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Human Spindle Localization

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Importins belong to the karyopherin family of nuclear transport proteins (1) and are divided into two subgroups: importin α and importin β. Importins mainly function in nuclear protein import and export (2,3). Importin β1 (also known as karyopherin β1, Kpnβ1, Kpnb1, or p97) plays a key role in the nuclear import process (1-3). Nuclear import via importin β1 association with adaptor importin α (also known as karyopherin α, or Kpnα) is an essential component of the classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) pathway (4). Importin α directly recognizes the NLS present in the cargo target, prompting complex formation with importin β1. The cargo:importin α:importin β1 complex is transported across the nuclear pore complex (NPC) into the nucleus, where it is dissociated by the binding of RanGTP (1-4). Nuclear import directly via importin β1 can also occur by importin β1 recognition of the cargo protein, bypassing importin α involvement. In both cases, the importin β1/target protein interaction is mediated through the binding of importin β1 HEAT repeats with the target protein sequences (either the cargo protein itself or importin α) (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Importins belong to the karyopherin family of nuclear transport proteins (1) and are divided into two subgroups: importin α and importin β. Importins mainly function in nuclear protein import and export (2,3). Importin β1 (also known as karyopherin β1, Kpnβ1, Kpnb1, or p97) plays a key role in the nuclear import process (1-3). Nuclear import via importin β1 association with adaptor importin α (also known as karyopherin α, or Kpnα) is an essential component of the classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) pathway (4). Importin α directly recognizes the NLS present in the cargo target, prompting complex formation with importin β1. The cargo:importin α:importin β1 complex is transported across the nuclear pore complex (NPC) into the nucleus, where it is dissociated by the binding of RanGTP (1-4). Nuclear import directly via importin β1 can also occur by importin β1 recognition of the cargo protein, bypassing importin α involvement. In both cases, the importin β1/target protein interaction is mediated through the binding of importin β1 HEAT repeats with the target protein sequences (either the cargo protein itself or importin α) (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin nucleation, the formation of new actin filaments from existing filaments, affects actin filament structure during cell motility, division, and intracellular trafficking. An important actin nucleation protein complex is the highly conserved ARP2/3 complex, consisting of ARP2, ARP3, and ARPC1-5. The ARP2/3 complex promotes branching of an existing actin filament and formation of a daughter filament following activation by nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASP/WAVE or cortactin (1). The formation of podosomes, small cellular projections that degrade the extracellular matrix, is enhanced by ARP2/3 complex action. ARP2/3 competes with caldesmon, an actin binding protein shown to negatively affect podosome formation (2). Along with N-WASP, the ARP2/3 complex regulates nuclear actin filament nucleation and controls actin polymerization during transcription (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin nucleation, the formation of new actin filaments from existing filaments, affects actin filament structure during cell motility, division, and intracellular trafficking. An important actin nucleation protein complex is the highly conserved ARP2/3 complex, consisting of ARP2, ARP3, and ARPC1-5. The ARP2/3 complex promotes branching of an existing actin filament and formation of a daughter filament following activation by nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASP/WAVE or cortactin (1). The formation of podosomes, small cellular projections that degrade the extracellular matrix, is enhanced by ARP2/3 complex action. ARP2/3 competes with caldesmon, an actin binding protein shown to negatively affect podosome formation (2). Along with N-WASP, the ARP2/3 complex regulates nuclear actin filament nucleation and controls actin polymerization during transcription (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin nucleation, the formation of new actin filaments from existing filaments, affects actin filament structure during cell motility, division, and intracellular trafficking. An important actin nucleation protein complex is the highly conserved ARP2/3 complex, consisting of ARP2, ARP3, and ARPC1-5. The ARP2/3 complex promotes branching of an existing actin filament and formation of a daughter filament following activation by nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASP/WAVE or cortactin (1). The formation of podosomes, small cellular projections that degrade the extracellular matrix, is enhanced by ARP2/3 complex action. ARP2/3 competes with caldesmon, an actin binding protein shown to negatively affect podosome formation (2). Along with N-WASP, the ARP2/3 complex regulates nuclear actin filament nucleation and controls actin polymerization during transcription (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Aurora A (Thr288)/Aurora B (Thr232)/Aurora C (Thr198) (D13A11) XP® Rabbit mAb #2914.