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Human Spinal Cord Development

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GLI was first identified as a gene amplified in a malignant glioma (1) capable of transforming primary cells in cooperation with adenovirus E1A (2). GLI belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger proteins that includes three mammalian GLI proteins: GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3 (3). These GLI proteins are similar to the Drosophila homolog Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and function as transcription factors activated by the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in animal development, and research studies have shown that this pathway is aberrantly activated in many types of cancers (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SLIT2 is an extracellular matrix-associated SLIT family member that functions as a ligand for roundabout (ROBO) family receptors (1). Activation of ROBO receptors by SLIT2 regulates various biological processes, including promoting cellular senescence via WNT inhibition (2), suppressing migration by enhanced β-catenin/E-cadherin association, regulating actin polymerization (4, 5), and suppressing cell proliferation induced by SDF1 and MCP1 (6, 7). In development, the SLIT-ROBO pathways play important roles in neuronal axon guidance, angiogenesis, and both kidney and mammary gland organogenesis. SLIT2 expression has been reported to suppress cancer cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, suggesting that modulation of SLIT2-ROBO signaling may have therapeutic potential in cancer biology (8, 9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Reelin signaling pathway plays a critical role in neuronal development. Reelin is a secreted glycoprotein that binds to the lipoprotein receptors VLDLR and ApoER2 or alpha3beta1 integrin on the surface of neurons (1,2). Activation of these receptors induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Disabled 1 (Dab1), an intracellular adaptor. It is generally believed that tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 by Src family tyrosine kinases is the most critical downstream event in Reelin signaling. The phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain within its amino terminus enables Dab1 to recognize and bind to a conserved sequence motif within the cytoplasmic tail of the receptors. In addition, the PTB contains a Pleckstrin Homology-like subdomain that binds to phosphoinositides. The phosphoinositide-binding region within the Dab1 PTB domain is required for membrane localization and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 independent of VLDLR and ApoER2 (3). It has been demonstrated that Src, CrkII, CrkL and Dock1 associate with tyrosine-phosphorylated Dab. The CrkII-Dab1 interaction requires tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 at residues 220 or 232 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Reelin signaling pathway plays a critical role in neuronal development. Reelin is a secreted glycoprotein that binds to the lipoprotein receptors VLDLR and ApoER2 or alpha3beta1 integrin on the surface of neurons (1,2). Activation of these receptors induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Disabled 1 (Dab1), an intracellular adaptor. It is generally believed that tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 by Src family tyrosine kinases is the most critical downstream event in Reelin signaling. The phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain within its amino terminus enables Dab1 to recognize and bind to a conserved sequence motif within the cytoplasmic tail of the receptors. In addition, the PTB contains a Pleckstrin Homology-like subdomain that binds to phosphoinositides. The phosphoinositide-binding region within the Dab1 PTB domain is required for membrane localization and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 independent of VLDLR and ApoER2 (3). It has been demonstrated that Src, CrkII, CrkL and Dock1 associate with tyrosine-phosphorylated Dab. The CrkII-Dab1 interaction requires tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 at residues 220 or 232 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AKAPs (A-kinase anchoring proteins), as their name implies, are a family of scaffolding proteins that bind regulatory subunits of Protein Kinase A (PKA) thus localizing PKA activity to distinct regions of the cell (1). Beyond a common amphipathic alpha helix that is responsible for recruiting the PKA regulatory subunit (RIα, RIIα, RIβ, or RIIβ), individual AKAPs contain additional domains responsible for the recrutiment of additional signaling proteins (phosphodiesterases, phosphatases, cytoskeletal components, other kinase, etc.) or restricting AKAP to a specific subcellular location (1). AKAP5 (also known as P75, AKAP75, or AKAP79) is predominantly expressed in neuronal tissues and cells where it serves to localize type II PKA to post-synaptic densities (2-4). AKAP5 specifically binds to the regulatory subunit of PKAIIβ, anchoring the enzyme to the plasma membrane and sites of cytoskeletal/membrane junctions (4-5). The other binding domains of AKAP5 have been shown to interact with calmodulin, PP2B, and calcineurin suggesting that AKAP5 may act to coordinate the cAMP- and