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Human Small Gtpase Mediated Signal Transduction

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GTPase Regulator Associated with Focal Adhesion Kinase-1 (GRAF1), is a GTPase-activating protein for the small G proteins RhoA and Cdc42 (1). It is composed of an N-terminal BAR domain, a PH domain, a RhoGAP domain, a proline-rich domain, and a C-terminal SH3 domain. GRAF1 contributes to the clathrin-independent carriers/GPI-enriched early endosomal compartments (CLIC/GEEC) pathway, and was the first specific protein component of this endocytic pathway to be discovered (2). GRAF1 was identified as an important protein necessary for adeno-associated virus 2 infection (3). In addition, research studies have linked GRAF1 to mental retardation (4), skeletal muscle differentiation (5), and myeloid leukemia (6,7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 21 kDa guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (K-Ras, H-Ras, and N-Ras) cycle between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) forms (1). Receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors activate Ras, which then stimulates the Raf-MEK-MAPK pathway (2-4). GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) normally facilitate the inactivation of Ras. However, research studies have shown that in 30% of human tumors, point mutations in Ras prevent the GAP-mediated inhibition of this pathway (5). The most common oncogenic Ras mutation found in tumors is Gly12 to Asp12 (G12D), which prevents Ras inactivation, possibly by increasing the overall rigidity of the protein (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The RalA binding protein 1 (RalBP1 or RLIP76) was originally identified as a GTP-RalA associated protein that acted as a downstream RalA effector in regulating Ral-Ras signaling (1). RalBP1 interacts with RalA and the endocytosis protein REPS2 (POB1) through its carboxy-terminal Ral binding domain. RalBP1 has an intrinsic GTPase activating function and interacts with Cdc42 through its centrally located Rho-GAP domain (1-3). A protein complex containing RalBP1/POB1/RalA regulates endocytosis of membrane receptors (4). RalBP1 also functions as a non-ABC transporter that catalyzes the ATP-dependent transport of numerous xenobiotics, including glutathione conjugates and some chemotherapeutic agents. RalBP1 transporter activity may play an important role in detoxification, drug resistance and the stress response (5-7). Increased expression of RalBP1 protein is associated with some forms of cancer and regression of cancer xenografts results from RalBP1 inhibition (8,9). Evidence to date suggests that RalBP1 may be a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 21 kDa guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (K-Ras, H-Ras, and N-Ras) cycle between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) forms (1). Receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors activate Ras, which then stimulates the Raf-MEK-MAPK pathway (2-4). GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) normally facilitate the inactivation of Ras. However, research studies have shown that in 30% of human tumors, point mutations in Ras prevent the GAP-mediated inhibition of this pathway (5). The most common oncogenic Ras mutation found in tumors is Gly12 to Asp12 (G12D), which prevents Ras inactivation, possibly by increasing the overall rigidity of the protein (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The RalA binding protein 1 (RalBP1 or RLIP76) was originally identified as a GTP-RalA associated protein that acted as a downstream RalA effector in regulating Ral-Ras signaling (1). RalBP1 interacts with RalA and the endocytosis protein REPS2 (POB1) through its carboxy-terminal Ral binding domain. RalBP1 has an intrinsic GTPase activating function and interacts with Cdc42 through its centrally located Rho-GAP domain (1-3). A protein complex containing RalBP1/POB1/RalA regulates endocytosis of membrane receptors (4). RalBP1 also functions as a non-ABC transporter that catalyzes the ATP-dependent transport of numerous xenobiotics, including glutathione conjugates and some chemotherapeutic agents. RalBP1 transporter activity may play an important role in detoxification, drug resistance and the stress response (5-7). Increased expression of RalBP1 protein is associated with some forms of cancer and regression of cancer xenografts results from RalBP1 inhibition (8,9). Evidence to date suggests that RalBP1 may be a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: OCRL1 is an inositol 5-phosphatase that selectively dephosphorylates the 5 position of the inositol ring. Its substrates include phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (1). Research studies indicate that mutations in OCRL1 are linked to Oculocerebrorenal syndrome or Lowe syndrome, an X-linked disorder distinguished by mental retardation and congenital cataracts, as well as Dent's disease (2,3). OCRL1 interacts with several endocytic proteins, including clathrin, AP-2, and RabGTPases (4-7). OCRL1 is localized to the Golgi complex, endosomes, and late stage clathrin-coated pits (6,8). OCRL1 controls early endosome function (8), regulating membrane traffic from endosomes to the Golgi. It is also involved in cytokinesis (9) and cilia assembly (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Oligophrenin-1 is a RhoGTPase-activating protein encoded by the gene OPHN1 (1). Oligophrenin-1 is composed of an N-terminal BAR domain, a pleckstrin homology domain, a central RhoGAP domain, and three putative C-terminal SH3-binding