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Monoclonal Antibody b Cell Differentiation

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescence of rat cerebellum. The unconjugated antibody #3670 reacts with human, mouse and rat GFAP protein. CST expects that GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 555 Conjugate) will also recognize GFAP in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHD7 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by altering the chromatin structure at target genes (1,2). The nine members of the CHD family are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). The CHD proteins can be further divided into three subgroups based on the presence of additional conserved functional domains. CHD7 belongs to the third subgroup of CHD proteins together with CHD6, 8, and 9, which are distinguished by the presence of three conserved region (CR) domains, a switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB (SANT) like domain, two brahma and kismet (BRK) domains, and a DNA binding domain (2). CHD7 regulates embryonic stem cell (ESC) specific gene expression together with ESC master regulators Oct-4, Sox2 and nanog, and is necessary for neural stem cell development and formation of the neural crest (5-7). Research studies have shown that CHD7 mutations are frequently found in patients with CHARGE syndrome (coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth/development, genital/urinary abnormalities, and ear abnormalities and deafness) (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: SIN3 was originally identified as a negative regulator of transcription in budding yeast (1,2). Since then, three isoforms of the SIN3 proteins have been identified in mammalian cells, as products of two different genes, SIN3A and SIN3B (3,4). Both SIN3A and SIN3B are nuclear proteins that function as scaffolding subunits for the multi-subunit SIN3 transcriptional repressor complex, containing SIN3A or SIN3B, HDAC1, HDAC2, SDS3, RBBP4/RBAP48, RBBP7/RBAP46, SAP30, and SAP18 (3,4). SIN3 proteins contain four paired amphipathic alpha-helix (PAH) motifs that function in the recruitment of the SIN3 complex to target genes by binding a multitude of DNA-binding transcriptional repressor proteins, including Mad1, p53, E2F4, HCF-1, AML1, Elk-1, NRSF, CTCF, ERα, and MeCP2 (3,4). In addition, SIN3 proteins contain an HDAC interaction domain (HID), which mediates binding of HDAC1 and HDAC2 via the SDS3 bridging protein, and a highly conserved region (HCR) at the carboxy terminus, which contributes to repressor protein binding (3,4). RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins also bind to SDS3 and contribute to nucleosome binding of the complex. The SIN3 complex functions to repress transcription, in part, by deacetylating histones at target gene promoters (3,4). In addition, recent studies have shown that SIN3 is recruited to the coding regions of repressed and active genes, where it deacetylates histones and suppresses spurious transcription by RNA polymerase II (3,5). In addition to histone deacetylase activity, the SIN3 complex associates with histone methyltransferase (ESET), histone demethylase (JARID1A/RBP2), ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling (SWI/SNF), methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) activities, all of which appear to contribute to the regulation of target genes (5-9). The SIN3 complex is critical for proper regulation of embryonic development, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA methylation (imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation) (3,4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb #3670.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CACYBP/SIP) is a component of the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex that also contains Siah1, Skp1, and Ebi (1). CACYBP regulates β-catenin turnover and plays an important role in thymocyte development (2). CACYBP also binds to tubulin and may be involved in cytoskeletal regulation (3,4). It is highly expressed in neurons, and its cellular localization may be regulated by Ca2+ (5,6). Retinoic acid treatment of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induces translocation of CACYBP to the nucleus and seems to be correlated with phosphorylation of CACYBP on serine residues (7). Recent studies also suggest that CACYBP may possess phosphatase activity (8), and that it can bind and dephosphorylate Erk1/2 (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SPT6 or SUPT6H is a histone H3 chaperone protein involved in transcriptional elongation and chromatin structure (1). The SPT6 protein contains a highly acidic N-terminus with leucine zipper and SH2 domains, which can interact with phospho-Rpb1 CTD (Ser2) to recruit SPN1 and other mRNA processing and export factors (2). SPT6 can enhance the elongation rate of RNA polymerase II, and can also maintain the modification state of histone H3 tails. (3-4). Loss of SPT6 causes improper initiation of transcription within coding regions (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MYST1, also known as mammalian male absent on the first (MOF) and lysine acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8), is a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2 and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (1,2). As the catalytic subunit of two different histone acetyltransferase complexes, MSL and NSL, MYST1 is responsible for the majority of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation