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Monkey Oxidoreductase Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TRXR1 (thioredoxin reductase 1) is a selenocysteine-containing protein that is involved in redox homeostasis (1-6). Its canonical target is thioredoxin, another redox protein (1). Together, they are involved in many functions such as antioxidant regulation (3-6), cell proliferation (2,3,5), DNA replication (2,3), and transcription (3,5). TRXR1 is also capable of reducing a wide array of cellular proteins (1,3). Selenium deficiency, either by diet modification (2,6) or introduction of methylmercury (4), hinders proper expression and function of TRXR1. It is possible that this effect, which results in a higher oxidative state, is a result of the selenocysteine codon (UGA) being read as a STOP codon in the absence of adequate selenium (4). The functions of TRXR1 in cell proliferation and antioxidant defense make it a potential therapeutic target.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: TRXR1 (thioredoxin reductase 1) is a selenocysteine-containing protein that is involved in redox homeostasis (1-6). Its canonical target is thioredoxin, another redox protein (1). Together, they are involved in many functions such as antioxidant regulation (3-6), cell proliferation (2,3,5), DNA replication (2,3), and transcription (3,5). TRXR1 is also capable of reducing a wide array of cellular proteins (1,3). Selenium deficiency, either by diet modification (2,6) or introduction of methylmercury (4), hinders proper expression and function of TRXR1. It is possible that this effect, which results in a higher oxidative state, is a result of the selenocysteine codon (UGA) being read as a STOP codon in the absence of adequate selenium (4). The functions of TRXR1 in cell proliferation and antioxidant defense make it a potential therapeutic target.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) is one of three enzymes in the α ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) that is responsible for catalyzing a rate-regulating step of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Together with dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), OGDH helps to convert 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl-CoA and CO2 within eukaryotic mitochondria (1). Regulation of this enzyme complex is important for mitochondrial energy metabolism within cells (2). Research studies indicate that OGDH activity within the mitochondrial matrix is regulated by multiple factors, including calcium, the adenine nucleotides ATP and ADP, and NADH (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FIH (Factor inhibiting HIF-1, HIF asparagine hydroxylase) is a dioxygen-dependent asparaginyl hydroxylase that modifies target protein function by hydroxylating target protein asparagine residues (1-3). Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a transcriptional activator involved in control of cell cycle in response to hypoxic conditions, is an important target for FIH regulation. FIH functions as an oxygen sensor that regulates HIF function by hydroxylating at Asn803 in the carboxy-terminal transactivation domain (CAD) of HIF (4,5). During normoxia, FIH uses cellular oxygen to hydroxylate HIF-1 and prevent interaction of HIF-1 with transcriptional coactivators, including the CBP/p300-interacting transactivator. Under hypoxic conditions, FIH remains inactive and does not inhibit HIF, allowing the activator to regulate transcription of genes in response to low oxygen conditions (4-6). FIH activity is regulated in through interaction with proteins, including Siah-1, which targets FIH for proteasomal degradation (7). The Cut-like homeodomain protein CDP can bind the FIH promoter region to regulate FIH expression at the transcriptional level (8). Phosphorylation of HIF at Thr796 also can prevent FIH hydroxylation on Asn803 (9). Potential FIH substrates also include proteins with ankyrin repeat domains, such as Iκ-B, Notch, and ASB4 (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CtBP1 (C-terminal binding protein 1) was first recognized as a cellular factor that interacts with the C-terminal portion of adenovirus E1A, a protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of key cellular genes (1). CtBP1 is able to regulate gene activity through its intrinsic dehydrogenase activity (2,3) and by interacting with Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins during development (4). Along with its homologue, CtBP2, it acts as a transcriptional corepressor of zinc-finger homeodomain factor deltaEF1 to regulate a wide range of cellular processes through transrepression mechanisms (5). Through its direct interaction with PRDM16, CtBP1 has been shown to be involved in brown adipose tissue differentiation by mediating the repression of white fat genes and directing differentiation toward the brown fat gene program (6). CtBP1 also plays a role in lipid metabolic pathways and membrane fission by regulating the fission machinery operating Golgi tubular networks (7). CtBP1 has recently been shown