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Monkey Secretion by Cell

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tyro3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the TAM subfamily (Tyro3, Axl and Mer). All three members have similar domain structure composed of an extracellular region with 2 Ig-like domains, followed by 2 FNII-like domains, a single transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain (1). The natural ligand for Tyro3, as well as Axl and Mer, is Gas6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) (1,2). Expression pattern and target knockout data indicate an important role of Tyro3 in apoptotic cell phagocytosis of dendritic cells and macrophages (3), NK cell differentiation (4), reproductive neuron survival and migration (5), osteoclast stimulation (6,7), as well as cortical and hippocampal neuron function (8). Both MAPK and PI3K pathways have been suggested as downstream targets of Tyro3 activation (7,8). Tyro3 has also been shown to be correlated to melanoma tumorigenesis, likely through its reglulatory role in the expression of oncogenic microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Pig

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Axl (C89E7) Rabbit mAb #8661.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members are negative regulators of cytokine signal transduction that inhibit the Jak/Stat pathway (1-3). The SOCS family consists of at least 8 members including the originally identified cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS1), as well as SOCS1-7. Each SOCS family member contains a central SH2 domain and a conserved carboxy-terminal motif designated as the SOCS box. These proteins are important regulators of cytokine signaling, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated HMGB1 (D3E5) Rabbit mAb #6893.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated MeCP2 (D4F3) XP® Rabbit mAb #3456.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is the founding member of a family of methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins that also includes MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, MBD4, MBD5 and MBD6 (1-3). Apart from MBD3, these proteins bind methylated cytosine residues in the context of the di-nucleotide 5´-CG-3´ to establish and maintain regions of transcriptionally inactive chromatin by recruiting a variety of co-repressor proteins (2). MeCP2 recruits histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 (4-6). MBD1 couples transcriptional silencing to DNA replication and interacts with the histone methyltransferases ESET and SUV39H1 (7,8). MBD2 and MBD3 co-purify as part of the NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation) co-repressor complex, which contains the chromatin remodeling ATPase Mi-2, HDAC1 and HDAC2 (9,10). MBD5 and MBD6 have recently been identified and little is known regarding their protein interactions. MBD proteins are associated with cancer and other diseases; MBD4 is best characterized for its role in DNA repair and MBD2 has been linked to intestinal cancer (11,12). Mutations in the MeCP2 gene cause the neurologic developmental disorder Rett Syndrome (13). MeCP2 protein levels are high in neurons, where it plays a critical role in multiple synaptic processes (14). In response to various physiological stimuli, MeCP2 is phosphorylated on Ser421 and regulates the expression of genes controlling dendritic patterning and spine morphogenesis (14). Disruption of this process in individuals with altered MeCP2 may cause the pathological changes seen in Rett Syndrome.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is the founding member of a family of methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins that also includes MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, MBD4, MBD5 and MBD6 (1-3). Apart from MBD3, these proteins bind methylated cytosine residues in the context of the di-nucleotide 5´-CG-3´ to establish and maintain regions of transcriptionally inactive chromatin by recruiting a variety of co-repressor proteins (2). MeCP2 recruits histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 (4-6). MBD1 couples transcriptional silencing to DNA replication and interacts with the histone methyltransferases ESET and SUV39H1 (7,8). MBD2 and MBD3 co-purify as part of the NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation) co-repressor complex, which contains the chromatin remodeling ATPase Mi-2, HDAC1 and HDAC2 (9,10). MBD5 and MBD6 have recently been identified and little is known regarding their protein interactions. MBD proteins are associated with cancer and other diseases; MBD4 is best characterized for its role in DNA repair and MBD2 has been linked to intestinal cancer (11,12). Mutations in the MeCP2 gene cause the neurologic developmental disorder Rett Syndrome (13). MeCP2 protein levels are high in neurons, where it plays a critical role in multiple synaptic processes (14). In response to various physiological stimuli, MeCP2 is phosphorylated on Ser421 and regulates the expression of genes controlling dendritic patterning and spine morphogenesis (14). Disruption of this process in individuals with altered MeCP2 may cause the pathological changes seen in Rett Syndrome.