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Monoclonal Antibody Chromatin IP Mouse

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) of proteins contributes to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death, and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, EED-EZH2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. This histone methyl-transferase activity requires the Ezh2, Eed, and Suz12 subunits of the complex (5). Histone H3 methylation at Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinylates histone H2A on Lys119 (6). Bmi1 is a component of the PRC1 complex, which together with Ring1 strongly enhances the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the Ring2 catalytic subunit (7). Bmi1 plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and senescence through repression of the p16 INK4A and p19 ARF genes and is required for maintenance of adult hematopoietic and neural stem cells (3,4,8-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of nine proteins is divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All CHD proteins contain two tandem amino-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a carboxy-terminal DNA-binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD proteins are often found in large, multiprotein complexes with their transcriptional activation or repression activity governed by other proteins within the complex. CHD3 (also known as Mi2-α) and CHD4 (also known as Mi2-β) are central components of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains HDAC1, HDAC2, RBAP48, RBAP46, MTA1, MTA2, MTA3, and MBD3 (3-8). Both CHD3 and CHD4 contain two plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc finger domains that bind directly to HDAC1 and HDAC2.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death, and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The PRC2 (EZH2-EED) complex is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. Methylation of Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the PRC1 complex, which ubiquitinylates histone H2A on Lys119 (5). Suppressor of Zeste 12 (SUZ12) is an obligate component of the PRC2 complex, which together with EZH2 and EED is absolutely required for histone methyltransferase activity of the protein complex (6).The zinc finger AE binding protein 2 (AEBP2) is another integral component of the PRC2 complex. Addition of AEBP2 to the PRC2 core complex (EZH2-EED-SUZ12) enhances histone H3 Lys27 methyltransferase activity on nucleosomal substrates in vitro, which may be mediated in part by three AEBP2 DNA-binding zinc finger domains (5,7). AEBP2-mediated enhancement of enzymatic activity is greater on nucleosomal substrates that contain mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A Lys119, which suggests that AEBP2 may target PRC2 complexes in vivo through binding to DNA and mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A Lys119 (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MYST2, also known as HBO1 and lysine acetyltransferase 7 (KAT7), is a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2 and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). MYST2 is the catalytic subunit of the HBO1 acetyltransferase complex, which consists of MYST2, MYST/ESA1-asociated factor 6 (MEAF6), inhibitor of growth protein 4 (ING4) or inhibitor of growth protein 5 (ING5), and one of two families of scaffold proteins (JADE-1/2/3 or BRPF1/2/3) (1,2). The substrate specificity of the HBO1 complex is determined by the associated scaffold protein. HBO1 complexes containing JADE scaffold proteins acetylate histone H4 on lysines 5, 8 and 12, while complexes containing BRPF scaffold proteins acetylate histone H3 on lysines 14 and 23 (2). In addition the scaffold protein appears to regulate the function of the HBO1 complex. Complexes containing JADE scaffold proteins bind to origin recognition complex 1 (ORC1) and regulate licensing of DNA replication, while HBO1 complexes containing BRPF scaffold proteins regulate transcription (2-5). MYST2 is required for regulation of cell proliferation (1), adipogenesis (6), embryonic development (7) and survival of fetal liver erythroblasts (8). In addition, MYST2 is over-expressed in several human cancers, including cancers of the testis, ovary, breast, stomach, esophagus, and bladder (9). The MYST2 gene is amplified and protein is over-expressed in breast cancers, and over-expression of MYST2 increases anchorage-independent growth of several breast cancer cell lines (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Erg-associated protein with SET domain (ESET), also known as SET-domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) protein, is a member of a family of histone lysine methyltransferases, each of which contains a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in Drosophila Su[var]3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins (1). ESET also contains tudor and methyl-CpG-binding domains, which may coordinate binding to methylated histones and methylated DNA, respectively (1). ESET methylates histone H3 Lys9, creating a transcriptionally repressive mark that facilitates gene silencing (1-3). However, unlike SUV39H histone H3 Lys9 methyltransferases, which function mainly in heterochromatin regions such as pericentric heterochromatin, ESET functions mainly in euchromatic regions to repress gene promoters (3). ESET interacts with a variety of proteins, including transcription factors (ERG), histone deacetylases (HDAC1/2), DNA methyltransferases (DNMT3A/B) and transcriptional co-repressors (mSin3A/B, MBD1, KAP-1, the ATFa-associated modulator mAM) (1-6). mAM forms a complex with ESET, stimulating its methyltransferase activity, specifically the conversion of di-methyl to tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 (2). MBD1 recruits ESET to the CAF-1 complex to facilitate methylation of histone H3 Lys9 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly in S phase (5). DNMT3A recruits ESET to silenced promoters in cancer cells (7). ESET may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, since levels of ESET protein and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 are both increased in diseased brains (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PHD finger protein 8 (PHF8) is a histone lysine demethylase that functions as a transcriptional activator by specifically demethylating a number of repressive histone methylation marks: mono- and di-methyl-histone H3 Lys9 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2), di-methyl-histone