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Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Cell Growth

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members are negative regulators of cytokine signal transduction that inhibit the Jak/Stat pathway (1-3). The SOCS family consists of at least 8 members including the originally identified cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS1), as well as SOCS1-7. Each SOCS family member contains a central SH2 domain and a conserved carboxy-terminal motif designated as the SOCS box. These proteins are important regulators of cytokine signaling, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is also known as estrogen receptor-binding fragment-associated gene 9 (EBAG9). Originally identified as an estrogen-inducible gene (1), RCAS1 was recently found to play a novel role in the adaptive immune response by negatively regulating the cytolytic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) (2). RCAS1 is conserved in phylogeny and is ubiquitously expressed in most human tissues and cells (3,4). There is evidence that tissue expression of RCAS1 is increased in a variety of malignancies, including cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, breast, ovary, endometrium, and cervix. Research studies have shown that levels of RCAS1 tissue expression are negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients harboring the aforementioned malignancies (4). It is also noteworthy that research studies have detected elevated levels of RCAS1 in the sera of cancer patients (4). Initial studies indicated that RCAS1 was secreted from cancer cells and functioned as a ligand for a putative receptor expressed on NK cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes, inducing their apoptosis, which enabled cancer cells to evade immune surveillance (5,6). Subsequent studies have identified RCAS1 as a type III transmembrane Golgi protein with the ability to regulate vesicle formation, secretion, and protein glycosylation (2,7-9). Indeed, it has been shown that RCAS1 overexpression negatively regulates the cytolytic function of CTLs by negatively regulating protein trafficking from the trans-Golgi to secretory lysosomes (2). Furthermore, RCAS1 overexpression delays vesicle transport from the ER to Golgi and causes components of the ER quality control and glycosylation machinery to mislocalize. As a consequence, RCAS1 induces the deposition of tumor-associated glycan antigens on the cell surface, which are thought to contribute to tumor pathogenesis through the mediation of adhesion, invasion, and metastasis (8,9).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RCAS1 (D2B6N) XP® Rabbit mAb #12290.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Receptor binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is also known as estrogen receptor-binding fragment-associated gene 9 (EBAG9). Originally identified as an estrogen-inducible gene (1), RCAS1 was recently found to play a novel role in the adaptive immune response by negatively regulating the cytolytic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) (2). RCAS1 is conserved in phylogeny and is ubiquitously expressed in most human tissues and cells (3,4). There is evidence that tissue expression of RCAS1 is increased in a variety of malignancies, including cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, breast, ovary, endometrium, and cervix. Research studies have shown that levels of RCAS1 tissue expression are negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients harboring the aforementioned malignancies (4). It is also noteworthy that research studies have detected elevated levels of RCAS1 in the sera of cancer patients (4). Initial studies indicated that RCAS1 was secreted from cancer cells and functioned as a ligand for a putative receptor expressed on NK cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes, inducing their apoptosis, which enabled cancer cells to evade immune surveillance (5,6). Subsequent studies have identified RCAS1 as a type III transmembrane Golgi protein with the ability to regulate vesicle formation, secretion, and protein glycosylation (2,7-9). Indeed, it has been shown that RCAS1 overexpression negatively regulates the cytolytic function of CTLs by negatively regulating protein trafficking from the trans-Golgi to secretory lysosomes (2). Furthermore, RCAS1 overexpression delays vesicle transport from the ER to Golgi and causes components of the ER quality control and glycosylation machinery to mislocalize. As a consequence, RCAS1 induces the deposition of tumor-associated glycan antigens on the cell surface, which are thought to contribute to tumor pathogenesis through the mediation of adhesion, invasion, and metastasis (8,9).

$199
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclic ADP-ribose hydrolase 1 (CD38) is a transmembrane protein involved in several important biological processes, including immune response, insulin secretion, and social behavior. Originally described as a glycosylated immune cell surface marker, additional research determined that CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and hydrolysis of cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) from NAD (1,2). Under acidic conditions, CD38 also catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) from NADP+. Both cADPR and NAADP act as calcium ion mobilizing messengers that target different intracellular Ca2+ stores (3-6). Since CD38 is the primary mammalian NAD+ glycohydrolase responsible for NAD+ metabolism, CD38 may be a valuable therapeutic target for treatment of metabolic diseases regulated by NAD+-dependent pathways (7,8). CD38 has also been considered a possible therapeutic target for antibody-mediated therapy for myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (9-11).

$159
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclic ADP-ribose hydrolase 1 (CD38) is a transmembrane protein involved in several important biological processes, including immune response, insulin secretion, and social behavior. Originally described as a glycosylated immune cell surface marker, additional research determined that CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and hydrolysis of cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) from NAD (1,2). Under acidic conditions, CD38 also catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) from NADP+. Both cADPR and NAADP act as calcium ion mobilizing messengers that target different intracellular Ca2+ stores (3-6). Since CD38 is the primary mammalian NAD+ glycohydrolase responsible for NAD+ metabolism, CD38 may be a valuable therapeutic target for treatment of metabolic diseases regulated by NAD+-dependent pathways (7,8). CD38 has also been considered a possible therapeutic target for antibody-mediated therapy for myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CD71 (D7G9X) XP® Rabbit mAb #13113.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Transferrin receptor 1 (CD71, TFRC) is a type II transmembrane receptor and carrier protein responsible for the uptake of cellular iron through receptor-mediated endocytosis (1). Neutral pH at the cell surface promotes binding of the iron-binding glycoprotein transferrin (Tf) to the CD71 receptor. The receptor-ligand complex enters the cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis and is internalized into an endosome. Relatively lower endosomal pH leads to a change in the local charge environment surrounding the iron-transferrin binding site and results in the release of iron (2). The receptor-ligand complex is recycled to the cell surface where transferrin dissociates from the CD71 receptor (2). Ubiquitously expressed transferrin receptor is continuously recycled and undergoes clathrin-mediated endocytosis regardless of ligand binding state. The interaction between receptor and ligand has been studied in detail. The helical domain of CD71 directly interacts with the transferrin C-lobe and induces a conformation change in Tf to facilitate the transport process (3). Interaction between the receptor CD71 and transferrin is mediated by the membrane protein hemochromatosis (HFE). HFE binds the α-helical domain of CD71, blocking formation of the CD71-transferrin complex and inhibiting iron uptake (4,5). In addition to binding transferrin, CD71 also interacts with H-ferritin at the cell surface and transports this intracellular iron storage protein to cellular endosomes and lysosomes (6). Additional studies indicate that the transferrin receptor is an evolutionarily conserved receptor for a number or arenaviruses and at least one retrovirus (7,8). Aberrant expression of CD71 is seen in a number of cancers, including thyroid carcinomas, lymphomas, and T-lineage leukemias, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for targeted inhibition of the transferrin receptor (9,10).

