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Monoclonal Antibody Detection of Peptidoglycan

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Detection of Peptidoglycan

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.