardiac defects, suggesting Erk5 plays a critical role in vascular development and homeostasis (1,2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ApoAI (Apolipoprotein A1) is a major component of high density lipoprotein (HDL, the “good cholesterol”) in plasma. It is produced in the liver and small intestine. ApoA1 is a cofactor for lecithin cholesterolacyltransferase (LCAT) that is responsible for the formation of plasma cholesteryl esters and promotes cholesterol efflux from tissues to the liver for excretion. Defects in ApoA1 are associated with high density lipoprotein deficiency (HDLD) and systemic non-neuropathic amyloidosis (1-3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: KLF4 is a member of the erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) multigene family that is highly expressed in the differentiating layers of the epidermis (1, 2). KLF4 plays a critical role in the differentiation of epithelial cells and is essential for normal gastric homeostasis (2,3). Depending on the target gene, KLF4 can function as both a repressor and activator of transcription (4). Research studies suggest this protein may function as either a tumor suppressor or an oncogene depending on tumor type, with up-regulation in human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and down-regulation in colorectal carcinoma (5,6). The in vitro reprogramming of somatic cells to an embryonic-like state has been achieved by retroviral transduction of four factors: Oct-3/4, Sox2, c-Myc, and KLF4 (7). These induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are of great therapeutic interest as they exhibit the key characteristics and growth properties of pluripotent stem cells (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: KLF4 is a member of the erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) multigene family that is highly expressed in the differentiating layers of the epidermis (1, 2). KLF4 plays a critical role in the differentiation of epithelial cells and is essential for normal gastric homeostasis (2,3). Depending on the target gene, KLF4 can function as both a repressor and activator of transcription (4). Research studies suggest this protein may function as either a tumor suppressor or an oncogene depending on tumor type, with up-regulation in human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and down-regulation in colorectal carcinoma (5,6). The in vitro reprogramming of somatic cells to an embryonic-like state has been achieved by retroviral transduction of four factors: Oct-3/4, Sox2, c-Myc, and KLF4 (7). These induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are of great therapeutic interest as they exhibit the key characteristics and growth properties of pluripotent stem cells (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure of secreted macromolecules surrounding mammalian organs and tissues. Controlled interactions between cells and the ECM are important in proliferation, migration, survival, polarity, and differentiation. Cells contact the ECM primarily through heterodimeric integral membrane proteins called integrins. Integrins connect the ECM to the cytoskeleton, and therefore the cell signaling machinery, through protein complexes called focal adhesions (1).The ILK/PINCH/Parvin (IPP) complex is composed of three highly conserved proteins recruited to sites of ECM contact as pre-assembled structures. The IPP acts at the interface of the integrin/actin connection to regulate formation of focal adhesions and integrin signaling. All three proteins contain multiple protein binding domains allowing them to function as adaptor proteins in the formation of focal adhesions. ILK (integrin-linked kinase) also has a catalytic (protein Ser/Thr kinase) domain, and may or may not function as a kinase in vivo. Roles for IPP proteins outside of the IPP complex have been proposed, including regulation of gene expression (2,3).The parvin family consists of 3 members, α-parvin/actopaxin, β-parvin/affixin, and γ-parvin. α-parvin and β-parvin are expressed ubiquitously, while expression of γ-parvin is restricted to hematopoietic cells (4). α-parvin binds to f-actin both directly and via interaction with the focal adhesion protein paxillin (5). α-parvin regulates cell spreading and motility through interactions with the cofilin kinase TESK1 (6), and with the GTPase activating protein CdGAP (7). Phosphorylation of α-parvin during mitosis may have a role in the regulation of actin dynamics during the cell cycle (8).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure of secreted macromolecules surrounding mammalian organs and tissues. Controlled interactions between cells and the ECM are important in proliferation, migration, survival, polarity, and differentiation. Cells contact the ECM primarily through heterodimeric integral membrane proteins called integrins. Integrins connect the ECM to the cytoskeleton, and therefore the cell signaling machinery, through protein complexes called focal adhesions (1).The ILK/PINCH/Parvin (IPP) complex is composed of three highly conserved proteins recruited to sites of ECM contact as pre-assembled structures. The IPP acts at the interface of the integrin/actin connection to regulate formation of focal adhesions and integrin signaling. All three proteins contain multiple protein binding domains allowing them to function as adaptor proteins in the formation of focal adhesions. ILK (integrin-linked kinase) also has a catalytic (protein Ser/Thr kinase) domain, and may or may not function as a kinase in vivo. Roles for IPP proteins outside of the IPP complex have been proposed, including regulation of gene expression (2,3).The parvin family consists of 3 members, α-parvin/actopaxin, β-parvin/affixin, and γ-parvin. α-parvin and β-parvin are expressed ubiquitously, while expression of γ-parvin is restricted to hematopoietic cells (4). α-parvin binds to f-actin both directly and via interaction with the focal adhesion protein paxillin (5). α-parvin regulates cell spreading and motility through interactions with the cofilin kinase TESK1 (6), and with the GTPase activating protein CdGAP (7). Phosphorylation of α-parvin during mitosis may have a role in the regulation of actin dynamics during the cell cycle (8).

$348
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. α-Parvin (D7F9) XP® Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for the immunoprecipitation of α-Parvin. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Parvin (D7F9) XP® Rabbit mAb #8190.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure of secreted macromolecules surrounding mammalian organs and tissues. Controlled interactions between cells and the ECM are important in proliferation, migration, survival, polarity, and differentiation. Cells contact the ECM primarily through heterodimeric integral membrane proteins called integrins. Integrins connect the ECM to the cytoskeleton, and therefore the cell signaling machinery, through protein complexes called focal adhesions (1).The ILK/PINCH/Parvin (IPP) complex is composed of three highly conserved proteins recruited to sites of ECM contact as pre-assembled structures. The IPP acts at the interface of the integrin/actin connection to regulate formation of focal adhesions and integrin signaling. All three proteins contain multiple protein binding domains allowing them to function as adaptor proteins in the formation of focal adhesions. ILK (integrin-linked kinase) also has a catalytic (protein Ser/Thr kinase) domain, and may or may not function as a kinase in vivo. Roles for IPP proteins outside of the IPP complex have been proposed, including regulation of gene expression (2,3).The parvin family consists of 3 members, α-parvin/actopaxin, β-parvin/affixin, and γ-parvin. α-parvin and β-parvin are expressed ubiquitously, while expression of γ-parvin is restricted to hematopoietic cells (4). α-parvin binds to f-actin both directly and via interaction with the focal adhesion protein paxillin (5). α-parvin regulates cell spreading and motility through interactions with the cofilin kinase TESK1 (6), and with the GTPase activating protein CdGAP (7). Phosphorylation of α-parvin during mitosis may have a role in the regulation of actin dynamics during the cell cycle (8).

$209
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PerCP-Cy5.5® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$219
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$179
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$79
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$129
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$179
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE-Cy5® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).