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Human Regulation of Histone Modification

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination is an important posttranslational modification that regulates protein function and fate (1). Ubiquitin (Ub) can be conjugated to target proteins in either monomeric or polymeric forms. There are several different lysine residues within Ub that can be used as conjugation sites for poly-Ub chain formation. Different poly-Ub linkages mediate different functions of the target protein ranging from alterations in protein function to degradation (2). UBE2N/Ubc13 is a ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme that catalyzes K63-linked poly-Ub chain formation (1,2). UBE2N forms a heterodimer with MMS2 or Uev1A to exert its E2 ligase function. The UBE2N/MMS2 and UBE2N/Uev1A heterodimers catalyze different modes of target protein ubiquitination to mediate various signaling pathways (3-5) including: DNA damage and recombination, p53 and check point control, the cell cycle (6-10), immunoreceptor signaling (11,12), and endocytosis (13). Most recently, UBE2N was shown to play an important role in inflammatory signaling by promoting K63-linked ubiquitination and activation of IKK downstream of the IL-1β receptor (14). Furthermore, interaction of UBE2N with the Triad1 E3 protein-ubiquitin ligase was shown to play an important role in myelopoiesis (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination is an important posttranslational modification that regulates protein function and fate (1). Ubiquitin (Ub) can be conjugated to target proteins in either monomeric or polymeric forms. There are several different lysine residues within Ub that can be used as conjugation sites for poly-Ub chain formation. Different poly-Ub linkages mediate different functions of the target protein ranging from alterations in protein function to degradation (2). UBE2N/Ubc13 is a ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme that catalyzes K63-linked poly-Ub chain formation (1,2). UBE2N forms a heterodimer with MMS2 or Uev1A to exert its E2 ligase function. The UBE2N/MMS2 and UBE2N/Uev1A heterodimers catalyze different modes of target protein ubiquitination to mediate various signaling pathways (3-5) including: DNA damage and recombination, p53 and check point control, the cell cycle (6-10), immunoreceptor signaling (11,12), and endocytosis (13). Most recently, UBE2N was shown to play an important role in inflammatory signaling by promoting K63-linked ubiquitination and activation of IKK downstream of the IL-1β receptor (14). Furthermore, interaction of UBE2N with the Triad1 E3 protein-ubiquitin ligase was shown to play an important role in myelopoiesis (15).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: P-TEFb is a general transcription factor that regulates transcription elongation through phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The P-TEFb complex is composed of a catalytic subunit, CDK9, and its regulatory cyclin partner, which can be cyclin T1, T2a, T2b or K (reviewed in 1,2). P-TEFb is recruited by the HIV Tat protein to allow transcriptional elongation, and subsequent replication of the viral genome. Inhibition of P-TEFb function therefore has potential for HIV therapy. CDK9 exists as two isoforms, an abundant 42 kDa isoform, and a less abundant 55 kDa isoform, which contains an amino-terminal extension (3). The two forms likely have distinct purposes based on differential expression during lymphocyte activation (4,5) and on their localization within the nucleus (5).Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated in part by cyclin binding and by phosphorylation of a conserved threonine in the T-loop domain. Phosphorylation of CDK9 at the T-loop Thr186 by an unidentified nuclear kinase may be important in P-TEFb activation (6) and regulation of HIV transcription (7). Acetylation of CDK9 at Lys44 affects its ability to phosphorylate the RNAPII CTD (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: P-TEFb is a general transcription factor that regulates transcription elongation through phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The P-TEFb complex is composed of a catalytic subunit, CDK9, and its regulatory cyclin partner, which can be cyclin T1, T2a, T2b or K (reviewed in 1,2). P-TEFb is recruited by the HIV Tat protein to allow transcriptional elongation, and subsequent replication of the viral genome. Inhibition of P-TEFb function therefore has potential for HIV therapy. CDK9 exists as two isoforms, an abundant 42 kDa isoform, and a less abundant 55 kDa isoform, which contains an amino-terminal extension (3). The two forms likely have distinct purposes based on differential expression during lymphocyte activation (4,5) and on their localization within the nucleus (5).Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated in part by cyclin binding and by phosphorylation of a conserved threonine in the T-loop domain. Phosphorylation of CDK9 at the T-loop Thr186 by an unidentified nuclear kinase may be important in P-TEFb activation (6) and regulation of HIV transcription (7). Acetylation of CDK9 at Lys44 affects its ability to phosphorylate the RNAPII CTD (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CDK9 (C12F7) Rabbit mAb #2316.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: P-TEFb is a general transcription factor that regulates transcription elongation through phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The P-TEFb complex is composed of a catalytic subunit, CDK9, and its regulatory cyclin partner, which can be cyclin T1, T2a, T2b or K (reviewed in 1,2). P-TEFb is recruited by the HIV Tat protein to allow transcriptional elongation, and subsequent replication of the viral genome. Inhibition of P-TEFb function therefore has potential for HIV therapy. CDK9 exists as two isoforms, an abundant 42 kDa isoform, and a less abundant 55 kDa isoform, which contains an amino-terminal extension (3). The two forms likely have distinct purposes based on differential expression during lymphocyte activation (4,5) and on their localization within the nucleus (5).Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated in part by cyclin binding and by phosphorylation of a conserved threonine in the T-loop domain. Phosphorylation of CDK9 at the T-loop Thr186 by an unidentified nuclear kinase may be important in P-TEFb activation (6) and regulation of HIV transcription (7). Acetylation of CDK9 at Lys44 affects its ability to phosphorylate the RNAPII CTD (8).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Aurora A (Thr288)/Aurora B (Thr232)/Aurora C (Thr198) (D13A11) XP® Rabbit mAb #2914.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Aurora A (Thr288)/Aurora B (Thr232)/Aurora C (Thr198) (D13A11) XP® Rabbit mAb  #2914.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: SET7/SET9 is a member of the SET domain-containing family, and can specifically methylate Lys4 on histone H3 (1). Like most other lysine-directed histone methyltransferases, it contains a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste and Trithorax proteins. Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Methylation of histone H3 Lys4 enhances transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (4,5). In addition, methylation of lysine 4 blocks transcriptional repression by inhibiting the binding of the NURD histone deacetylation complex to the amino-terminal tail of histone H3 and interfering with SUV39H1-mediated methylation of histone H3 Lys9 (1). SET7/SET9 is highly active on free histone H3, but only very weakly methylates H3 within nucleosomes (1). Besides histones, SET7/SET9 also methylates Lys189 of the TAF10, a member of the TFIID transcription factor complex, and Lys372 of the p53 tumor suppressor protein (6,7). Methylation of TAF10 stimulates transcription in a promoter-specific manner by increasing the affinity of TAF10 for RNA polymerase II, which may potentiate pre-initiation complex formation (6). Methylation of p53 at Lys372 increases protein stability and leads to upregulation of target genes such as p21. Thus the loss of SET7/SET9 may represent another mechanism for the inactivation of p53 in human cancers (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SET7/SET9 is a member of the SET domain-containing family, and can specifically methylate Lys4 on histone H3 (1). Like most other lysine-directed histone methyltransferases, it contains a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste and Trithorax proteins. Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Methylation of histone H3 Lys4 enhances transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (4,5). In addition, methylation of lysine 4 blocks transcriptional repression by inhibiting the binding of the NURD histone deacetylation complex to the amino-terminal tail of histone H3 and interfering with SUV39H1-mediated methylation of histone H3 Lys9 (1). SET7/SET9 is highly active on free histone H3, but only very weakly methylates H3 within nucleosomes (1). Besides histones, SET7/SET9 also methylates Lys189 of the TAF10, a member of the TFIID transcription factor complex, and Lys372 of the p53 tumor suppressor protein (6,7). Methylation of TAF10 stimulates transcription in a promoter-specific manner by increasing the affinity of TAF10 for RNA polymerase II, which may potentiate pre-initiation complex formation (6). Methylation of p53 at Lys372 increases protein stability and leads to upregulation of target genes such as p21. Thus the loss of SET7/SET9 may represent another mechanism for the inactivation of p53 in human cancers (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Histone macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 comprise a family of variant histone H2A proteins. MacroH2A1 exists as two distinct isoforms due to alternative splicing of a single gene; macroH2A1.1 levels accumulate throughout differentiation and development while macroH2A1.2 shows a constant level of expression (1). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are encoded by completely distinct genes located on separate chromosomes (2,3). Both macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 proteins contain an amino-terminal histone-like region with 64% sequence identity to canonical histone H2A, in addition to a carboxy-terminal “macro” domain (1-3). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are enriched in facultative heterochromatin, including inactivated X chromosomes in mammalian females and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (2-5). Both act to repress gene transcription by inhibiting the binding of transcription factors to chromatin, the acetylation of histones by p300, and the chromatin-remodeling activities of SWI/SNF and ACF (6,7). The macro domain of macroH2A1.1 binds to ADP-ribose and functions to recruit macroH2A1.1 to activated PARP at sites of DNA damage, where it mediates chromatin rearrangements to locally regulate the DNA damage response (8). MacroH2A1.2 and macroH2A2 do not bind poly-ADP-ribose and are not recruited to sites of activated PARP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Histone macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 comprise a family of variant histone H2A proteins. MacroH2A1 exists as two distinct isoforms due to alternative splicing of a single gene; macroH2A1.1 levels accumulate throughout differentiation and development while macroH2A1.2 shows a constant level of expression (1). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are encoded by completely distinct genes located on separate chromosomes (2,3). Both macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 proteins contain an amino-terminal histone-like region with 64% sequence identity to canonical histone H2A, in addition to a carboxy-terminal “macro” domain (1-3). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are enriched in facultative heterochromatin, including inactivated X chromosomes in mammalian females and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (2-5). Both act to repress gene transcription by inhibiting the binding of transcription factors to chromatin, the acetylation of histones by p300, and the chromatin-remodeling activities of SWI/SNF and ACF (6,7). The macro domain of macroH2A1.1 binds to ADP-ribose and functions to recruit macroH2A1.1 to activated PARP at sites of DNA damage, where it mediates chromatin rearrangements to locally regulate the DNA damage response (8). MacroH2A1.2 and macroH2A2 do not bind poly-ADP-ribose and are not recruited to sites of activated PARP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Histone macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 comprise a family of variant histone H2A proteins. MacroH2A1 exists as two distinct isoforms due to alternative splicing of a single gene; macroH2A1.1 levels accumulate throughout differentiation and development while macroH2A1.2 shows a constant level of expression (1). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are encoded by completely distinct genes located on separate chromosomes (2,3). Both macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 proteins contain an amino-terminal histone-like region with 64% sequence identity to canonical histone H2A, in addition to a carboxy-terminal “macro” domain (1-3). MacroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are enriched in facultative heterochromatin, including inactivated X chromosomes in mammalian females and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (2-5). Both act to repress gene transcription by inhibiting the binding of transcription factors to chromatin, the acetylation of histones by p300, and the chromatin-remodeling activities of SWI/SNF and ACF (6,7). The macro domain of macroH2A1.1 binds to ADP-ribose and functions to recruit macroH2A1.1 to activated PARP at sites of DNA damage, where it mediates chromatin rearrangements to locally regulate the DNA damage response (8). MacroH2A1.2 and macroH2A2 do not bind poly-ADP-ribose and are not recruited to sites of activated PARP (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® BRCA1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit BRCA1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Jumonji/ARID domain-containing protein 2 (JARID2) is a founding member of the JmjC-domain-containing protein family that is involved in regulation of histone methyltransferase activity (1,2). While many proteins in this family are protein demethylases, JARID2 lacks several conserved residues in the catalytic domain and does not exhibit protein demethylase activity (1,2). Research studies indicate that JARID2 is a nuclear protein that is highly expressed in poorly differentiated and actively dividing cells, with expression decreasing upon cellular differentiation (3,4). Expression of JARID2 protein is essential for embryonic development as the protein plays an important role in regulation of heart and liver development, neural tube fusion, and hematopoiesis (4). JARID2 is an accessory component of the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2), which represses target gene expression through methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 by EZH2 methyltransferase (5-10). JARID2 recruits the PRC2 complex to target genes and increases EZH2 methyltransferase activity by binding to nucleosomes and DNA (5-10). Additional studies show that loss of JARID2 expression results in decreased recruitment of PRC2, decreased methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 at target genes, and delayed and incomplete differentiation of embryonic stem cells (5-10). Experimental knockdown of JARID2 in Xenopus laevis impairs the induction of gastrulation genes in blastula embryos and results in differentiation failure (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Aurora B/AIM1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Aurora B/AIM1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog, the Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS), are highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcriptional activation and repression, insulator function, and imprinting control regions (ICRs) (1-4). Although they have divergent amino and carboxy termini, both proteins contain 11 conserved zinc finger domains that work in combination to bind the same DNA elements (1). CTCF is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to transcriptional regulation of cell-growth regulated genes, including c-myc, p19/ARF, p16/INK4A, BRCA1, p53, p27, E2F1, and TERT (1). CTCF also binds to and is required for the enhancer-blocking activity of all known insulator elements and ICRs, including the H19/IgF2, Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, and Inactive X-Specific Transcript (XIST) anti-sense loci (5-7). CTCF DNA-binding is sensitive to DNA methylation, a mark that determines selection of the imprinted allele (maternal vs. paternal) (1). The various functions of CTCF are regulated by at least two different post-translational modifications. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF is required for insulator function (8). Phosphorylation of Ser612 by protein kinase CK2 facilitates a switch of CTCF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator at the c-myc promoter (9). CTCF mutations or deletions have been found in many breast, prostate, and Wilms tumors (10,11). Expression of BORIS is restricted to spermatocytes and is mutually exclusive of CTCF (3). In cells expressing BORIS, promoters of X-linked cancer-testis antigens like MAGE-1A are demethylated and activated, but methylated and inactive in CTCF-expressing somatic cells (12). Like other testis specific proteins, BORIS is abnormally expressed in different cancers, such as breast cancer, and has a greater affinity than CTCF for DNA binding sites, detracting from CTCF’s potential tumor suppressing activity (1,3,13,14).