Ca2+-sensing pathways in various cell types (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (CRMP-2) is expressed at high levels in the developing nervous system and plays a critical role in axonal outgrowth by specifying axon/dendrite fate and establishing neuronal polarity (1,2). CRMP-2 enhances axon elongation and branching by binding to tubulin heterodimers to promote microtubule assembly (3). GSK-3β inactivates CRMP-2 by phosphorylating it at Thr514. CRMP-2 is primed following phosphorylation at Ser522 by CDK5 and at Thr518 by GSK-3β (2). Phosphorylation of CRMP-2, which decreases tubulin binding ability, can be inhibited by NT-3 and BDNF through the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway (2). CRMP-2 also mediates semaphorin-induced growth cone collapse (4). Hyperphosphorylation of CRMP-2 is found in Alzheimer disease plaques with concurrent elevated GSK-3β activity in these patients (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: XPB and XPD are ATPase/helicase subunits of the TFIIH complex that are involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) to remove lesions and photoproducts generated by UV light (1). XPB and XPD are 3’-5’ and 5’-3’ DNA helicases, respectively, that play a role in opening of the DNA damage site to facilitate repair (2,3). XPB and XPD both play an important role in maintaining genomic stability, and researchers have linked mutations of these proteins to Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Trichothiodystrophy (TTD). XP patients have abnormalities in skin pigmentation and are highly susceptible to skin cancers, while TTD patients exhibit symptoms such as brittle hair, neurological abnormalities, and mild photosensitivity (4). In addition to their role in NER, XPB and XPD are involved in transcription initiation as part of the TFIIH core complex (5). The helicase activity of XPB unwinds DNA around the transcription start site to facilitate RNA polymerase II promoter clearance and initiation of transcription (6). XPD plays a structural role linking core TFIIH components with the cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex that phosphorylates the C-terminus of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, leading to transcription initiation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian cells synthesize serine de novo by diverting a portion of the glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into the phosphorylated pathway of serine synthesis. This shift supports anabolism by providing precursors for the biosynthesis of proteins, nucleotides, creatine, porphyrins, phospholipids, and glutathione. Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) catalyzes the first step in the serine biosynthesis pathway by converting 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxy pyruvate (1).Research studies demonstrate that an increase in serine biosynthesis supports growth and proliferation of cancer cells (2-4), which is supported by amplification and overexpression of PHGDH in a subset of melanoma and breast cancers (5,6). Suppression of PHGDH expression in cell lines with elevated PHGDH levels causes a strong decrease in cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in vivo (5). Additional evidence suggests that PHGDH interacts with and stabilizes FoxM1, which promotes the proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenicity of glioma cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Mammalian cells synthesize serine de novo by diverting a portion of the glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into the phosphorylated pathway of serine synthesis. This shift supports anabolism by providing precursors for the biosynthesis of proteins, nucleotides, creatine, porphyrins, phospholipids, and glutathione. Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) catalyzes the first step in the serine biosynthesis pathway by converting 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxy pyruvate (1).Research studies demonstrate that an increase in serine biosynthesis supports growth and proliferation of cancer cells (2-4), which is supported by amplification and overexpression of PHGDH in a subset of melanoma and breast cancers (5,6). Suppression of PHGDH expression in cell lines with elevated PHGDH levels causes a strong decrease in cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in vivo (5). Additional evidence suggests that PHGDH interacts with and stabilizes FoxM1, which promotes the proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenicity of glioma cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (CRMP-2) is expressed at high levels in the developing nervous system and plays a critical role in axonal outgrowth by specifying axon/dendrite fate and establishing neuronal polarity (1,2). CRMP-2 enhances axon elongation and branching by binding to tubulin heterodimers to promote microtubule assembly (3). GSK-3β inactivates CRMP-2 by phosphorylating it at Thr514. CRMP-2 is primed following phosphorylation at Ser522 by CDK5 and at Thr518 by GSK-3β (2). Phosphorylation of CRMP-2, which decreases tubulin binding ability, can be inhibited by NT-3 and BDNF through the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway (2). CRMP-2 also mediates semaphorin-induced growth cone collapse (4). Hyperphosphorylation of CRMP-2 is