in the cell. MYST1 also acetylates p53 on lysine 120 and is important for activation of pro-apoptotic genes (1,2). As a component of the MSL complex, MYST1 associates with MSL1, MSL2L1, and MSL3L1, and specifically acetylates histone H4 on lysine 16 (3-5). As part of the NSL complex, MYST1 associates with the MLL1 histone methyltransferase complex containing MLL1/KMT2A, ASH2L, HCFC1, WDR5 and RBBP5, and shows broader acetyltransferase activity for histone H4 on lysines 5, 8, and 16 (3-5). MYST1 plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription, DNA repair, autophagy, apoptosis, and emybryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation (1,2,6). Loss of MYST1 leads to a global reduction in histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation, a common hallmark found in many human cancers. A reduction of MYST1 protein levels and histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation is associated with poor prognosis in breast, renal, colorectal, gastric, and ovarian cancers (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTBP1 and PTBP2 are highly related pre-mRNA binding proteins that silence the splicing of alternative exons (1,2 ). While PTBP1 is widely expressed, PTBP2, also known as neural PTB or nPTB, is expressed in post-mitotic neurons. In other cell types, PTBP2 transcripts are alternatively spliced by PTBP1, which leads to nonsense-mediated decay (3). PTBP1 and 2 bind to similar regions across the transcriptome, but PTBP1 has a stronger repressive property likely due to cofactors such as Raver1 and Matrin3 (4-6). Overexpression of PTBPs in various cancers has been observed, leading to alternative splicing of key proteins in oncogenic pathways (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTBP1 and PTBP2 are highly related pre-mRNA binding proteins that silence the splicing of alternative exons (1,2 ). While PTBP1 is widely expressed, PTBP2, also known as neural PTB or nPTB, is expressed in post-mitotic neurons. In other cell types, PTBP2 transcripts are alternatively spliced by PTBP1, which leads to nonsense-mediated decay (3). PTBP1 and 2 bind to similar regions across the transcriptome, but PTBP1 has a stronger repressive property likely due to cofactors such as Raver1 and Matrin3 (4-6). Overexpression of PTBPs in various cancers has been observed, leading to alternative splicing of key proteins in oncogenic pathways (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Post-transcriptional processing of RNAs such as RNA editing is an important mechanism by which diversity in RNA and protein is achieved that is not otherwise encoded by the genome (1,2). The most common form of RNA editing is the conversion of adenosine (A) into inosine (I) on double stranded RNA by the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins (1-3). Since inosine base pairs with cytidine, it is interpreted as a guanosine by the splicing and translational machinery leading to alteration in the protein sequence, as well as splicing isoforms being generated (1,4-6). A-to-I editing can also influence RNA sequence recognition by RNA binding proteins and non-coding RNA, such as miRNAs, affecting subsequent RNA processing, stability, and protein expression levels (2).ADAR1 is ubiquitously expressed with two known isoforms ADAR1L (p150) and ADAR1S (p110) resulting from transcription using alternative promoters and start codons. ADAR1S is constitutively expressed in the nucleus, while ADAR1L is interferon-inducible and present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The induction of ADAR1L in response to cellular stress and viral infection suggests a role for RNA editing in the innate immune response (1,7). In addition, ADAR1 is essential in mammalian development, particularly in hematopoiesis and suppression of interferon signaling to protect hematopoietic stem cells from destruction in the fetal liver and the adult bone marrow (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ASF1 was first identified in S. cerevisiae based on its ability to de-repress transcriptional silencing when overexpressed (1). While only one gene exists in yeast and Drosophila, mammalian cells contain the two highly homologous ASF1A and ASF1B genes (2). ASF1A and ASF1B function as histone chaperones, delivering histone H3/H4 dimers to CAF-1 or HIRA histone deposition complexes to facilitate replication-coupled and replication-independent nucleosome assembly on DNA (2-5). Both ASF1A and ASF1B bind to CAF-1, but only ASF1A binds to HIRA (5). In addition to playing a role in DNA replication and gene silencing, ASF1 functions in DNA damage repair, genome stability and cellular senescence. Deletion of ASF1 in yeast and Drosophila confers sensitivity to various DNA damaging agents and inhibitors of DNA replication, increases genomic instability and sister chromatid exchange, and activates the DNA damage checkpoint (6-8). Depletion of both ASF1A and ASF1B in mammalian cells results in the accumulation of cells in S phase, increased phosphorylation of H2A.X, centrosome amplification and apoptosis (9,10). ASF1A is required for the formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF), with overexpression of ASF1A inducing senescence in primary cells (4). Both ASF1A and ASF1B are phosphorylated in S phase by the Tousled-like kinases TLK1 and TLK2, and are dephosphorylated when TLK1 and TLK2 are inactivated by Chk1 kinase in response to replicative stress (11,12). The function of ASF1 phosphorylation is not yet understood.

