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Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Mouse

$119
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human and mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: CD44 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction through its affinity for hyaluronic acid (HA) and possibly through other parts of the extracellular matrix (ECM). CD44 is highly polymorphic, possesses a number of alternative splice variants and undergoes extensive post-translational modifications (1,2). Increased surface levels of CD44 are characteristic of T cell activation, and expression of the protein is upregulated during the inflammatory response. Research studies have shown that interactions between CD44 and HER2 are linked to an increase in ovarian carcinoma cell growth (1-3). CD44 interacts with ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM), linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane and the ECM (4-6). CD44 is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser325 in resting cells. Activation of PKC results in phosphorylation of Ser291, dephosphorylation of Ser325, disassociation of ezrin from CD44, and directional motility (4).

$129
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to FITC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human and mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: CD44 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction through its affinity for hyaluronic acid (HA) and possibly through other parts of the extracellular matrix (ECM). CD44 is highly polymorphic, possesses a number of alternative splice variants and undergoes extensive post-translational modifications (1,2). Increased surface levels of CD44 are characteristic of T cell activation, and expression of the protein is upregulated during the inflammatory response. Research studies have shown that interactions between CD44 and HER2 are linked to an increase in ovarian carcinoma cell growth (1-3). CD44 interacts with ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM), linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane and the ECM (4-6). CD44 is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser325 in resting cells. Activation of PKC results in phosphorylation of Ser291, dephosphorylation of Ser325, disassociation of ezrin from CD44, and directional motility (4).

