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Human Trophectodermal Cell Differentiation

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex regulates mRNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells (1). This regulation occurs at different levels of mRNA synthesis and degradation, including transcription initiation, elongation, deadenylation, and degradation (1). Multiple components, including CNOT1, CNOT2, CNOT3, CNOT4, CNOT6, CNOT6L, CNOT7, CNOT8, CNOT9, and CNOT10 have been identified in this complex (2). In addition, subunit composition of this complex has been shown to vary among different tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex regulates mRNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells (1). This regulation occurs at different levels of mRNA synthesis and degradation, including transcription initiation, elongation, deadenylation, and degradation (1). Multiple components, including CNOT1, CNOT2, CNOT3, CNOT4, CNOT6, CNOT6L, CNOT7, CNOT8, CNOT9, and CNOT10 have been identified in this complex (2). In addition, subunit composition of this complex has been shown to vary among different tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex regulates mRNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells (1). This regulation occurs at different levels of mRNA synthesis and degradation, including transcription initiation, elongation, deadenylation, and degradation (1). Multiple components, including CNOT1, CNOT2, CNOT3, CNOT4, CNOT6, CNOT6L, CNOT7, CNOT8, CNOT9, and CNOT10 have been identified in this complex (2). In addition, subunit composition of this complex has been shown to vary among different tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Specificity protein 1 (SP1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor belonging to the family of C2H2-type zinc finger containing DNA-binding proteins. SP1 binds GC-rich motifs with high affinity and regulates the expression of numerous mammalian genes (1,2). It interacts with many other transcription factors, such as c-Myc, EGR1, and Stat1, and with basal transcription machinery components. SP1 interacts with chromatin-modifying factors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 in chromatin remodeling. Transcriptional activity and stability of SP1 are regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and glycosylation (3). Glycosylation of SP1 following insulin treatment leads to increased nuclear localization, while glucagon treatment increases cytoplasmic SP1 levels (4-6). Investigators have found high levels of SP1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Specificity protein 1 (SP1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor belonging to the family of C2H2-type zinc finger containing DNA-binding proteins. SP1 binds GC-rich motifs with high affinity and regulates the expression of numerous mammalian genes (1,2). It interacts with many other transcription factors, such as c-Myc, EGR1, and Stat1, and with basal transcription machinery components. SP1 interacts with chromatin-modifying factors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 in chromatin remodeling. Transcriptional activity and stability of SP1 are regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and glycosylation (3). Glycosylation of SP1 following insulin treatment leads to increased nuclear localization, while glucagon treatment increases cytoplasmic SP1 levels (4-6). Investigators have found high levels of SP1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® SP1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit SP1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Specificity protein 1 (SP1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor belonging to the family of C2H2-type zinc finger containing DNA-binding proteins. SP1 binds GC-rich motifs with high affinity and regulates the expression of numerous mammalian genes (1,2). It interacts with many other transcription factors, such as c-Myc, EGR1, and Stat1, and with basal transcription machinery components. SP1 interacts with chromatin-modifying factors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 in chromatin remodeling. Transcriptional activity and stability of SP1 are regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and glycosylation (3). Glycosylation of SP1 following insulin treatment leads to increased nuclear localization, while glucagon treatment increases cytoplasmic SP1 levels (4-6). Investigators have found high levels of SP1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® SP1 siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit SP1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Specificity protein 1 (SP1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor belonging to the family of C2H2-type zinc finger containing DNA-binding proteins. SP1 binds GC-rich motifs with high affinity and regulates the expression of numerous mammalian genes (1,2). It interacts with many other transcription factors, such as c-Myc, EGR1, and Stat1, and with basal transcription machinery components. SP1 interacts with chromatin-modifying factors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 in chromatin remodeling. Transcriptional activity and stability of SP1 are regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and glycosylation (3). Glycosylation of SP1 following insulin treatment leads to increased nuclear localization, while glucagon treatment increases cytoplasmic SP1 levels (4-6). Investigators have found high levels of SP1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated SP1 (D4C3) Rabbit mAb #9389.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Specificity protein 1 (SP1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor belonging to the family of C2H2-type zinc finger containing DNA-binding proteins. SP1 binds GC-rich motifs with high affinity and regulates the expression of numerous mammalian genes (1,2). It interacts with many other transcription factors, such as c-Myc, EGR1, and Stat1, and with basal transcription machinery components. SP1 interacts with chromatin-modifying factors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 in chromatin remodeling. Transcriptional activity and stability of SP1 are regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and glycosylation (3). Glycosylation of SP1 following insulin treatment leads to increased nuclear localization, while glucagon treatment increases cytoplasmic SP1 levels (4-6). Investigators have found high levels of SP1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (7).

