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Human Triacylglycerol Transport

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Proteins in the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex are integral membrane proteins involved in vesicle transport and membrane fusion that pair vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) with cognate target SNARE (t-SNARE) proteins (reviewed in 1,2). Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7), or tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP), is a widely expressed v-SNARE involved in exocytosis of granules and synaptic vesicles in various cell types, membrane remodeling, neurite outgrowth, lysosomal secretion, and autophagosome maturation (3). Activity of VAMP7 can be regulated by c-Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates VAMP7-mediated exocytosis (4). VAMP7 activity can also be regulated through interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Varp (5,6). Several research studies indicate that VAMP7 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth as well as potential neurological activities, including anxiety (7-9). VAMP7 also appears to have a key role in T-cell activation by facilitating the recruitment of vesicular Lat to the immunological synapse (10). The VAMP7 protein interacts with ATG16L, a component of the ATG5-ATG12 complex, and regulates autophagosome maturation through homotypic fusion of ATG16L1 vesicles (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Proteins in the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex are integral membrane proteins involved in vesicle transport and membrane fusion that pair vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) with cognate target SNARE (t-SNARE) proteins (reviewed in 1,2). Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7), or tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP), is a widely expressed v-SNARE involved in exocytosis of granules and synaptic vesicles in various cell types, membrane remodeling, neurite outgrowth, lysosomal secretion, and autophagosome maturation (3). Activity of VAMP7 can be regulated by c-Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates VAMP7-mediated exocytosis (4). VAMP7 activity can also be regulated through interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Varp (5,6). Several research studies indicate that VAMP7 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth as well as potential neurological activities, including anxiety (7-9). VAMP7 also appears to have a key role in T-cell activation by facilitating the recruitment of vesicular Lat to the immunological synapse (10). The VAMP7 protein interacts with ATG16L, a component of the ATG5-ATG12 complex, and regulates autophagosome maturation through homotypic fusion of ATG16L1 vesicles (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ApoAI (Apolipoprotein A1) is a major component of high density lipoprotein (HDL, the “good cholesterol”) in plasma. It is produced in the liver and small intestine. ApoA1 is a cofactor for lecithin cholesterolacyltransferase (LCAT) that is responsible for the formation of plasma cholesteryl esters and promotes cholesterol efflux from tissues to the liver for excretion. Defects in ApoA1 are associated with high density lipoprotein deficiency (HDLD) and systemic non-neuropathic amyloidosis (1-3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$262
50-100 transfections
300 µl
SignalSilence® PKA C-α siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PKA C-α expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PKA C-α siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PKA C-α expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) bind to fatty acids and other lipids to function as cytoplasmic lipid chaperones (1). They participate in the transport of fatty acids and other lipids to various cellular pathways (2). The predominant fatty acid binding protein found in adipocytes is FABP4, also called adipocyte fatty acid binding protein or aP2. FABP4 is also expressed in macrophages (3). FABP4 knockout mice fed a high-fat and high-calorie diet become obese but develop neither insulin resistance nor diabetes, suggesting that this protein might be a link between obesity and insulin resistance and diabetes (4). Mice deficient in both FABP4 and ApoE show protection against atherosclerosis when compared with mice deficient only in ApoE (3). Mice carrying a FABP4 genetic variant exhibit both reduced FABP4 expression and a reduced potential for developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. A related study in humans indicated a similar pattern, suggesting that FABP4 may be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders (1).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total Caveolin-1 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of total Caveolin-1 protein. A Caveolin-1 Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, Caveolin-1 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, Caveolin-1 Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect the captured Caveolin-1 protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of total Caveolin-1 protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase-phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) is a single-pass, type II transmembrane protein primarily involved in ATP hydrolysis at the plasma membrane. Targeting of ENPP1 to the basolateral cell surface relies on the presence of a carboxy-terminal di-leucine-based signal (1). ENPP1 plays important roles in bone mineralization and soft tissue calcification (2-5). Mutations in the corresponding ENPP1 gene cause generalized arterial calcification in infancy (GACI) and idiopathic infantile arterial calcification (IIAC) (6,7). ENPP1 inhibits insulin receptor function and overexpression of this enzyme causes insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in mice (8,9). Genetic variants of ENPP1 have been associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) bind to fatty acids and other lipids to function as cytoplasmic lipid chaperones (1). They participate in the transport of fatty acids and other lipids to various cellular pathways (2). The predominant fatty acid binding protein found in adipocytes is FABP4, also called adipocyte fatty acid binding protein or aP2. FABP4 is also expressed in macrophages (3). FABP4 knockout mice fed a high-fat and high-calorie diet become obese but develop neither insulin resistance nor diabetes, suggesting that this protein might be a link between obesity and insulin resistance and diabetes (4). Mice deficient in both FABP4 and ApoE show protection against atherosclerosis when compared with mice deficient only in ApoE (3). Mice carrying a FABP4 genetic variant exhibit both reduced FABP4 expression and a reduced potential for developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. A related study in humans indicated a similar pattern, suggesting that FABP4 may be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders (1).