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Monoclonal Antibody Establishment of Spindle Orientation

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Establishment of Spindle Orientation

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: In Drosophila, lethal giant larvae (lgl), discs large (dlg), and scribble (scrib) act as tumor suppressor genes. Their loss of function in flies causes neoplastic overgrowth of larval brain tissue and imaginal epithelial cells hallmarked by disruption of the cytoskeletal network and cellular polarity (1,2). The human homolog of the Drosophila lgl protein, lethal giant larvae protein homolog 1(LLGL1), is a cytoskeletal protein implicated in regulating cellular organization, migration, and cell polarity (3). As in Drosophila, decreased expression of LLGL1 correlates with an increased incidence of cellular overgrowth and malignant transformation (4-6). In mammalian epithelial cells, LLGL1 redistributes from the cytoplasm to regions of cell-cell contact, allowing the establishment and maintainence of a polarized morphology (7). LLGL1 also plays a role in the formation of epithelial junctions via its direct interactions with PAR6 and aPKC, the latter of which has been shown to phosphorylate LLGL1 at Ser663, thus restricting its localization to the basolateral region of the cell (8). LLGL1 may also play an additional, unrealized role in cellular development and differentiation as indicated by the fact that Drosophila lgl has been implicated in controlling self-renewal and differentiation of progenitor cells (9). Recent studies in mice have suggested that a mammalian LLGL1 homolog that does not have tumor suppressor-like acitvity, LLGL2, is required for proper polarized invasion of trophoblasts and efficient branching morphogenesis during placental development (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) is a coiled coil protein involved in the formation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. NuMA plays a role in chromatin organization during interphase, which influences mammary epithelial differentiation (1,2). During apoptosis, carboxy-terminal cleavage of NuMA may amplify signaling in the cell death pathway (2). NuMA is phosphorylated at numerous sites, with phosphorylation at Ser395 occurring in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner in response to DNA damage (3,4).Phosphorylation at Thr2055 by CDK1 is required for spindle pole association of NuMA at the onset of mitosis. Dephosphorylation by PPP2CA leads to enhancement of NuMA at the cell cortex in anaphase and proper cell-cycle progression (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP. GEF-H1 is a Rho GEF that localizes to microtubules and regulates Rho activity in response to microtubule destabilization (1). Loss of interaction between GEF-H1 and microtubules leads to activation of Rho (2). Phosphorylation of GEF-H1 at Ser886 (Ser885 in mouse), a site located in the 14-3-3 binding motif, has been implicated in recruitment of 14-3-3 and GEF-H1 to microtubules (3), and in the regulation of RhoA activity in response to mitotic kinases during cytokinesis (4).GEF-H1 has also been shown to localize to tight junctions and modulate polarized cell permeability (5,6). GEF-H1 is inactivated by binding to cingulin at epithelial tight junctions, inactivating RhoA and leading to G1/S arrest (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP. GEF-H1 is a Rho GEF that localizes to microtubules and regulates Rho activity in response to microtubule destabilization (1). Loss of interaction between GEF-H1 and microtubules leads to activation of Rho (2). Phosphorylation of GEF-H1 at Ser886 (Ser885 in mouse), a site located in the 14-3-3 binding motif, has been implicated in recruitment of 14-3-3 and GEF-H1 to microtubules (3), and in the regulation of RhoA activity in response to mitotic kinases during cytokinesis (4).GEF-H1 has also been shown to localize to tight junctions and modulate polarized cell permeability (5,6). GEF-H1 is inactivated by binding to cingulin at epithelial tight junctions, inactivating RhoA and leading to G1/S arrest (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Sprouty (Spry) family of proteins are antagonists of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-induced signaling (1, 2). The Spry proteins play crucial roles in regulating growth and development of living organisms. Since originally discovered in Drosophila, four human orthologs of Spry proteins (Spry1-4) have been identified. All human Spry proteins possess a conserved carboxyl-terminal cysteine-rich SPR domain, which harbors a signal for protein translocation from cytosol to membrane ruffles (3,4). The SPR domain also enables the Spry proteins to form homo- or hetero-dimers and to interact with other proteins including kinases and phosphatases. The SPR domain is essential for the inhibitory modulation of Spry proteins on RTK signaling (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription and replication of the eukaryotic genome. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). CENP-A, also known as the chromatin-associated protein CSE4 (capping-enzyme suppressor 4-p), is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin (2). The greatest divergence between CENP-A and canonical histone H3 occurs in the amino-terminal tail of the protein, which binds linker DNA between nucleosomes and facilitates proper folding of centromeric heterochromatin (3). The amino-terminal tail of CENP-A is also required for recruitment of other centromeric proteins (CENP-C, hSMC1, hZW10), proper kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis (4). Additional sequence divergence in the histone fold domain is responsible for correct targeting of CENP-A to the centromere (5). Many of the functions of CENP-A are regulated by phosphorylation (6,7). Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of CENP-A on Ser7 during prophase is required for proper targeting of Aurora B to the inner centromere in prometaphase, proper kinetochore/microtubule attachment and proper alignment of chromosomes during mitosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Spry1 is a member of the Sprouty (Spry) family proteins that was initially identified in Drosophila as an inhibitor of the FGF signaling pathway (1). There are four human Spry proteins (Spry1-4), encoded by different genes, and they all share a highly conserved carboxy-terminal cystine-rich Spry domain that is known to be essential for their receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitory function stimulated by various growth factors (1-3). Spry1 and other Spry proteins play a key role in embryonic development, tissue and organ formation, as well as growth in almost all living organisms (1-4). Spry proteins are considered tumor suppressors due to their inhibitory function in a variety of growth factor signaling pathways (2,3). Spry1 anchors itself to the membrane by palmitoylation and can translocate from the cytosol to the membrane by binding to caveolin-1 (5,6). Regulation of Spry1 protein function is thought to occur at various levels. Spry1 regulation includes transcriptional regulation by growth factors and kinases (1,4,7), post-transcriptional regulation by microRNA-21 (8), post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, and regulation by its interacting protein partners (2,3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription and replication of the eukaryotic genome. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). CENP-A, also known as the chromatin-associated protein CSE4 (capping-enzyme suppressor 4-p), is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin (2). The greatest divergence between CENP-A and canonical histone H3 occurs in the amino-terminal tail of the protein, which binds linker DNA between nucleosomes and facilitates proper folding of centromeric heterochromatin (3). The amino-terminal tail of CENP-A is also required for recruitment of other centromeric proteins (CENP-C, hSMC1, hZW10), proper kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis (4). Additional sequence divergence in the histone fold domain is responsible for correct targeting of CENP-A to the centromere (5). Many of the functions of CENP-A are regulated by phosphorylation (6,7). Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of CENP-A on Ser7 during prophase is required for proper targeting of Aurora B to the inner centromere in prometaphase, proper kinetochore/microtubule attachment and proper alignment of chromosomes during mitosis (6).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by psychiatric, cognitive, and motor dysfunction. Neuropathology of HD involves specific neuronal subpopulations: GABA-ergic neurons of the striatum and neurons within the cerebral cortex selectively degenerate (1,2). The genetic analysis of HD has been the flagship study of inherited neurological diseases from initial chromosomal localization to identification of the gene.Huntingtin is a large (340-350 kD) cytosolic protein that may be involved in a number of cellular functions such as transcription, gastrulation, neurogenesis, neurotransmission, axonal transport, neural positioning, and apoptosis (2,3). The HD gene from unaffected individuals contains between 6 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats, with expansion beyond this range causing the onset of disease symptoms. A strong inverse correlation exists between the age of onset in patients and the number of huntingtin gene CAG repeats encoding a stretch of polyglutamine peptides (1,2). The huntingtin protein undergoes numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, palmitoylation, and cleavage (2). Phosphorylation of Ser421 by Akt can partially counteract the toxicity that results from the expanded polyglutamine tract. Varying Akt expression in the brain correlates with regional differences in huntingtin protein phosphorylation; this pattern inversely correlates with the regions that are most affected by degeneration in diseased brain (2). A key step in the disease is the proteolytic cleavage of huntingtin protein into amino-terminal fragments that contain expanded glutamine repeats and translocate into the nucleus. Caspase mediated cleavage of huntingtin at Asp513 is associated with increased polyglutamine aggregate formation and toxicity. Phosphorylation of Ser434 by CDK5 protects against cleavage (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Spry1 is a member of the Sprouty (Spry) family proteins that was initially identified in Drosophila as an inhibitor of the FGF signaling pathway (1). There are four human Spry proteins (Spry1-4), encoded by different genes, and they all share a highly conserved carboxy-terminal cystine-rich Spry domain that is known to be essential for their receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitory function stimulated by various growth factors (1-3). Spry1 and other Spry proteins play a key role in embryonic development, tissue and organ formation, as well as growth in almost all living organisms (1-4). Spry proteins are considered tumor suppressors due to their inhibitory function in a variety of growth factor signaling pathways (2,3). Spry1 anchors itself to the membrane by palmitoylation and can translocate from the cytosol to the membrane by binding to caveolin-1 (5,6). Regulation of Spry1 protein function is thought to occur at various levels. Spry1 regulation includes transcriptional regulation by growth factors and kinases (1,4,7), post-transcriptional regulation by microRNA-21 (8), post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, and regulation by its interacting protein partners (2,3).