$159
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human and mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: CD44 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction through its affinity for hyaluronic acid (HA) and possibly through other parts of the extracellular matrix (ECM). CD44 is highly polymorphic, possesses a number of alternative splice variants and undergoes extensive post-translational modifications (1,2). Increased surface levels of CD44 are characteristic of T cell activation, and expression of the protein is upregulated during the inflammatory response. Research studies have shown that interactions between CD44 and HER2 are linked to an increase in ovarian carcinoma cell growth (1-3). CD44 interacts with ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM), linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane and the ECM (4-6). CD44 is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser325 in resting cells. Activation of PKC results in phosphorylation of Ser291, dephosphorylation of Ser325, disassociation of ezrin from CD44, and directional motility (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GAPDH (14C10) Rabbit mAb #2118.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor ® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated Phospho-Stat3 (Tyr705) (D3A7) XP® Rabbit mAb #9145 reacts with Phospho-Stat3 (Tyr705) from human, mouse and rat. CST expects that Phospho-Stat3 (Tyr705) (D3A7) XP® Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize Phospho-Stat3 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Stat3 transcription factor is an important signaling molecule for many cytokines and growth factor receptors (1) and is required for murine fetal development (2). Research studies have shown that Stat3 is constitutively activated in a number of human tumors (3,4) and possesses oncogenic potential (5) and anti-apoptotic activities (3). Stat3 is activated by phosphorylation at Tyr705, which induces dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (6,7). Transcriptional activation seems to be regulated by phosphorylation at Ser727 through the MAPK or mTOR pathways (8,9). Stat3 isoform expression appears to reflect biological function as the relative expression levels of Stat3α (86 kDa) and Stat3β (79 kDa) depend on cell type, ligand exposure, or cell maturation stage (10). It is notable that Stat3β lacks the serine phosphorylation site within the carboxy-terminal transcriptional activation domain (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated antibody (p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) (137F5) Rabbit mAb #4695).
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, Dog, Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-NF-κB p65 (Ser536) (93H1) Rabbit mAb #3033.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-NDRG1 (Thr346) (D98G11) XP® Rabbit mAb #5482.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), also termed Cap43, Drg1, RTP/rit42, and Proxy-1, is a member of the NDRG family, which is composed of four members (NDRG1-4) that function in growth, differentiation, and cell survival (1-5). NDRG1 is ubiquitously expressed and highly responsive to a variety of stress signals including DNA damage (4), hypoxia (5), and elevated levels of nickel and calcium (2). Expression of NDRG1 is elevated in N-myc defective mice and is negatively regulated by N- and c-myc (1,6). During DNA damage, NDRG1 is induced in a p53-dependent fashion and is necessary for p53-mediated apoptosis (4,7). Research studies have shown that NDRG1 may also play a role in cancer progression by promoting differentiation, inhibiting growth, and modulating metastasis and angiogenesis (3,4,6,8,9). Nonsense mutation of the NDRG1 gene has been shown to cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (HMSNL), which is supported by studies demonstrating the role of NDRG1 in maintaining myelin sheaths and axonal survival (10,11). NDRG1 is up-regulated during mast cell maturation and its deletion leads to attenuated allergic responses (12). Both NDRG1 and NDRG2 are substrates of SGK1, although the precise physiological role of SGK1-mediated phosphorylation is not known (13). NDRG1 is phosphorylated by SGK1 at Thr328, Ser330, Thr346, Thr356, and Thr366. Phosphorylation by SGK1 primes NDRG1 for phosphorylation by GSK-3.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CACYBP/SIP) is a component of the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex that also contains Siah1, Skp1, and Ebi (1). CACYBP regulates β-catenin turnover and plays an important role in thymocyte development (2). CACYBP also binds to tubulin and may be involved in cytoskeletal regulation (3,4). It is highly expressed in neurons, and its cellular localization may be regulated by Ca2+ (5,6). Retinoic acid treatment of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induces translocation of CACYBP to the nucleus and seems to be correlated with phosphorylation of CACYBP on serine residues (7). Recent studies also suggest that CACYBP may possess phosphatase activity (8), and that it can bind and dephosphorylate Erk1/2 (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism, and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). hnRNP A1 regulates the alternative splicing of c-Src and c-H-Ras (2,3) and modifies initiation of translation of the fibroblast growth factor 2 mRNA (4). hnRNP A1 expression level is elevated in many cancers; knockdown of hnRNP A1 leads to apoptosis in various cancer cells (5). Although predominantly nuclear, hnRNP A1 is continually transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it disassociates from mRNA and is rapidly re-imported into the nucleus (6,7). hnRNP A1 binds to cis-acting repressive sequences (CRS) of HIV-1 to influence HIV-1 production (8,9). HIV-1 enhances hnRNP A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm (10).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated LC3B (D11) XP® Rabbit mAb #3868.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but it has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegenerative diseases, infection, and cancer (3). Autophagy marker Light Chain 3 (LC3) was originally identified as a subunit of microtubule-associated proteins 1A and 1B (termed MAP1LC3) (4) and subsequently found to contain similarity to the yeast protein Apg8/Aut7/Cvt5 critical for autophagy (5). Three human LC3 isoforms (LC3A, LC3B, and LC3C) undergo post-translational modifications during autophagy (6-9). Cleavage of LC3 at the carboxy terminus immediately following synthesis yields the cytosolic LC3-I form. During autophagy, LC3-I is converted to LC3-II through lipidation by a ubiquitin-like system involving Atg7 and Atg3 that allows for LC3 to become associated with autophagic vesicles (6-10). The presence of LC3 in autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3 to the lower migrating form, LC3-II, have been used as indicators of autophagy (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pirin is a highly conserved nuclear protein and a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins, all of which contain two conserved β-barrel fold domains (1). Pirin functions as a co-factor for NFI/CTF1 and Bcl-3, implicating it in DNA replication, transcriptional activation and apoptosis (2,3). Both human and bacterial pirins catalyze the di-oxygenation of quercetin, one of a class of widespread naturally occurring flavenoid compounds that have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities (4). Flavenoids exert these beneficial activities by functioning as antioxidants that stabilize cellular free radical molecules and by directly modulating cell signaling pathways involving PI 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, PKC and MAP kinases (5). Quercetin has also been directly implicated in the regulation of NF-κB activity; thus, Pirin may exert its apoptotic functions both by directly regulating Bcl-3/NF-κB activity and by modulating quercetin levels in the cell (6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is also known as estrogen receptor-binding fragment-associated gene 9 (EBAG9). Originally identified as an estrogen-inducible gene (1), RCAS1 was recently found to play a novel role in the adaptive immune response by negatively regulating the cytolytic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) (2). RCAS1 is conserved in phylogeny and is ubiquitously expressed in most human tissues and cells (3,4). There is evidence that tissue expression of RCAS1 is increased in a variety of malignancies, including cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, breast, ovary, endometrium, and cervix. Research studies have shown that levels of RCAS1 tissue expression are negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients harboring the aforementioned malignancies (4). It is also noteworthy that research studies have detected elevated levels of RCAS1 in the sera of cancer patients (4). Initial studies indicated that RCAS1 was secreted from cancer cells and functioned as a ligand for a putative receptor expressed on NK cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes, inducing their apoptosis, which enabled cancer cells to evade immune surveillance (5,6). Subsequent studies have identified RCAS1 as a type III transmembrane Golgi protein with the ability to regulate vesicle formation, secretion, and protein glycosylation (2,7-9). Indeed, it has been shown that RCAS1 overexpression negatively regulates the cytolytic function of CTLs by negatively regulating protein trafficking from the trans-Golgi to secretory lysosomes (2). Furthermore, RCAS1 overexpression delays vesicle transport from the ER to Golgi and causes components of the ER quality control and glycosylation machinery to mislocalize. As a consequence, RCAS1 induces the deposition of tumor-associated glycan antigens on the cell surface, which are thought to contribute to tumor pathogenesis through the mediation of adhesion, invasion, and metastasis (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated c-Fos (9F6) Rabbit mAb #2250.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Granzymes are a family of serine proteases expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells and are key components of immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells (1). Granzymes are synthesized as zymogens and are processed into mature enzymes by cleavage of a leader sequence. They are released by exocytosis in lysosome-like granules containing perforin, a membrane pore-forming protein. Granzyme B has the strongest apoptotic activity of all the granzymes as a result of its caspase-like ability to cleave substrates at aspartic acid residues thereby activating procaspases directly and cleaving downstream caspase substrates (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EGR1 (44D5) Rabbit mAb #4154.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: EGR family members are transcriptional factors that contain three repetitive zinc finger DNA binding domains which bind to EGR response elements (ER) to regulate target gene expression (1). The expression of EGR family members is induced by growth factors, with EGR1 expression being induced by NGF (1,2). Increased EGR1 expression activates transcription of other signaling molecules, including CDK5 and tyrosine hydroxylase, and exerts long term effects on neural cell growth and differentiation (2,3).