Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Axonal Fasciculation

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Axonal Fasciculation

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myelinated axons contain un-myelinated gaps called nodes of Ranvier. These regularly spaced gaps are critical for the proper propagation and rapid conduction of nerve impulses in the central and peripheral nervous system (1). The structure and organization of the nodes of Ranvier is dictated by interaction between the axon and glial cells (2). Voltage-gated sodium channels concentrated at the nodes and potassium channels clustered at the paranodes are responsible for propagation of the action potentials (3,4). Other proteins that contribute to the architecture and function of the nodes of Ranvier include βIV spectrin (5), ankyrin-G (6), and the L1 cell adhesion molecules, neurofascin and NrCAM (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Class 3 secreted semaphorin (Sema3A) is a chemorepellent that acts upon a wide variety of axons. As such, it induces a dramatic redistribution and depolymerization of actin filaments that results in growth cone collapse. Plexins are single pass, transmembrane signaling proteins encompassing Plexin A1, A2, A3 and A4. Plexins form a complex with neuropilin-1 and -2 and the cell adhesion protein L1 to form a functional semaphorin receptor (1,2). The GTPase Rnd1 binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Plexin A1 to trigger cytoskeletal collapse. In contrast, the GTPase RhoD blocks Rnd1-mediated Plexin A1 activation and repulsion of sympathetic axons by Sema3A (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule, or NRCAM, belongs to the immunoglobulins Cell Adhesion Molecules (CAM's) superfamily (1). NRCAM, an ankyrin-binding protein, contributes to the neurite outgrowth by providing directional signaling during axonal cone growth (2, 3, 4). Additionally, it plays a role in mediating the interaction between axons and Schwann cells and contributes to the formation and maintenance of Nodes of Ranvier (5, 6, 7, 8). NRCAM also plays an important role in the establishment of dendritic spines in developing cortical neurons (9). NRCAM is expressed in non-neuronal cells, mostly in endothelial cells (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons, regulating the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, but high levels of kinase activity are detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no discrete substrates have been attributed as a function of p35 vs. p39. Amongst many, substrates of CDK5 include p35 and p39. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, and this is likely a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). NGF activates Erk and EGR1, and induces p35 expression in PC12 cells (3). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Accumulation of p25 is found in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (4-5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ephrin receptor B2 (EphB2) is an ephrin family receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in regulating growth and development of multiple tissues and organs (1,2). The EphB2 transmembrane receptor protein contains a kinase domain, a PDZ motif, and a SAM domain within a conserved cytoplasmic domain. A ligand binding domain, a cysteine-rich domain, and fibronectin type III repeats comprise the conserved EphB2 extracellular domain (3). EphB2 binds with high affinity to ephrin B ligands, and to some ephrin A proteins, to initiate bidirectional signaling between neighboring cells (1,2). Upon binding, EphB2-Ephrin B2 dimers form a heterotetramer and position the receptor-ligand complex on the cell membrane to facilitate bidirectional signal transduction (3). In addition to associating with ephrin ligands, EphB2 also regulates a number of biological processes through interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK), NMDA receptor (NMDAR), the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1, and p21-activated kinase (PAK1) (4-7). While some studies support a role for EphB2 as a pro-oncogenic kinase, other research suggests that EphB2 acts as a tumor suppressor (1,2,4,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The endocannabinoid system consists of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2 receptors, the enzymes that produce and degrade the endogenous cannabinoid ligands (such as FAAH, DAG lipases, and MAG lipase), and the endocannabinoid ligands derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (1-3). CB1 receptor belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and harbors a large N-terminal extracellular domain, seven transmembrane domains, and a C-terminal intracellular tail. CB1 receptor is coupled to the Gai/o subunit of the G protein which inhibits adenylyl cyclases and regulates calcium and potassium ion channels (4). CB1 receptor is one of the most abundant GPCRs in the central nervous system. It has been show to play critical roles in the wiring of the brain during development (5), in neuronal plasticity (6), analgesia, drug abuse and metabolic homeostasis (7). In addition, CB1 receptor has been shown to interact with other GPCRs, to give rise to novel pharmacological and signaling heteromers with implication in diseases (8,9).