$349
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PerCP-Cy5.5® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclic ADP-ribose hydrolase 1 (CD38) is a transmembrane protein involved in several important biological processes, including immune response, insulin secretion, and social behavior. Originally described as a glycosylated immune cell surface marker, additional research determined that CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and hydrolysis of cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) from NAD (1,2). Under acidic conditions, CD38 also catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) from NADP+. Both cADPR and NAADP act as calcium ion mobilizing messengers that target different intracellular Ca2+ stores (3-6). Since CD38 is the primary mammalian NAD+ glycohydrolase responsible for NAD+ metabolism, CD38 may be a valuable therapeutic target for treatment of metabolic diseases regulated by NAD+-dependent pathways (7,8). CD38 has also been considered a possible therapeutic target for antibody-mediated therapy for myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (9-11).

$129
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to FITC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclic ADP-ribose hydrolase 1 (CD38) is a transmembrane protein involved in several important biological processes, including immune response, insulin secretion, and social behavior. Originally described as a glycosylated immune cell surface marker, additional research determined that CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and hydrolysis of cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) from NAD (1,2). Under acidic conditions, CD38 also catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) from NADP+. Both cADPR and NAADP act as calcium ion mobilizing messengers that target different intracellular Ca2+ stores (3-6). Since CD38 is the primary mammalian NAD+ glycohydrolase responsible for NAD+ metabolism, CD38 may be a valuable therapeutic target for treatment of metabolic diseases regulated by NAD+-dependent pathways (7,8). CD38 has also been considered a possible therapeutic target for antibody-mediated therapy for myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (9-11).

$329
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to violetFluor™ 450 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclic ADP-ribose hydrolase 1 (CD38) is a transmembrane protein involved in several important biological processes, including immune response, insulin secretion, and social behavior. Originally described as a glycosylated immune cell surface marker, additional research determined that CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and hydrolysis of cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) from NAD (1,2). Under acidic conditions, CD38 also catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) from NADP+. Both cADPR and NAADP act as calcium ion mobilizing messengers that target different intracellular Ca2+ stores (3-6). Since CD38 is the primary mammalian NAD+ glycohydrolase responsible for NAD+ metabolism, CD38 may be a valuable therapeutic target for treatment of metabolic diseases regulated by NAD+-dependent pathways (7,8). CD38 has also been considered a possible therapeutic target for antibody-mediated therapy for myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (9-11).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-4) are a family of widely expressed Ser/Thr kinases characterized by two nonidentical, functional kinase domains (1) and a carboxy-terminal docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) (2). Several sites both within and outside of the RSK kinase domain, including Ser380, Thr359, Ser363, and Thr573, are important for kinase activation (3). RSK1-3 are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by MAPKs, autophosphorylation, and phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) in response to many growth factors, polypeptide hormones, and neurotransmitters (3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Bcl-2 (124) Mouse mAb #15071.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S100A8 and S100A9 are calcium-binding proteins that form a noncovalent heterodimer present in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and some epithelial cells (1, 2). S100A8 and S100A9 are secreted by a tubulin-dependent mechanism during inflammatory conditions and have antimicrobial and chemotactic functions (3-5). Extracellular S100A8/S100A9 also induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells, including induction of proinflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules and increased vascular permeability (6). S100A8/S100A9 induces and recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing mice (7). MDSC produce additional S100A8/S100A9 themselves, resulting in a positive feedback mechanism that sustains MDSC accumulation (7). S100A8/S100A9 is also highly expressed in psoriatic skin, where it directly upregulates transcription of complement protein C3, which contributes to disease (8). In addition, tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in cancer cells, which increases invasiveness and metastasis (9).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated S100A9 (D5O6O) Rabbit mAb #72590.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: S100A8 and S100A9 are calcium-binding proteins that form a noncovalent heterodimer present in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and some epithelial cells (1, 2). S100A8 and S100A9 are secreted by a tubulin-dependent mechanism during inflammatory conditions and have antimicrobial and chemotactic functions (3-5). Extracellular S100A8/S100A9 also induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells, including induction of proinflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules and increased vascular permeability (6). S100A8/S100A9 induces and recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing mice (7). MDSC produce additional S100A8/S100A9 themselves, resulting in a positive feedback mechanism that sustains MDSC accumulation (7). S100A8/S100A9 is also highly expressed in psoriatic skin, where it directly upregulates transcription of complement protein C3, which contributes to disease (8). In addition, tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in cancer cells, which increases invasiveness and metastasis (9).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated FoxM1 (D3F2B) Rabbit mAb #20459.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-p53 (Ser15) (16G8) Mouse mAb #9286.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).