sites. Oligophrenin-1 plays a role in membrane signaling through interaction of its BAR domain with curved membranes, binding of its pleckstrin homology domain with membrane phosphoinositides, and interaction of the SH3-binding sites with adaptor proteins (1-3). Oligophrenin-1 regulates synaptic vesicle endocytosis (3) and plays an important role in dendritic spine morphogenesis (4). Furthermore, by interacting with the transcription factor Rev-erbα and protecting it from degradation, Oligophrenin-1 participates in the regulation of the circadian rhythm in the hippocampus (5). Research studies have demonstrated an involvement of Oligophrenin-1 in X-linked mental retardation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Rho family of small GTPases, including Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, act as molecular switches that regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP (1). The serine- and proline-rich GAP protein, Cdc42 GAP (CdGAP), has been shown to be a negative regulator of both Cdc42 and Rac1, but not RhoA (2,3). This protein contains three domains: an amino-terminal GAP domain, a central domain, and a carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain containing five Src homology 3 (SH3)-binding sites. It is suggested that threonine and serine phosphorylation within the proline-rich domain likely alters protein-protein interactions and determines the localization of CdGAP (4). Phosphorylation of CdGAP on threonine 776 by both ERK-1 and GSK-3 has been shown to negatively regulate protein activity, possibly by inducing a conformational change within the protein disrupting its ability to bind SH3 domains (4,5). Upregulation of CdGAP has been shown to increase cell proliferation and it has been suggested that this protein may play a role in TGF-β-induced cell growth, motility, and invasion in some breast cancer cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Son of sevenless (SOS) was first identified in Drosophila as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Ras acting downstream of the Sevenless receptor (1). Two closely related homologs of Drosophila SOS are found in mammalian cells: SOS1 and SOS2 (2). SOS1 consists of histone folds, Dbl (DH) and pleckstrin (PH) homology domains, a Ras exchange motif (REM), and Cdc25 homology and polyproline domains (3). SOS1 binds to GRB2, NCK, and other adaptor proteins, and plays an important role in ERK activation downstream of protein tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK). Research studies have identified mutations in the corresponding SOS1 gene of patients with Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, and congenital heart defects (4,5).

$622
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® MAP Kinase Multi-Target Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that combines the reagents necessary to detect endogenous levels of phospho-p44/42 MAPK (Thr202/Tyr204), phospho-p38 MAPK (Thr180/Tyr182), MEK1, phospho-MEK1 (Ser217/221), SAPK/JNK and phospho-SAPK/JNK (Thr183/Tyr185). These molecules represent convergence points and key regulatory proteins in signaling pathways controlling cellular events such as growth, differentiation and the response to stress and inflammation. Sixteen tests are provided for each target protein. Specific assay formulations for the indicated target proteins can be found in the datasheets associated with the individual PathScan® Sandwich ELISA Kits**. Briefly, a capture antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, the target protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a detection antibody is added to detect the captured target protein. An HRP-linked secondary antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of bound target protein. *Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit. **See companion products.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Son of sevenless (SOS) was first identified in Drosophila as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Ras acting downstream of the Sevenless receptor (1). Two closely related homologs of Drosophila SOS are found in mammalian cells: SOS1 and SOS2 (2). SOS1 consists of histone folds, Dbl (DH) and pleckstrin (PH) homology domains, a Ras exchange motif (REM), and Cdc25 homology and polyproline domains (3). SOS1 binds to GRB2, NCK, and other adaptor proteins, and plays an important role in ERK activation downstream of protein tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK). Research studies have identified mutations in the corresponding SOS1 gene of patients with Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, and congenital heart defects (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial Rho GTPase 1 (Miro1, RHOT1) and mitochondrial Rho GTPase 2 (Miro2, RHOT2) are atypical Ras GTPase proteins that localize to the outer mitochondrial membrane (1,2). These evolutionarily conserved proteins contain GTP-binding domains and a pair of calcium-binding EF hand domains (1,2). Research studies indicate that Miro1 and Miro2 function in the axonal transport of mitochondria in neurons (2). Both Miro proteins play an essential role in mitochondrial trafficking by attaching mitochondria to essential motor and adaptor proteins (3). Miro GTPase proteins that are anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane interact with kinesin-binding proteins TRAK1 and TRAK2 to provide a link between mitochondria to microtubules (4). Increased levels of synaptic calcium appears to inhibit mitochondrial trafficking mediated by Miro, suggesting a role for the EF hand as a calcium sensor (5).