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Monoclonal Antibody Clustering of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myelinated axons contain un-myelinated gaps called nodes of Ranvier. These regularly spaced gaps are critical for the proper propagation and rapid conduction of nerve impulses in the central and peripheral nervous system (1). The structure and organization of the nodes of Ranvier is dictated by interaction between the axon and glial cells (2). Voltage-gated sodium channels concentrated at the nodes and potassium channels clustered at the paranodes are responsible for propagation of the action potentials (3,4). Other proteins that contribute to the architecture and function of the nodes of Ranvier include βIV spectrin (5), ankyrin-G (6), and the L1 cell adhesion molecules, neurofascin and NrCAM (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2) is a type I transmembrane protein and member of the neurexin superfamily that mediates nervous system cell-cell interactions through the Neurexin IV-Caspr-Paranodin (NCP) complex (1). A multiprotein complex consisting of TAG-1, Caspr2, K+ channel, PSD95 and protein 4.1B mediates the molecular interactions at the juxtaparanodal region of myelinated axons, with homophilic TAG-1 interactions mediating the binding of this complex to glia (2,3).Caspr2 protein localizes to juxtaparanodal regions of myelinated axons where it forms a cis-complex with the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule TAG-1. Caspr2 also binds to Shaker K+ channels Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and their Kvβ2 subunit. A PDZ domain at the Caspr2 carboxy terminus mediates the Caspr2-K+ channel association. Caspr2 is required for proper K+ channel localization, as Caspr2 deletion causes the redistribution of channels along the internodes (1-3). Furthermore, Caspr2 binds to protein 4.1B and connects the protein complex to the axonal cytoskeleton (4). Mutations in the Caspr2 gene have been linked to focal epilepsy, cortical dysplasia and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (5,6).