$260
100 µl
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The T-box family of transcription factors is named for their shared homology with the DNA binding domain of the mouse brachyury (T) gene product. Members of this family bind DNA and are capable of transcriptional activation. They also have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and roles in embryonic development, primarily mesoderm development (1). EOMES, or Tbr2 (T-box brain 2), is a master regulator of mesoderm formation that is also essential for trophoblast formation, gastrulation, neurogenesis and the differentiation of certain T cell subsets. Embryos from EOMES knock-out mice die soon after implantation due to their inability to develop a trophoblast (2,3). Conditional neural knock out mice show defects in development of a specific population of neural progenators known as Intermediate Progenator Cells (IPCs) that give rise only to neurons (4,5). These cells are formed from the radial glia in the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones of the cortex. Expression of EOMES increases as cells develop from radial glia to IPCs and then decreases as IPCs progress to neurons. Recent evidence suggests that EOMES and IPCs may also play a role neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal SGZ (5). EOMES is also a key transcription factor for memory T cells and for full effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells (6). Expression of EOMES is induced in CD8+ T cells following viral infection and bacterial infection where sufficient IL-12 has been produced to elicit acute host cell response (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CDX2, a homeobox domain-containing transcription factor, is a master regulator of the trophoectoderm, the layer that gives rise to extra-embryonic tissues in mammalian development (1). CDX2 is also involved in intestinal development (2), and gain of expression or loss of expression has been associated with various human malignancies such as Barret Esophagus (3) and colorectal cancer (4,5). Mouse embryonic stem cells deficient in CDX2 display limited hematopoietic progenitor development and altered Hox gene expression (6), pointing to a role for CDX2 in Hox gene regulation. CDX2 is also implicated in the aberrant expression of Hox genes in human AML cell lines (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The PAF (RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) associated factor) complex was initially identified in yeast and is comprised of subunits PAF1, Leo1, Ctr9, Cdc73, RTF1 and Ski8 (1,2). The PAF complex plays an important role in transcription initiation and elongation by RNAPII by regulating the establishment of proper histone modifications such as histone H2B ubiquitination and the recruitment of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) (3-5). The PAF complex also plays a role in mRNA processing and maturation by interacting with and recruiting the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor and cleavage stimulation factor complexes via the Cdc73 subunit (6,7). In addition, the Ski8 subunit of the PAF complex is part of the hSKi complex that regulates RNA surveillance, suggesting an important function of the complex in coordinating events associated with proper RNA maturation during transcription (1,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EOMES (D8D1R) Rabbit mAb #81493.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The T-box family of transcription factors is named for their shared homology with the DNA binding domain of the mouse brachyury (T) gene product. Members of this family bind DNA and are capable of transcriptional activation. They also have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and roles in embryonic development, primarily mesoderm development (1). EOMES, or Tbr2 (T-box brain 2), is a master regulator of mesoderm formation that is also essential for trophoblast formation, gastrulation, neurogenesis and the differentiation of certain T cell subsets. Embryos from EOMES knock-out mice die soon after implantation due to their inability to develop a trophoblast (2,3). Conditional neural knock out mice show defects in development of a specific population of neural progenators known as Intermediate Progenator Cells (IPCs) that give rise only to neurons (4,5). These cells are formed from the radial glia in the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones of the cortex. Expression of EOMES increases as cells develop from radial glia to IPCs and then decreases as IPCs progress to neurons. Recent evidence suggests that EOMES and IPCs may also play a role neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal SGZ (5). EOMES is also a key transcription factor for memory T cells and for full effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells (6). Expression of EOMES is induced in CD8+ T cells following viral infection and bacterial infection where sufficient IL-12 has been produced to elicit acute host cell response (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The T-box family of transcription factors is named for their shared homology with the DNA binding domain of the mouse brachyury (T) gene product. Members of this family bind DNA and are capable of transcriptional activation. They also