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Monkey Response to Uv

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 4 (ERCC4, XPF) forms a complex with the ERCC1 excision repair protein to create an essential 5’ endonuclease responsible for lesion excision (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Mutations in the corresponding XPF gene cause specific forms of xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, and Fanconi anemia, while altered XPF protein levels may be associated with disease progression and response to treatment in specific human cancers (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) enzymes HR6A and HR6B are the mammalian orthologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad6 gene products (1). In S. cerevisiae, Rad6 facilitates cell cycle progression and ubiquitinates histone H2B (2,3). In vivo phosphorylation of HR6A Ser120 by cyclin-dependent kinases is thought to be important for the coordination and timing of ubiquitination events involved in cell cycle progression (4). In response to DNA damage, HR6A is known to interact physically with p53 and p14ARF, but knockout mice lacking HR6A or HR6B exhibit normal DNA damage responses (5,6). HR6B knockout males exhibit defective spermatogenesis, while HR6A knockout females fail to produce viable offspring (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: XPB and XPD are ATPase/helicase subunits of the TFIIH complex that are involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) to remove lesions and photoproducts generated by UV light (1). XPB and XPD are 3’-5’ and 5’-3’ DNA helicases, respectively, that play a role in opening of the DNA damage site to facilitate repair (2,3). XPB and XPD both play an important role in maintaining genomic stability, and researchers have linked mutations of these proteins to Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Trichothiodystrophy (TTD). XP patients have abnormalities in skin pigmentation and are highly susceptible to skin cancers, while TTD patients exhibit symptoms such as brittle hair, neurological abnormalities, and mild photosensitivity (4). In addition to their role in NER, XPB and XPD are involved in transcription initiation as part of the TFIIH core complex (5). The helicase activity of XPB unwinds DNA around the transcription start site to facilitate RNA polymerase II promoter clearance and initiation of transcription (6). XPD plays a structural role linking core TFIIH components with the cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex that phosphorylates the C-terminus of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, leading to transcription initiation (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Deleted in breast cancer gene 1 protein (DBC1) was originally identified by its localization to a region of chromosome 8p21 that is homozygously deleted in breast cancer (1). DBC1 is a large, nuclear protein with multiple functions in cell survival. It binds directly to the estrogen receptor α (ERα) hormone-binding domain in a ligand-independent manner and may be a key determinant of ligand-independent ERα expression and survival in human breast cancer cells (2). DBC1 can promote p53-mediated apoptosis by binding to and inhibiting the deacetylase activity of SirT1, resulting in increased p53 acetylation levels and activity (3). DBC1 may be an important regulator of heterochromatin formation as it binds SUV39H1 and inhibits its histone methyltransferase activity (4). Caspase-dependent processing activates the pro-apoptotic activity of DBC1 during Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α)-mediated cell death signaling (5). This processing of DBC1 in response to TNF-α is an early event in the onset of apoptosis and results in relocalization of DBC1 to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of the processed, cytoplasmic form of DBC1 results in mitochondrial clustering and matrix condensation and sensitizes cells to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Deleted in breast cancer gene 1 protein (DBC1) was originally identified by its localization to a region of chromosome 8p21 that is homozygously deleted in breast cancer (1). DBC1 is a large, nuclear protein with multiple functions in cell survival. It binds directly to the estrogen receptor α (ERα) hormone-binding domain in a ligand-independent manner and may be a key determinant of ligand-independent ERα expression and survival in human breast cancer cells (2). DBC1 can promote p53-mediated apoptosis by binding to and inhibiting the deacetylase activity of SirT1, resulting in increased p53 acetylation levels and activity (3). DBC1 may be an important regulator of heterochromatin formation as it binds SUV39H1 and inhibits its histone methyltransferase activity (4). Caspase-dependent processing activates the pro-apoptotic activity of DBC1 during Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α)-mediated cell death signaling (5). This processing of DBC1 in response to TNF-α is an early event in the onset of apoptosis and results in relocalization of DBC1 to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of the processed, cytoplasmic form of DBC1 results in mitochondrial clustering and matrix condensation and sensitizes cells to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YY1 (Yin Yang1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with fundamental roles in embryogenesis, differentiation, replication and proliferation. YY1 contains four zinc finger motifs of the Cys-Cys-His-His type and can activate different eukaryotic genes (such as CREB, c-myc, Histone H4, p53 and PARP-1) or repress different eukaryotic genes (such as α-actin, IFN-β and IFN-γ) as well as regulate some viral promoters (1). YY1 deficient embryos die approximately at the time of implantation, suggesting that YY1 has an essential role in embryonic development (2). YY1 is overexpressed in cancer cells such as prostate cancer and therefore may be considered a prognostic marker (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by growth factors and nutrients including amino acids (1,2). MAP4K3 is a mediator between nutrient signal and mTORC1 (1). Research studies suggest that amino acid sufficiency leads to the phosphorylation of Ser170 on MAP4K3, which activates mTORC1 (3).