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Aurora A (Thr288)/Aurora B (Thr232)/Aurora C (Thr198) (D13A11) XP® Rabbit mAb  #2914.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Survivin is a 16 kDa anti-apoptotic protein highly expressed during fetal development and cancer cell malignancy (1). Survivin binds and inhibits caspase-3, controlling the checkpoint in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and promoting cell division (2,3). This regulatory process requires the phosphorylation of survivin at Thr34 by p34 cdc2 kinase (4). Gene targeting using a Thr34 phosphorylation-defective survivin mutant, as well as antisense survivin, have been shown to inhibit tumor growth (5,6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells.The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Survivin (71G4B7) Rabbit mAb #2808.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Survivin is a 16 kDa anti-apoptotic protein highly expressed during fetal development and cancer cell malignancy (1). Survivin binds and inhibits caspase-3, controlling the checkpoint in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and promoting cell division (2,3). This regulatory process requires the phosphorylation of survivin at Thr34 by p34 cdc2 kinase (4). Gene targeting using a Thr34 phosphorylation-defective survivin mutant, as well as antisense survivin, have been shown to inhibit tumor growth (5,6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Survivin siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit survivin expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Survivin is a 16 kDa anti-apoptotic protein highly expressed during fetal development and cancer cell malignancy (1). Survivin binds and inhibits caspase-3, controlling the checkpoint in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and promoting cell division (2,3). This regulatory process requires the phosphorylation of survivin at Thr34 by p34 cdc2 kinase (4). Gene targeting using a Thr34 phosphorylation-defective survivin mutant, as well as antisense survivin, have been shown to inhibit tumor growth (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Survivin is a 16 kDa anti-apoptotic protein highly expressed during fetal development and cancer cell malignancy (1). Survivin binds and inhibits caspase-3, controlling the checkpoint in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and promoting cell division (2,3). This regulatory process requires the phosphorylation of survivin at Thr34 by p34 cdc2 kinase (4). Gene targeting using a Thr34 phosphorylation-defective survivin mutant, as well as antisense survivin, have been shown to inhibit tumor growth (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Aurora A (AIK) is a cell cycle-regulated Ser/Thr protein kinase that is overexpressed in many tumor cell lines (1-3). Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 within the kinase activation loop results in a significant increase in its activity and may target the protein for proteasomal degradation during mitosis (4). The closely-related kinase Aurora B (AIM1) has been implicated in multiple mitotic events (5), and siRNA silencing of Aurora B expression results in reduced histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromosome alignment/segregation, and altered survivin localization (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Aurora A (AIK) is a cell cycle-regulated Ser/Thr protein kinase that is overexpressed in many tumor cell lines (1-3). Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 within the kinase activation loop results in a significant increase in its activity and may target the protein for proteasomal degradation during mitosis (4). The closely-related kinase Aurora B (AIM1) has been implicated in multiple mitotic events (5), and siRNA silencing of Aurora B expression results in reduced histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromosome alignment/segregation, and altered survivin localization (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Aurora A (AIK) is a cell cycle-regulated Ser/Thr protein kinase that is overexpressed in many tumor cell lines (1-3). Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 within the kinase activation loop results in a significant increase in its activity and may target the protein for proteasomal degradation during mitosis (4). The closely-related kinase Aurora B (AIM1) has been implicated in multiple mitotic events (5), and siRNA silencing of Aurora B expression results in reduced histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromosome alignment/segregation, and altered survivin localization (6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Aurora A (D3E4Q) Rabbit mAb #14475.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Aurora A (AIK) is a cell cycle-regulated Ser/Thr protein kinase that is overexpressed in many tumor cell lines (1-3). Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 within the kinase activation loop results in a significant increase in its activity and may target the protein for proteasomal degradation during mitosis (4). The closely-related kinase Aurora B (AIM1) has been implicated in multiple mitotic events (5), and siRNA silencing of Aurora B expression results in reduced histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromosome alignment/segregation, and altered survivin localization (6).