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Monoclonal Antibody Glutamate:Sodium Symporter Activity

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Glutamate:Sodium Symporter Activity, Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Glutamate:Sodium Symporter Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the presynaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g., NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing postsynaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels (1,2). In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion (1,2). Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) have been identified. EAAT1 and EAAT2 are expressed mainly in glia, while EAAT3, EAAT4, and EAAT5 are considered to be neuronal transporters (2). EAAT3 is found in the perisynaptic areas and cell bodies of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons (3). Research studies have implicated abnormal EAAT3 expression in the pathophysiology of Schizophrenia (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).