H3 Lys27 (H3K27me2) and mono-methyl-histone H4 Lys20 (H4K20me1). PHF8 contains an N-terminal zinc finger-like PHD domain that binds tri-methylated histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4Me3) and a C-terminal jumonji domain that is responsible for the demethylase activity (1). Deletion and point mutations (F279S) in the jumonji domain of PHF8 are associated with the onset of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). In addition, PHF8 is highly expressed in prostate cancer, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Its expression is predictive of poor survival (2-4). Overexpression of PHF8 increases cell proliferation and cell motility, while silencing of PHF8 reduces cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: SIN3 was originally identified as a negative regulator of transcription in budding yeast (1,2). Since then, three isoforms of the SIN3 proteins have been identified in mammalian cells, as products of two different genes, SIN3A and SIN3B (3,4). Both SIN3A and SIN3B are nuclear proteins that function as scaffolding subunits for the multi-subunit SIN3 transcriptional repressor complex, containing SIN3A or SIN3B, HDAC1, HDAC2, SDS3, RBBP4/RBAP48, RBBP7/RBAP46, SAP30, and SAP18 (3,4). SIN3 proteins contain four paired amphipathic alpha-helix (PAH) motifs that function in the recruitment of the SIN3 complex to target genes by binding a multitude of DNA-binding transcriptional repressor proteins, including Mad1, p53, E2F4, HCF-1, AML1, Elk-1, NRSF, CTCF, ERα, and MeCP2 (3,4). In addition, SIN3 proteins contain an HDAC interaction domain (HID), which mediates binding of HDAC1 and HDAC2 via the SDS3 bridging protein, and a highly conserved region (HCR) at the carboxy terminus, which contributes to repressor protein binding (3,4). RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins also bind to SDS3 and contribute to nucleosome binding of the complex. The SIN3 complex functions to repress transcription, in part, by deacetylating histones at target gene promoters (3,4). In addition, recent studies have shown that SIN3 is recruited to the coding regions of repressed and active genes, where it deacetylates histones and suppresses spurious transcription by RNA polymerase II (3,5). In addition to histone deacetylase activity, the SIN3 complex associates with histone methyltransferase (ESET), histone demethylase (JARID1A/RBP2), ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling (SWI/SNF), methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) activities, all of which appear to contribute to the regulation of target genes (5-9). The SIN3 complex is critical for proper regulation of embryonic development, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA methylation (imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation) (3,4).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mastermind-like (MAML) family of proteins are homologs of Drosophila Mastermind. The family is composed of three members in mammals: MAML1, MAML2, and MAML3 (1,2). MAML proteins form complexes with the intracellular domain of Notch (ICN) and the transcription factor CSL (RBP-Jκ) to regulate Notch target gene expression (3-5). MAML1 also interacts with myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) to regulate myogenesis (6). MAML2 is frequently found to be fused with Mucoepidermoid carcinoma translocated gene 1 (MECT1, also know as WAMTP1 or TORC1) in patients with mucoepidermoid carcinomas and Warthin's tumors (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The super elongation complex (SEC) plays a critical role in regulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation (1). The SEC is composed of AFF4, AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, and MLLT1/ENL proteins. The pathogenesis of mixed lineage leukemia is often associated with translocations of the SEC subunits joined to the histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferase mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene (1-4). The SEC has been found to contain RNAPII elongation factors eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia (ELL), ELL2, and ELL3, along with the associated factors EAF1 and EAF2, which can increase the catalytic rate of RNAPII transcription in vitro, (1,2,5-7). The SEC positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain within the largest subunit of RNAP II at Ser2 of the heptapeptide repeat. The SEC negative transcription elongation factors, DRB-induced stimulating factor (DSIF) and negative elongation factor (NELF), signal the transition from transcription initiation and pausing to productive transcription elongation (2,8-10). The chromosomal translocation of MLL with the members of the SEC leads to SEC recruitment to MLL regulated genes, such as the highly developmentally regulated Hox genes, implicating the misregulation and overexpression of these genes as underlying contributors to leukemogenesis (1,2,9,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Embryonic stem cells (ESC) derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst are unique in their pluripotent capacity and potential for self-renewal (1). Research studies demonstrate that a set of transcription factors that includes Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog forms a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Sox2 and Oct-4 bind to thousands of gene regulatory sites, many of which regulate cell pluripotency and early embryonic development (4,5). siRNA knockdown of either Sox2 or Oct-4 results in loss of pluripotency (6). Induced overexpression of Oct-4 and Sox2, along with additional transcription factors Klf4 and c-Myc, can reprogram both mouse and human somatic cells to a pluripotent state (7,8). Additional evidence demonstrates that Sox2 is also present in adult multipotent progenitors that give rise to some adult epithelial tissues, including several glands, the glandular stomach, testes, and cervix. Sox2 is thought to regulate target gene expression important for survival and regeneration of these tissues (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmits TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the recepter-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Briefly, activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved SSXS motif at the carboxy-terminus of the proteins. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad, Smad4, and together the complex moves to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).