to repress transcription of BRCA1 via a redox regulated mechanism (8). Furthermore, it is thought that downregulation of BRCA1 and E-cadherin in invasive ductal breast carcinoma correlates directly with activation of CtBP1 (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nucleolor protein 66 (NO66), also known as Myc-associated protein with a jumonji C (JmjC) domain (MAPJD), or ribosomal oxygenase 1, belongs to a large family of JmjC-domain-containing oxygenase proteins. NO66 exhibits both ribosomal histidine hydroxylase and histone demethylase activities, and plays a key role in regulation of gene transcription, RNA processing, and translation. NO66-mediated hydroxylation of ribosomal protein L8 (Rpl8) may play a role in regulation of protein synthesis (1). NO66 also functions to repress transcription by demethylating histone H3 lys4 and lys36, two histone marks that are important for transcriptional activation (2). The interaction of NO66 with the transcription factor osterix (OSX) regulates osteoblast differentiation and bone formation through repression of OSX target genes (3,4). In embryonic stem cells, the PHF19 protein recruits NO66 along with polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2) to differentiation-specific target genes to repress transcription through demethylation of histone H3 lys36 and methylation of histone H3 lys27, the latter mark being associated with transcriptional repression (2). NO66 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and is associated with poor prognosis (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PHD finger protein 8 (PHF8) is a histone lysine demethylase that functions as a transcriptional activator by specifically demethylating a number of repressive histone methylation marks: mono- and di-methyl-histone H3 Lys9 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2), di-methyl-histone H3 Lys27 (H3K27me2) and mono-methyl-histone H4 Lys20 (H4K20me1). PHF8 contains an N-terminal zinc finger-like PHD domain that binds tri-methylated histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4Me3) and a C-terminal jumonji domain that is responsible for the demethylase activity (1). Deletion and point mutations (F279S) in the jumonji domain of PHF8 are associated with the onset of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). In addition, PHF8 is highly expressed in prostate cancer, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Its expression is predictive of poor survival (2-4). Overexpression of PHF8 increases cell proliferation and cell motility, while silencing of PHF8 reduces cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CtBP2 (carboxy-terminal binding protein-2) and its homolog CtBP1 are transcriptional co-repressors originally identified as proteins that bind the carboxy-terminus of the human adenovirus E1A protein (1-3). CtBP proteins are thought to play important roles in regulating various developmental pathways because deletion of CtBP2 leads to embryonic lethality at E10.5 and is correlated with axial patterning defects (4). CtBP proteins regulate various oncogenic signaling pathways as promoters of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, apoptosis antagonists, and tumor suppressor genes repressors (1,5). The CtBP protein transcription co-repression activity results from interactions with numerous transcription factors and chromatin modulators, including the polycomb group proteins (1,6,7). Depending on the context, CtBP proteins interact with a short amino acid sequence motif (PXDLS) to mediate repression of target genes through both histone deacetylase-dependent and independent mechanisms (6,8,9). CtBP proteins display a high sequence homology to the bacterial D-isomer-specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase enzymes. Research studies indicate that nuclear NADH levels regulate CtBP transcription repression activities, as NADH binding is required for CtBP2 homodimerization and transcription co-repressor activity (6,9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PHD finger protein 8 (PHF8) is a histone lysine demethylase that functions as a transcriptional activator by specifically demethylating a number of repressive histone methylation marks: mono- and di-methyl-histone H3 Lys9 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2), di-methyl-histone H3 Lys27 (H3K27me2) and mono-methyl-histone H4 Lys20 (H4K20me1). PHF8 contains an N-terminal zinc finger-like PHD domain that binds tri-methylated histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4Me3) and a C-terminal jumonji domain that is responsible for the demethylase activity (1). Deletion and point mutations (F279S) in the jumonji domain of PHF8 are associated with the onset of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). In addition, PHF8 is highly expressed in prostate cancer, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Its expression is predictive of poor survival (2-4). Overexpression of PHF8 increases cell proliferation and cell motility, while silencing of PHF8 reduces cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PHD1 (Egln2), PHD-2 (Egln1), and PHD3 (Egln3) are members of the Egln family of proline hydroxylases. They function as oxygen sensors that catalyze the hydroxylation of HIF on prolines 564 and 402, initiating the first step of HIF degradation through the VHL/ubiquitin pathway (1,2). PHD1 is highly expressed in a wide array of tissues whereas PHD2 and PHD3 are expressed mainly in heart and skeletal muscle (1,3). The mRNA levels of PHD are upregulated by HIF through the hypoxia-response element under low oxygen conditions (4-7). These three enzymes also exhibit different peptide specificity target proteins, PHD1 and PHD2 can hydroxylate both proline 402 and proline 564, but PHD3 can only hydroxylate proline 564 (2,8). In addition to HIF, PHD enzymes have also has been shown to catalyze the hydroxylation of RNA polymerase subunits and myogenin (3,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, PDCD8) is a ubiquitously expressed flavoprotein that plays a critical role in caspase-independent apoptosis (reviewed in 1,2). AIF is normally localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space and released in response to apoptotic stimuli (3). Treatment of isolated nuclei with recombinant AIF leads to early apoptotic events, such as chromatin condensation and large-scale DNA fragmentation (3). Studies of AIF knockout mice have shown that the apoptotic activity of AIF is cell type and stimuli-dependent. Also noted was that AIF was required for embryoid body cavitation, representing the first wave of programmed cell death during embryonic morphogenesis (4). Structural analysis of AIF revealed two important regions, the first having oxidoreductase activity and the second being a potential DNA binding domain (3,5). While AIF is redox-active and can behave as an NADH oxidase, this activity is not required for inducing apoptosis (6). Instead, recent studies suggest that AIF has dual functions, a pro-apoptotic activity in the nucleus via its DNA binding and an anti-apoptotic activity via the scavenging of free radicals through its oxidoreductase activity (2,7).

$348
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. AIF (D39D2) XP® Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for the immunoprecipitation of AIF. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated AIF (D39D2) XP® Rabbit mAb #5318.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, PDCD8) is a ubiquitously expressed flavoprotein that plays a critical role in caspase-independent apoptosis (reviewed in 1,2). AIF is normally localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space and released in response to apoptotic stimuli (3). Treatment of isolated nuclei with recombinant AIF leads to early apoptotic events, such as chromatin condensation and large-scale DNA fragmentation (3). Studies of AIF knockout mice have shown that the apoptotic activity of AIF is cell type and stimuli-dependent. Also noted was that AIF was required for embryoid body cavitation, representing the first wave of programmed cell death during embryonic morphogenesis (4). Structural analysis of AIF revealed two important regions, the first having oxidoreductase activity and the second being a potential DNA binding domain (3,5). While AIF is redox-active and can behave as an NADH oxidase, this activity is not required for inducing apoptosis (6). Instead, recent studies suggest that AIF has dual functions, a pro-apoptotic activity in the nucleus via its DNA binding and an anti-apoptotic activity via the scavenging of free radicals through its oxidoreductase activity (2,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (intracellular inclusions) and by the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Research studies have shown that mutations in α-synuclein, Parkin, and DJ-1 are linked to PD (1). α-synuclein is a major component of the aggregates found in Lewy bodies. Parkin is involved in protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and investigators have shown that mutations in Parkin cause early onset of PD (1). Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 cause early onset of PD, but DJ-1 is associated with multiple functions: it cooperates with Ras to increase cell transformation, it positively regulates transcription of the androgen receptor, and it may function as an indicator of oxidative stress (2-5). Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated functions are greatly impaired in DJ-1 (-/-) mice, resulting in reduced long-term depression (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Catalase catalyzes the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen (1). Research studies show that overexpression of this antioxidant enzyme increases the ability of pancreatic β-cells to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby protecting pancreatic β-cells from oxidative stress (2). The pancreatic β-cells overexpressing this enzyme are also protected from hydrogen peroxide-mediated lipotoxicity, providing further evidence for the importance of catalase in the pathogenesis of diabetes (3).