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Monoclonal Antibody Ihc-Leica® bond™ Liver Development

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 is regulated by T-loop phosphorylation, by the abundance of their cyclin partners (the D-type cyclins), and by association with CDK inhibitors of the Cip/Kip or INK family of proteins (1). The inactive ternary complex of cyclin D/CDK4 and p27 Kip1 requires extracellular mitogenic stimuli for the release and degradation of p27 concomitant with a rise in cyclin D levels to affect progression through the restriction point and Rb-dependent entry into S-phase (2). The active complex of cyclin D/CDK4 targets the retinoblastoma protein for phosphorylation, allowing the release of E2F transcription factors that activate G1/S-phase gene expression (3). Levels of cyclin D protein drop upon withdrawal of growth factors through downregulation of protein expression and phosphorylation-dependent degradation (4).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).