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Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Metaphase Plate Congression

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Mitotic Metaphase Plate Congression

$305
50 tests
100 µl
Cell Signaling Technology Antibody conjugated to Alexa Fluor ® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct Flow Cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody, #4135, reacts with human and mouse. CST expects that Cyclin B1 (V152) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor®488 conjugate) will also recognize Cyclin B1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
Cell Signaling Technology Antibody conjugated to Alexa Fluor®647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct Flow Cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #4135 reacts with, among others, human, mouse and hamster Cyclin B1. CST expects that Cyclin B1 Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor®647 conjugate) will also recognize Cyclin B1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: CENP-F (mitosin), is a kinetochore-associated protein whose expression and localization to chromatin is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, with its highest expression in G2/M phases (1, 2). CENP-F is required for appropriate localization of other kinetocore-associated proteins, including CENP-E. CENP-F regulates kinetocore function and maintenance of the mitotic spindle checkpoint. Farnesylation of CENP-F is required for its localization and function (3). CENP-F also interacts with the mitochondrial protein, miro, to direct the distribution of mitochondria to daughter cells as they exit mitosis (4). Researchers have shown that CENP-F drives prostate tumor growth synergistically with FOXM1 in human and mouse (5), and that the gene for CENP-F is among those frequently amplified in hepatocellular, head and neck, and esophageal carcinomas (6-8). CENP-F expression has also been shown in research studies to be associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mismatch repair (MMR), a conserved process that involves correcting errors made during DNA synthesis, is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity. MLH1 is the human homologue of the E. coli MMR gene mutL. MMR requires recognition of a base mismatch or insertion/deletion loop by a MutS homolog followed by recruitment of a MutL heterodimeric complex consisting of MLH1 and PMS1 (MutL-γ), PMS2 (MutL-α) or MLH3 (MutL-γ). Other factors required for MMR in eukaryotes are EXO1, PCNA, RFC, RPA, DNA polymerases and DNA ligase (reviewed in 1). Inactivation of the MLH1 gene causes genome instability and predisposition to cancer (2-5). The MLH1 gene is frequently mutated in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) (6). MLH1 also plays a role in meiotic recombination (7).