Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Human Spermatogenesis

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axl, Mer and Tyro3 are three members of the TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase that share a common NCAM (neural adhesion molecule)-related extracellular domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. These receptors bind common homologous vitamin K dependent protein GAS6 and protein S to activate downstream signaling pathways (1). TAM family receptors are involved in the development of immune, nervous, vascular and reproductive systems, autoimmune disease, cancer drug resistance and tumor immunity response (2-5). Axl (Tyr698), Axl (Tyr702), Mer Tyr(749) and Tyro3 (Tyr681) are conserved autophosphorylation sites located in the activation loop of the respective tyrosine kinase domains. Phosphorylation at these sites is required for full kinase activation of each of the corresponding receptors (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia) gene family contains at least three members that encode RNA-binding proteins with a common RNA-recognition motif (1). An autosomal homolog of DAZ, DAZL (DAZ-like), is specifically expressed in germ cells and is essential for the specification of the germ cell lineage during embryogenesis and during gametogenesis in adults of both sexes (2,3). DAZL may function by directly recruiting poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in order to activate silent mRNAs during germ cell development (2). Deletions encompassing the Y chromosomal DAZ genes are the most common molecularly defined cause of infertility in humans (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: The human DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia) gene family contains at least three members that encode RNA-binding proteins with a common RNA-recognition motif (1). An autosomal homolog of DAZ, DAZL (DAZ-like), is specifically expressed in germ cells and is essential for the specification of the germ cell lineage during embryogenesis and during gametogenesis in adults of both sexes (2,3). DAZL may function by directly recruiting poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in order to activate silent mRNAs during germ cell development (2). Deletions encompassing the Y chromosomal DAZ genes are the most common molecularly defined cause of infertility in humans (4,5).

$320
100 µg
This peptide is used to block Phospho-Histone H2A.X (Ser139) (20E3) Rabbit mAb #9718.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Histone H2A.X is a variant histone that represents approximately 10% of the total H2A histone proteins in normal human fibroblasts (1). H2A.X is required for checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest and DNA repair following double-stranded DNA breaks (1). DNA damage, caused by ionizing radiation, UV-light, or radiomimetic agents, results in rapid phosphorylation of H2A.X at Ser139 by PI3K-like kinases, including ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK (2,3). Within minutes following DNA damage, H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 at sites of DNA damage (4). This very early event in the DNA-damage response is required for recruitment of a multitude of DNA-damage response proteins, including MDC1, NBS1, RAD50, MRE11, 53BP1, and BRCA1 (1). In addition to its role in DNA-damage repair, H2A.X is required for DNA fragmentation during apoptosis and is phosphorylated by various kinases in response to apoptotic signals. H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 by DNA-PK in response to cell death receptor activation, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK1) in response to UV-A irradiation, and p38 MAPK in response to serum starvation (5-8). H2A.X is constitutively phosphorylated on Tyr142 in undamaged cells by WSTF (Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor) (9,10). Upon DNA damage, and concurrent with phosphorylation of Ser139, Tyr142 is dephosphorylated at sites of DNA damage by recruited EYA1 and EYA3 phosphatases (9). While phosphorylation at Ser139 facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and apoptotic proteins to sites of DNA damage, phosphorylation at Tyr142 appears to determine which set of proteins are recruited. Phosphorylation of H2A.X at Tyr142 inhibits the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and promotes binding of pro-apoptotic factors such as JNK1 (9). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing only mutant H2A.X Y142F, which favors recruitment of DNA repair proteins over apoptotic proteins, show a reduced apoptotic response to ionizing radiation (9). Thus, it appears that the balance of H2A.X Tyr142 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation provides a switch mechanism to determine cell fate after DNA damage.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Centrins are small conserved microtubule nucleating proteins localized to centrosomes, also known as microtubule organizing centers (MTOC), in eukaryotic cells. Centrin-1 is associated with cells that have cilia and flagella, whereas centrin-2 and -3 are ubiquitously expressed and important in centrosome duplication during cell division, as well as the structure and function of the MTOC (1-3). Human centrin-2 has also been shown to localize to nuclear pores and to have a role in regulation of mRNA export (4). The yeast ortholog of centrin-2, CDC31, plays a part in control of protein degradation and sensitivity to DNA damage (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch signaling is activated upon engagement of the Notch receptor with its ligands, the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) proteins of single-pass type I membrane proteins. The DSL proteins contain multiple EGF-like repeats and a DSL domain that is required for binding to Notch (1,2). Five DSL proteins have been identified in mammals: Jagged1, Jagged2, Delta-like (DLL) 1, 3 and 4 (3). Ligand binding to the Notch receptor results in two sequential proteolytic cleavages of the receptor by the ADAM protease and the γ-secretase complex. The intracellular domain of Notch is released and then translocates to the nucleus where it activates transcription. Notch ligands may also be processed in a way similar to Notch, suggesting a bi-directional signaling through receptor-ligand interactions (4-6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch signaling is activated upon engagement of the Notch receptor with its ligands, the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) proteins of single-pass type I membrane proteins. The DSL proteins contain multiple EGF-like repeats and a DSL domain that is required for binding to Notch (1,2). Five DSL proteins have been identified in mammals: Jagged1, Jagged2, Delta-like (DLL) 1, 3 and 4 (3). Ligand binding to the Notch receptor results in two sequential proteolytic cleavages of the receptor by the ADAM protease and the γ-secretase complex. The intracellular domain of Notch is released and then translocates to the nucleus where it activates transcription. Notch ligands may also be processed in a way similar to Notch, suggesting a bi-directional signaling through receptor-ligand interactions (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin is a family of large GTPases that has been implicated in the formation of vesicles of both the endocytotic and secretory processes (1). Dynamin plays an important role in the internalization of cell surface receptors, a process that attenuates the response to extracellular signals. It has been illustrated that dynamin interacts with signaling proteins such as Src, PLCγ, PKC and G-proteins. PKC and Src phosphorylate dynamin, and its phosphorylation may regulate the endocytosis of cell surface receptors (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GLI was first identified as a gene amplified in a malignant glioma (1) capable of transforming primary cells in cooperation with adenovirus E1A (2). GLI belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger proteins that includes three mammalian GLI proteins: GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3 (3). These GLI proteins are similar to the Drosophila homolog Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and function as transcription factors activated by the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in animal development, and research studies have shown that this pathway is aberrantly activated in many types of cancers (4,5).