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Monoclonal Antibody Chromatin Ip-Seq Tissue Development

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The orphan nuclear receptor, steroidogenic factor 1 (STF-1, also called Ad4BP), is encoded by the NR5A1 gene and plays an instrumental role in directing the transcriptional control of steroidogenesis (1). Initially identified as a tissue-specific transcriptional regulator of cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases, research studies of both global (2) and tissue-specific knockout mice (3-6) have demonstrated that STF-1 is required for the development of adrenal glands, gonads, ventromedial hypothalamus, and for the proper functioning of pituitary gonadotropes. Indeed, humans with mutations that render STF-1 transcriptionally inactive can present with testicular failure, ovarian failure, and adrenal insufficiency (7,8). Furthermore, dysregulation of STF-1 has been linked to diseases such as endometriosis (9) and adrenocortical carcinoma (10).Like other nuclear hormone receptors, STF-1 has a modular domain structure composed of an amino-terminal zinc finger DNA-binding domain, a ligand-binding domain, a carboxy-terminal AF-2 activation domain, and a hinge region with AF-1-like activation activity. STF-1 also contains a fushi tarazu factor 1 box, which functions as an accessory DNA binding domain (11). STF-1 is primarily phosphorylated at Ser203, which is thought to enhance its transcriptional activity by promoting complex formation with transcriptional cofactors (12). In addition to phosphorylation at Ser203, STF-1 is subject to SUMO conjugation and acetylation at ε-amino groups of target lysine residues. Whereas SUMOylation represses STF-1 function (13,14), acetylation enhances its transcriptional activity (15).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PR domain zinc finger protein 14 (PRDM14) is a likely protein lysine methyltransferase that is primarily expressed in primordial germ cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells. It is essential for the establishment and maintenance of primordial germ cells and critical for the maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (1-3). PRDM14 represses genes involved in the differentiation of stem cells into various cell lineages, likely via a combination of interactions with TET proteins, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and CBFA2T2 (3-8). In addition, overexpression of PRDM14 in combination with Jarid2 promotes induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation (9). PRDM14 protein levels are overexpressed in certain cancers, including breast, leukemia (T-ALL), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (10-13), and PRDM14 overexpression may serve as a novel prognostic marker in NSCLC (14). Targeting PRDM14 overexpression with a siRNA-based therapy was shown to decrease liver metastasis in a murine pancreatic cancer model, suggesting potential as a therapeutic option for cancers where this protein is abnormally expressed (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PR domain zinc finger protein 14 (PRDM14) is a likely protein lysine methyltransferase that is primarily expressed in primordial germ cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells. It is essential for the establishment and maintenance of primordial germ cells and critical for the maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (1-3). PRDM14 represses genes involved in the differentiation of stem cells into various cell lineages, likely via a combination of interactions with TET proteins, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and CBFA2T2 (3-8). In addition, overexpression of PRDM14 in combination with Jarid2 promotes induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation (9). PRDM14 protein levels are overexpressed in certain cancers, including breast, leukemia (T-ALL), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (10-13), and PRDM14 overexpression may serve as a novel prognostic marker in NSCLC (14). Targeting PRDM14 overexpression with a siRNA-based therapy was shown to decrease liver metastasis in a murine pancreatic cancer model, suggesting potential as a therapeutic option for cancers where this protein is abnormally expressed (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Embryonic stem cells (ESC) derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst are unique in their pluripotent capacity and potential for self-renewal (1). Research studies demonstrate that a set of transcription factors that includes Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog forms a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Sox2 and Oct-4 bind to thousands of gene regulatory sites, many of which regulate cell pluripotency and early embryonic development (4,5). siRNA knockdown of either Sox2 or Oct-4 results in loss of pluripotency (6). Induced overexpression of Oct-4 and Sox2, along with additional transcription factors Klf4 and c-Myc, can reprogram both mouse and human somatic cells to a pluripotent state (7,8). Additional evidence demonstrates that Sox2 is also present in adult multipotent progenitors that give rise to some adult epithelial tissues, including several glands, the glandular stomach, testes, and cervix. Sox2 is thought to regulate target gene expression important for survival and regeneration of these tissues (9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that plays a critical role in the cellular response to hypoxia (1). The HIF1 complex consists of two subunits, HIF-1α and HIF-1β, which are basic helix-loop-helix proteins of the PAS (Per, ARNT, Sim) family (2). HIF1 regulates the transcription of a broad range of genes that facilitate responses to the hypoxic environment, including genes regulating angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, cell cycle, metabolism, and apoptosis. The widely expressed HIF-1α is typically degraded rapidly in normoxic cells by the ubiquitin/proteasomal pathway. Under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is proline hydroxylated leading to a conformational change that promotes binding to the von Hippel Lindau protein (VHL) E3 ligase complex; ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation follows (3,4). Both hypoxic conditions and chemical hydroxylase inhibitors (such as desferrioxamine and cobalt) inhibit HIF-1α degradation and lead to its stabilization. In addition, HIF-1α can be induced in an oxygen-independent manner by various cytokines through the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway (5-7).HIF-1β is also known as AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) due to its ability to partner with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) to form a heterodimeric transcription factor complex (8). Together with AhR, HIF-1β plays an important role in xenobiotics metabolism (8). In addition, a chromosomal translocation leading to a TEL-ARNT fusion protein is associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (9). Studies also found that ARNT/HIF-1β expression levels decrease significantly in pancreatic islets from patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that HIF-1β plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell function (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Western Blotting

Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that plays a critical role in the cellular response to hypoxia (1). The HIF1 complex consists of two subunits, HIF-1α and HIF-1β, which are basic helix-loop-helix proteins of the PAS (Per, ARNT, Sim) family (2). HIF1 regulates the transcription of a broad range of genes that facilitate responses to the hypoxic environment, including genes regulating angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, cell cycle, metabolism, and apoptosis. The widely expressed HIF-1α is typically degraded rapidly in normoxic cells by the ubiquitin/proteasomal pathway. Under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is proline hydroxylated leading to a conformational change that promotes binding to the von Hippel Lindau protein (VHL) E3 ligase complex; ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation follows (3,4). Both hypoxic conditions and chemical hydroxylase inhibitors (such as desferrioxamine and cobalt) inhibit HIF-1α degradation and lead to its stabilization. In addition, HIF-1α can be induced in an oxygen-independent manner by various cytokines through the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway (5-7).HIF-1β is also known as AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) due to its ability to partner with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) to form a heterodimeric transcription factor complex (8). Together with AhR, HIF-1β plays an important role in xenobiotics metabolism (8). In addition, a chromosomal translocation leading to a TEL-ARNT fusion protein is associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (9). Studies also found that ARNT/HIF-1β expression levels decrease significantly in pancreatic islets from patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that HIF-1β plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell function (10).