$305
100 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescence of rat cells. The unconjugated antibody GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb #3670 reacts with human, mouse and rat GFAP protein. CST expects that GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) will also recognize GFAP in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescence of rat cells. The unconjugated antibody #3670 reacts with human, mouse and rat GFAP protein. CST expects that GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize GFAP in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The HECT domain-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase HECTH9 (also known as HUWE1, ARF-BP1, URE-B1, Mule, and LASU1) is critical for the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of many target proteins, and is involved in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes, including DNA replication and base excision repair, cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. HECTH9 contains two Armadillo (ARM) repeat-like domains (ARLD1 and ARLD2), a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, a WWE domain, a well-conserved BH3 domain, and a catalytic HECT domain that facilitates ubiquitination of target proteins. HECTH9 has been shown to polyubiquitinate p53 (1,2), Miz1 (3), N-Myc (4,5), Mcl-1 (6), Cdc 6 (7), and DNA polymerase beta (8) through K48-mediated linkage, thereby targeting these proteins for proteosomal degradation. The tumor suppressor protein ARF (known as p14 ARF in humans and p19 ARF in mice) binds to and inhibits the uibiquitin ligase activity toward p53, resulting in stabilization of p53 and induction of apoptosis (1). HECTH9 has also been shown to polyubiquitinate c-Myc through K63-linkage, which is required for recruitment of p300, activation of c-Myc target genes, and induction of cellular proliferation (9). HECTH9 is overexpressed in colon, lung, and breast cancer (1,9). In addition, defects in HECTH9 result in mental retardation syndromic X-linked Turner type (MRXST) and mental retardation X-linked type 17 (MRX17) syndromes (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SIN3 was originally identified as a negative regulator of transcription in budding yeast (1,2). Since then, three isoforms of the SIN3 proteins have been identified in mammalian cells, as products of two different genes, SIN3A and SIN3B (3,4). Both SIN3A and SIN3B are nuclear proteins that function as scaffolding subunits for the multi-subunit SIN3 transcriptional repressor complex, containing SIN3A or SIN3B, HDAC1, HDAC2, SDS3, RBBP4/RBAP48, RBBP7/RBAP46, SAP30, and SAP18 (3,4). SIN3 proteins contain four paired amphipathic alpha-helix (PAH) motifs that function in the recruitment of the SIN3 complex to target genes by binding a multitude of DNA-binding transcriptional repressor proteins, including Mad1, p53, E2F4, HCF-1, AML1, Elk-1, NRSF, CTCF, ERα, and MeCP2 (3,4). In addition, SIN3 proteins contain an HDAC interaction domain (HID), which mediates binding of HDAC1 and HDAC2 via the SDS3 bridging protein, and a highly conserved region (HCR) at the carboxy terminus, which contributes to repressor protein binding (3,4). RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins also bind to SDS3 and contribute to nucleosome binding of the complex. The SIN3 complex functions to repress transcription, in part, by deacetylating histones at target gene promoters (3,4). In addition, recent studies have shown that SIN3 is recruited to the coding regions of repressed and active genes, where it deacetylates histones and suppresses spurious transcription by RNA polymerase II (3,5). In addition to histone deacetylase activity, the SIN3 complex associates with histone methyltransferase (ESET), histone demethylase (JARID1A/RBP2), ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling (SWI/SNF), methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) activities, all of which appear to contribute to the regulation of target genes (5-9). The SIN3 complex is critical for proper regulation of embryonic development, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA methylation (imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation) (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated (CAND1)/TIP120A is a protein containing multiple HEAT repeats. It functions, in part, as an inhibitor of multiple cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) via binding to cullin-RBX complexes that are both unconjugated to NEDD8 and lack association with substrate recognition subunits (1-3). Indeed, CAND1 has been shown to bind all cullin family members in human cells and analysis of the crystal structure of human CAND1 bound to the CUL1-RBX1 complex suggests that CAND1 inhibits the activity of CRLs by sterically blocking both the substrate recognition subunit binding site and the NEDD8 conjugation site (1,3,4). Conversely, CAND1 binding to cullin-RBX complexes is incompatible with neddylation as NEDD8 conjugated to cullins blocks CAND1 binding, suggesting that CAND1 binds to cullins only after the COP9 signalosome has catalyzed cullin deneddylation. Through its ability to negatively regulate CRL assembly, CAND1 plays an integral part in facilitating CRL activation cycles that allow CRLs to utilize distinct substrate recognition subunits and protects these subunits from undergoing ubiquitin-dependent degradation (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Inhibitor of DNA-binding/Differentiation (ID) proteins are a family of proteins that function to repress the activity of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. There are four known ID proteins in humans (ID1-4), all of which contain a helix-loop-helix domain but lack a basic DNA binding domain. Heterodimerization with bHLH transcription factors therefore functions to sequester bHLH proteins and prevent their binding to DNA (1). ID proteins play important functional roles in development, primarily by inhibiting premature differentiation of stem/progenitor cells (1,2). ID3 plays an important role in immune system development where it has been shown to repress E2A-mediated differentiation of T cells (3). Studies in mouse models have shown that homozygous deletion of ID3 disrupts regulatory T cell differentiation (4) and leads to development of γδ T cell lymphoma (5). Outside of the hematopoietic compartment, ID3 was shown to repress MyoD, implicating ID3 in TGFβ-mediated muscle repair (6). Similarly, research studies have shown that ID3 suppresses p21 in colon cancer cells, a function that is purported to promote the self-renewal capacity of putative cancer-initiating cells (7).