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Monoclonal Antibody Gene Silencing

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of gene expression in higher eukaryotes (1,2). Several classes of small RNAs, including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (3), microRNAs (miRNAs) (4), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) (5), have been identified. MicroRNAs are about 21 nucleotides in length and have been implicated in many cellular processes such as development, differentiation, and stress response (1,2). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by modulating mRNA translation or stability (2). MicroRNAs function together with the protein components in the complexes called micro-ribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) (2). Among the most important components in these complexes are Argonaute proteins (1,2). There are four members in the mammalian Argonaute family and only Argonaute 2 (Ago2) possesses the Slicer endonuclease activity (1,2). Argonaute proteins participate in the various steps of microRNA-mediated gene silencing, such as repression of translation and mRNA turnover (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of gene expression in higher eukaryotes (1,2). Several classes of small RNAs, including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (3), microRNAs (miRNAs) (4), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) (5), have been identified. MicroRNAs are about 21 nucleotides in length and have been implicated in many cellular processes such as development, differentiation, and stress response (1,2). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by modulating mRNA translation or stability (2). MicroRNAs function together with the protein components in the complexes called micro-ribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) (2). Among the most important components in these complexes are Argonaute proteins (1,2). There are four members in the mammalian Argonaute family and only Argonaute 2 (Ago2) possesses the Slicer endonuclease activity (1,2). Argonaute proteins participate in the various steps of microRNA-mediated gene silencing, such as repression of translation and mRNA turnover (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of gene expression in higher eukaryotes (1,2). Several classes of small RNAs, including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (3), microRNAs (miRNAs) (4), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) (5), have been identified. MicroRNAs are about 21 nucleotides in length and have been implicated in many cellular processes such as development, differentiation, and stress response (1,2). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by modulating mRNA translation or stability (2). MicroRNAs function together with the protein components in the complexes called micro-ribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) (2). Among the most important components in these complexes are Argonaute proteins (1,2). There are four members in the mammalian Argonaute family and only Argonaute 2 (Ago2) possesses the Slicer endonuclease activity (1,2). Argonaute proteins participate in the various steps of microRNA-mediated gene silencing, such as repression of translation and mRNA turnover (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of gene expression in higher eukaryotes (1,2). Several classes of small RNAs, including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (3), microRNAs (miRNAs) (4), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) (5), have been identified. MicroRNAs are about 21 nucleotides in length and have been implicated in many cellular processes such as development, differentiation, and stress response (1,2). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by modulating mRNA translation or stability (2). MicroRNAs function together with the protein components in the complexes called micro-ribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) (2). Among the most important components in these complexes are Argonaute proteins (1,2). There are four members in the mammalian Argonaute family and only Argonaute 2 (Ago2) possesses the Slicer endonuclease activity (1,2). Argonaute proteins participate in the various steps of microRNA-mediated gene silencing, such as repression of translation and mRNA turnover (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT2, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, deacetylates α-tubulin at Lys40 and histone H4 at Lys16 and has been implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and progression through mitosis (2,3). SirT2 protein is mainly cytoplasmic and is associated with microtubules and HDAC6, another tubulin deacetylase (2). Deacetylation of α-tubulin decreases its stability and may be required for proper regulation of cell shape, intracellular transport, cell motility, and cell division (2,4). The abundance and phosphorylation state of SirT2 increase at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle, and SirT2 relocalizes to chromatin during mitosis when histone H4 Lys16 acetylation levels decrease (3,5). Overexpression of SirT2 prolongs mitosis, while overexpression of the CDC14B phosphatase results in both decreased phosphorylation and abundance of SirT2, allowing for proper mitotic exit (5). Thus, the deacetylation of both histone H4 and α-tubulin by SirT2 may be critical for proper chromatin and cytoskeletal dynamics required for completion of mitosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT2, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, deacetylates α-tubulin at Lys40 and histone H4 at Lys16 and has been implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and progression through mitosis (2,3). SirT2 protein is mainly cytoplasmic and is associated with microtubules and HDAC6, another tubulin deacetylase (2). Deacetylation of α-tubulin decreases its stability and may be required for proper regulation of cell shape, intracellular transport, cell motility, and cell division (2,4). The abundance and phosphorylation state of SirT2 increase at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle, and SirT2 relocalizes to chromatin during mitosis when histone H4 Lys16 acetylation levels decrease (3,5). Overexpression of SirT2 prolongs mitosis, while overexpression of the CDC14B phosphatase results in both decreased phosphorylation and abundance of SirT2, allowing for proper mitotic exit (5). Thus, the deacetylation of both histone H4 and α-tubulin by SirT2 may be critical for proper chromatin and cytoskeletal dynamics required for completion of mitosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Trans-activation response (TAR) RNA binding protein (TRBP2) was initially discovered as a double stranded RNA binding protein (dsRBP) that bound TAR RNA sequences of the HIV-1 virus (1, 2). TRBP2 can bind to and inhibit the phosphorylation of protein kinase PKR, which leads to increased activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (3,4). Along with PACT, TRBP2 is one of the dsRBPs in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), where it plays a critical role in recruiting Ago2 to the miRNA bound by Dicer. (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex regulates mRNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells (1). This regulation occurs at different levels of mRNA synthesis and degradation, including