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Mutations in the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), an autosomal dominant familial tumor syndrome typified by tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid, lung, and enteropancreatic endocrine tissues (1,2). Patients with this tumor syndrome have inherited either missense or truncation mutations in one allele of the MEN1 gene, while the other allele is subject to loss of heterozygosity in tumors from these patients (1,2). Menin, the protein product of the MEN1 gene, is a component of the mixed-lineage leukemia protein (MLL)-containing histone methyltransferase complex that facilitates methylation of histone H3 Lys4 to promote transcriptional activation (3,4). Menin functions to suppress proliferation of pancreatic islet cells, at least in part through MLL-mediated activation of the p18INK4c (p18) and p27CIP/KIP (p27) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes (5,6). Loss of Menin leads to a decrease in methylation of histone H3 Lys4 and decreased expression of the p18 and p27 genes, leading to hyperplasia (5,6). In contrast to its role as a tumor suppressor in endocrine cells, Menin has been shown to promote proliferation in leukemia cells driven by MLL-fusion proteins. Menin is essential for oncogenic MLL-fusion-protein-mediated transformation of bone marrow cells and is required for histone H3 Lys4 methylation and expression of the Hoxa9 gene (7,8). Menin interacts with a wide range of proteins, including JunD, SMAD family members, estrogen receptor, vitamin D receptor, PEM, NFκB, FANCD2, RPA2, NMMHC II-A, GFAP, vimentin, and Hsp70 suggesting additional roles in transcriptional regulation, DNA processing and repair, cytoskeleton organization, and protein degradation (9,10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) action (1,2). There are five DUB subfamilies including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM enzymes. USP1 belongs to the USP subfamily and is regulated in a cell cycle dependent manner by both transcriptional and ubiquitin-proteosomal mechanisms (3). USP1 is a nuclear protein and localizes to chromatin where it is specifically associated with FANCD2. USP1 deubiquitinates monoubiquitinated FANCD2, which plays an important role in DNA damage repair and Chk1 protein stability (3,4). Another important target of USP1 is PCNA. USP1 deubiquitinates monoubiquitinated PCNA, thereby negatively regulating PCNA-mediated translesion synthesis (TLS) during DNA repair (5). USP1 interaction with UAF1, a WD40 repeat-containing protein, leads to formation of an activated USP1/UAF1 complex, which is required for the deubiquitinase activity of USP1 (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YY1 (Yin Yang1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with fundamental roles in embryogenesis, differentiation, replication and proliferation. YY1 contains four zinc finger motifs of the Cys-Cys-His-His type and can activate different eukaryotic genes (such as CREB, c-myc, Histone H4, p53 and PARP-1) or repress different eukaryotic genes (such as α-actin, IFN-β and IFN-γ) as well as regulate some viral promoters (1). YY1 deficient embryos die approximately at the time of implantation, suggesting that YY1 has an essential role in embryonic development (2). YY1 is overexpressed in cancer cells such as prostate cancer and therefore may be considered a prognostic marker (1).

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-amino-terminal kinase SAPK/JNK is potently and preferentially activated by a variety of environmental stresses including UV and gamma radiation, ceramides, inflammatory cytokines, and in some instances, growth factors and GPCR agonists (1-6). As with the other MAPKs, the core signaling unit is composed of a MAPKKK, typically MEKK1-MEKK4, or by one of the mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), which phosphorylate and activate MKK4/7. Upon activation, MKKs phosphorylate and activate the SAPK/JNK kinase (2). Stress signals are delivered to this cascade by small GTPases of the Rho family (Rac, Rho, cdc42) (3). Both Rac1 and cdc42 mediate the stimulation of MEKKs and MLKs (3). Alternatively, MKK4/7 can be activated in a GTPase-independent mechanism via stimulation of a germinal center kinase (GCK) family member (4). There are three SAPK/JNK genes each of which undergoes alternative splicing, resulting in numerous isoforms (3). SAPK/JNK, when active as a dimer, can translocate to the nucleus and regulate transcription through its effects on c-Jun, ATF-2, and other transcription factors (3,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MKK7 is a MAP kinase kinase that serves as a specific activator of the SAPK/JNK pathway (1,2). MKK7 is strongly activated by TNF-α, as well as other environmental stresses, whereas SEK1/MKK4, which activates both p38 and SAPK/JNK pathways, is not activated by TNF-α (2). Sequence alignment of the activation loop of the MAP kinase kinase family members indicates that Ser271 and Thr275 are potential phosphorylation sites that are crucial for the kinase acivity.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-AMPKα (Thr172) (40H9) Rabbit mAb #2535.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).