found in Alzheimer disease plaques with concurrent elevated GSK-3β activity in these patients (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The zinc finger protein ZPR1 (ZNF259) binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and is localized to both cytoplasm and nucleus. The zinc fingers found in ZPR1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR mediate the interaction between ZPR1 and the receptor (1). ZPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm to nucleus following mitogen (i.e. EGF) stimulation (2,3). ZPR1 also interacts with translation elongation factor eEF1A in vivo following EGF treatment (3). The interaction between the zinc finger protein and elongation factor is important for cell proliferation. Cells lacking ZPR1 exhibit abnormal nucleolar function, suggesting that ZPR1 is required for cell viability and nucleolar function in dividing cells (3). ZPR1 knockout mice exhibit significant neurodegeneration, and reduced or altered expression of ZPR1 may contribute to spinal muscular atrophy, a disorder characterized by degeneration of spinal cord neurons (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Reelin signaling pathway plays a critical role in neuronal development. Reelin is a secreted glycoprotein that binds to the lipoprotein receptors VLDLR and ApoER2 or alpha3beta1 integrin on the surface of neurons (1,2). Activation of these receptors induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Disabled 1 (Dab1), an intracellular adaptor. It is generally believed that tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 by Src family tyrosine kinases is the most critical downstream event in Reelin signaling. The phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain within its amino terminus enables Dab1 to recognize and bind to a conserved sequence motif within the cytoplasmic tail of the receptors. In addition, the PTB contains a Pleckstrin Homology-like subdomain that binds to phosphoinositides. The phosphoinositide-binding region within the Dab1 PTB domain is required for membrane localization and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 independent of VLDLR and ApoER2 (3). It has been demonstrated that Src, CrkII, CrkL and Dock1 associate with tyrosine-phosphorylated Dab. The CrkII-Dab1 interaction requires tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1 at residues 220 or 232 (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (CRMP-2) is expressed at high levels in the developing nervous system and plays a critical role in axonal outgrowth by specifying axon/dendrite fate and establishing neuronal polarity (1,2). CRMP-2 enhances axon elongation and branching by binding to tubulin heterodimers to promote microtubule assembly (3). GSK-3β inactivates CRMP-2 by phosphorylating it at Thr514. CRMP-2 is primed following phosphorylation at Ser522 by CDK5 and at Thr518 by GSK-3β (2). Phosphorylation of CRMP-2, which decreases tubulin binding ability, can be inhibited by NT-3 and BDNF through the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway (2). CRMP-2 also mediates semaphorin-induced growth cone collapse (4). Hyperphosphorylation of CRMP-2 is found in Alzheimer disease plaques with concurrent elevated GSK-3β activity in these patients (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neurofibromin is a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (RasGAP), down-regulating Ras signaling (1). Studies have shown, that mutations in NF1 inhibit its activity, resulting in benign tumors such as neurofibromas, which may form along nerves throughout the body resulting in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) (2). NF1 is one of the most common autosomal dominant diseases however it remains unclear how mutation of NF1 may lead to other features of NF1 (3). In addition, NF1 mutations occur in 5-10% of human sporadic malignancies such as glioblastomas, lung adenocarcinomas, melanomas, breast and ovarian cancers, and acute myeloid leukemias. Mutations in NF1 can cause resistance to therapies including chemotherapy and radiation therapy (3).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1) is a transcription factor known for its roles in organ development and lymphangiogenesis. It plays a critical role in the development of the CNS, lens, retina, liver, pancreas, and heart, and is considered to be the master regulator of the lymphatic system (1,2). PROX1 initiates the differentiation of lymphatic vasculature from the cardinal vein, where it is regulated by Sox18 (3,4). The PROX1 suppressor COUP-TFII represses the Notch pathway in venous endothelium, which prevents arterialization (4). HIF-1α and HIF-1β mediated hypoxia induces PROX1, which suggests a means of promoting lymphangiogenesis. Since the tumor microenvironment is typically hypoxic, regulation of PROX1 by hypoxia may also explain the up-regulation of this transcription factor in some cancers (2). PROX1 promotes colon cancer progression by down-regulating E-cadherin via miR-9, which promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis (5). The PROX1 protein can act as a tumor suppressor in cases of hepatocellular carcinoma. PROX1 represses transcription of TWIST1, a transcription factor that promotes metastasis by binding the E-cadherin promoter. The function of PROX1 in other cancers is an area of active research (6).