transcription initiation, elongation, deadenylation, and degradation (1). Multiple components, including CNOT1, CNOT2, CNOT3, CNOT4, CNOT6, CNOT6L, CNOT7, CNOT8, CNOT9, and CNOT10 have been identified in this complex (2). In addition, subunit composition of this complex has been shown to vary among different tissues (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1) associates with the 3' poly(A) tail of mRNA and also eIF4F (1,2). eIF4F is a complex whose functions include the recognition of the mRNA 5' cap structure (eIF4E), delivery of an RNA helicase to the 5' region (eIF4A), bridging of the mRNA and the ribosome (eIF4G), and circularization of the mRNA via interaction between eIF4G and the poly(A) binding protein (PABP). PABP1 has been shown to have multiple functions including translation initiation, mRNA stabilization, and mRNA turnover (3,4). Phosphorylation of PABP has been shown to enhance RNA binding in eukaryotes, and PABP1 has been shown to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm (5,6). PABP1 is methylated on Arg455 and Arg460 by the CARM1 protein methyltransferase (7,8); however, the function of this methylation has yet to be determined.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PACT (protein activator of protein kinase R) is a double stranded RNA binding protein and a cellular activator of PKR (protein kinase R), a kinase that mediates the antiviral and antiproliferative actions of interferon (1). Stress signals such as serum starvation and arsenite treatment induces PACT to heterodimerize with PKR, resulting in the phosphorylation of eIF-2α and inhibition of protein synthesis (1,2). PACT has also been shown to play a role in RNA-mediated gene silencing by stimulating the activity of Dicer, thereby affecting the efficiency of miRNA accumulation and siRNA gene silencing (3,4). More recently, PACT has been shown to interact with RIG-I, a sensor of viral nucleic acids, and stimulates RIG-I-induced type I interferon production (5). Researchers have found that mutations in PACT are associated with dystonia, a movement disorder where patients develop involuntary muscle contractions and postures (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Post-transcriptional processing of RNAs such as RNA editing is an important mechanism by which diversity in RNA and protein is achieved that is not otherwise encoded by the genome (1,2). The most common form of RNA editing is the conversion of adenosine (A) into inosine (I) on double stranded RNA by the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins (1-3). Since inosine base pairs with cytidine, it is interpreted as a guanosine by the splicing and translational machinery leading to alteration in the protein sequence, as well as splicing isoforms being generated (1,4-6). A-to-I editing can also influence RNA sequence recognition by RNA binding proteins and non-coding RNA, such as miRNAs, affecting subsequent RNA processing, stability, and protein expression levels (2).ADAR1 is ubiquitously expressed with two known isoforms ADAR1L (p150) and ADAR1S (p110) resulting from transcription using alternative promoters and start codons. ADAR1S is constitutively expressed in the nucleus, while ADAR1L is interferon-inducible and present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The induction of ADAR1L in response to cellular stress and viral infection suggests a role for RNA editing in the innate immune response (1,7). In addition, ADAR1 is essential in mammalian development, particularly in hematopoiesis and suppression of interferon signaling to protect hematopoietic stem cells from destruction in the fetal liver and the adult bone marrow (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nuclear cap-binding protein subunit 1 (NCBP1), also known as cap-binding protein 80 (CBP80), plays a role in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing (1,2). It has also been shown to function in the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of mRNAs where translation is prematurely terminated (3). NCBP1/CBP80 increases the efficiency of NMD by promoting the interaction of two active NMD components Upf1 and Upf2 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex regulates mRNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells (1). This regulation occurs at different levels of mRNA synthesis and degradation, including transcription initiation, elongation, deadenylation, and degradation (1). Multiple components, including CNOT1, CNOT2, CNOT3, CNOT4, CNOT6, CNOT6L, CNOT7, CNOT8, CNOT9, and CNOT10 have been identified in this complex (2). In addition, subunit composition of this complex has been shown to vary among different tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, mammals contain six Set1-related proteins: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1, and DPY30, which are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6).MLL2, also known as histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2B (KMT2B), functions to activate gene expression by mediating tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 at the promoters of genes involved in embryogenesis and hematopoiesis, and is required for histone H3 lysine 4 tri-methylation at bivalent promoters in embryonic stem cells (7). Like MLL1, MLL2 is a large protein made up of approximately 2700 amino acids that is cleaved by the Taspase 1 threonine endopeptidase to form N-terminal (MLL2-N) and C-terminal (MLL2-C) fragments, both of which are subunits of the functional MLL2/COMPASS complex. MLL2-N, MLL2-C, WDR5, RBBP5, and ASH2L define the core catalytic component of the MLL2/COMPASS complex, which is recruited to target genes to regulate transcription. MLL1 gene translocations are often associated with various hematological malignancies and thought to be a driving component of these types of leukemia. MLL2 is required for memory formation, proper glucose homeostasis, and cardiac lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (8-11). A recent study has shown that MLL2 is required for survival of MLL-AF9-transformed cells, implicating MLL2 as a potential modulator of MLL1-rearranged leukemias (12). Mutations in MLL2 cause complex early-onset dystonia, and overexpression of MLL2 is associated with gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (13,14).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated DNMT1 (D63A6) XP® Rabbit mAb #5032.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Drosophila piwi gene was identified as being required for the self-renewal of germ-line stem cells (1). Piwi homologs are well conserved among various species including Arabidopsis, C. elegans, and human (1). Miwi and Mili proteins are both mouse homologs of Piwi and contain a C-terminal Piwi domain (2). Miwi and Mili bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in male germ cells and are essential for spermatogenesis in mouse (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex regulates mRNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells (1). This regulation occurs at different levels of mRNA synthesis and degradation, including transcription initiation, elongation, deadenylation, and degradation (1). Multiple components, including CNOT1, CNOT2, CNOT3, CNOT4, CNOT6, CNOT6L, CNOT7, CNOT8, CNOT9, and CNOT10 have been identified in this complex (2). In addition, subunit composition of this complex has been shown to vary among different tissues (3).