have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and roles in embryonic development, primarily mesoderm development (1). EOMES, or Tbr2 (T-box brain 2), is a master regulator of mesoderm formation that is also essential for trophoblast formation, gastrulation, neurogenesis and the differentiation of certain T cell subsets. Embryos from EOMES knock-out mice die soon after implantation due to their inability to develop a trophoblast (2,3). Conditional neural knock out mice show defects in development of a specific population of neural progenators known as Intermediate Progenator Cells (IPCs) that give rise only to neurons (4,5). These cells are formed from the radial glia in the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones of the cortex. Expression of EOMES increases as cells develop from radial glia to IPCs and then decreases as IPCs progress to neurons. Recent evidence suggests that EOMES and IPCs may also play a role neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal SGZ (5). EOMES is also a key transcription factor for memory T cells and for full effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells (6). Expression of EOMES is induced in CD8+ T cells following viral infection and bacterial infection where sufficient IL-12 has been produced to elicit acute host cell response (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EOMES (D8D1R) Rabbit mAb #81493.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The T-box family of transcription factors is named for their shared homology with the DNA binding domain of the mouse brachyury (T) gene product. Members of this family bind DNA and are capable of transcriptional activation. They also have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and roles in embryonic development, primarily mesoderm development (1). EOMES, or Tbr2 (T-box brain 2), is a master regulator of mesoderm formation that is also essential for trophoblast formation, gastrulation, neurogenesis and the differentiation of certain T cell subsets. Embryos from EOMES knock-out mice die soon after implantation due to their inability to develop a trophoblast (2,3). Conditional neural knock out mice show defects in development of a specific population of neural progenators known as Intermediate Progenator Cells (IPCs) that give rise only to neurons (4,5). These cells are formed from the radial glia in the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones of the cortex. Expression of EOMES increases as cells develop from radial glia to IPCs and then decreases as IPCs progress to neurons. Recent evidence suggests that EOMES and IPCs may also play a role neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal SGZ (5). EOMES is also a key transcription factor for memory T cells and for full effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells (6). Expression of EOMES is induced in CD8+ T cells following viral infection and bacterial infection where sufficient IL-12 has been produced to elicit acute host cell response (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The T-box family of transcription factors is named for their shared homology with the DNA binding domain of the mouse brachyury (T) gene product. Members of this family bind DNA and are capable of transcriptional activation. They also have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and roles in embryonic development, primarily mesoderm development (1). EOMES, or Tbr2 (T-box brain 2), is a master regulator of mesoderm formation that is also essential for trophoblast formation, gastrulation, neurogenesis and the differentiation of certain T cell subsets. Embryos from EOMES knock-out mice die soon after implantation due to their inability to develop a trophoblast (2,3). Conditional neural knock out mice show defects in development of a specific population of neural progenators known as Intermediate Progenator Cells (IPCs) that give rise only to neurons (4,5). These cells are formed from the radial glia in the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones of the cortex. Expression of EOMES increases as cells develop from radial glia to IPCs and then decreases as IPCs progress to neurons. Recent evidence suggests that EOMES and IPCs may also play a role neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal SGZ (5). EOMES is also a key transcription factor for memory T cells and for full effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells (6). Expression of EOMES is induced in CD8+ T cells following viral infection and bacterial infection where sufficient IL-12 has been produced to elicit acute host cell response (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FoxD3 is a member of the Forkhead Box family and is characterized by a winged-helix DNA-binding structure and the important role it plays in embryonic development (1). This transcriptional regulator is required for the maintenance of pluripotency in the pre-implantation and peri-implantation stages of mouse embryonic development (2) and is also required for trophoblast formation (3). FoxD3 is required for the maintenance of the mammalian neural crest; FoxD3(-/-) mouse embryos fail around the time of implantation with loss of neural crest-derived structures (4). FoxD3 also forms a regulatory network with Oct-4 and NANOG to maintain the pluripotency of ES cells (5,6).